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10 Things Only People Who Grew Up In Metropolitan Cities Would Understand

10 Things Only People Who Grew Up In Metropolitan Cities Would Understand

Metropolitan cities can be among the happiest or the loneliest places to grow up. It all depends on the way you see things. To most people, it can be a combination of both.

Among other things, you’re raised in a culture that encourages you to both work and play hard. And it is this very bifurcated lifestyle that makes you so different from the rest.

Having been born and raised in a metropolitan city myself, here is a list I have compiled of 10 things only people who grew up in metropolitan cities would understand.

1. You were raised playing a sport of some sort.

If you grew up in a metropolitan city, it’s highly likely that you grew up supporting a local sports team.

And in hopes of one day being among your heroes, you probably spent a lot of your days playing the sport either with your friends or better yet, as a part of an amateur team.

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So at some point in your life, if not for a prolonged period, you’ve virtually been fixated with the sport.

2. You have loyalty to certain local brands.

Big metropolitan cities may be a major market for large international companies but there are plenty of local brands as well. It doesn’t matter if they have established themselves globally or not, you have a soft corner for them.

You never cease to love these brands and they are parts of your connection to the city. You feel attached to the city when you use something that came out your local enterprise, in a distant land.

3. You have lived behind doors with multiple locks.

Life in big cities is loud. It’s not to mean that life in big cities is scary all the time. But more than once you must have lived behind doors with multiple locks. Remember that time when gang wars broke out around the corner?

Big cities are full of hustle and tussle and sometimes circumstances get crazy. For safety concerns, you and your family might have spent some nights inside a house with multiple locks on the door.

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4. You feel that being different is good.

“You laugh at me because I’m different, I laugh at you because you’re all the same.” You must have lived by this Jonathan Davis quote as someone who grew up in a big city.You want to stand apart from others in the crowd.

The love for something different extends beyond personal motivation as well. You don’t want resort yourself to same sort of routine all the time. You always want to explore things new and march into the unknown.

5. You grew up really fast.

Kids in big cities seem to grow really fast. With so many people living around you as you grew up, it was very easy for you to be exposed to many of the ways and adversity of adult life. And with your parents busy in their vocations, you might also have needed to act like a grownup from the early stages of life.

Whether it be in the form of learning to drive, getting a taste of alcohol or going on a first date, you must have experienced the stuff of grown-ups at a pretty early age compared to kids from smaller cities.

6. You have seen the evolution of advanced technologies.

Metropolitan life is always in demand of change. It always wants to experience something new. And it’s served in that manner pretty aptly as well. The newest of technologies make their presence first known in these big cities as son as the are invented.

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Over the years, you must have seen the advancement of technologies at your city and in your life. You have lived through the early years of the internet, the growth of e-commerce, the emergence of social media and rise of smart phones. Things always keep changing in your cities.

7. You have read at schools with racial diversity.

The populace of metropolitan cities are generally diverse. People from different ancestries, races and cultures gather in such cities from all around the world. So as a student, you must have read at schools with racial diversity.

Having grown up in a racially diverse environment, you’re positive towards people of different cultures. Your friend circle is highly likely to be diverse in nature. Such is not the case in small towns where certain races are dominant.

8. You learned to use public transportation at a very young age.

Your folks were off to work and couldn’t always drive you to your destination. In those circumstances, you learned to use public transportation from a very tender age.

Whether it was going to school every day or visiting a relative or going to some fun event, you had to take public transportation at a very tender age. You should have plenty of vivid memories on buses as a child.

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9. You never had a legitimate reason to feel bored.

Boredom in a metropolitan city is very rare or almost doesn’t happen. There are too many things you can participate in. Feeling bored? There are plenty of fun things to do in these cities.

Visiting fun parks, discos, gaming parlors and late night parties are some of the common things people do to avoid boredom.

In those times you felt bored, you have visited malls, taken a free outdoor yoga classes, visited a stadium and cheered for your favorite football team or enjoyed street food.

10. You never had to wait long for your favorite band to come to town.

This is the most joyful reason to grow up in metropolitan cities. Whether you are a fan of international bands like AC/DC, Green Day, Metallica or local bands in your country, prepare yourself, they may visit your city anytime.

You may also get the chance to get an autograph or even to take pictures with them if you are lucky enough. Different bands frequently visit metropolitan cities enlarging your joy of being part of the city. Of course, you may have to struggle and skip work or school though to get a ticket.

Featured photo credit: Metropolitan City (Wikipedia) via upload.wikimedia.org

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Nabin Paudyal

Co-Founder, Siplikan Media Group

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

    Why You Need a Vision

    Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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    How to Create Your Life Vision

    Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

    What Do You Want?

    The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

    It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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    Some tips to guide you:

    • Remember to ask why you want certain things
    • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
    • Give yourself permission to dream.
    • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
    • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

    Some questions to start your exploration:

    • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
    • What would you like to have more of in your life?
    • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
    • What are your secret passions and dreams?
    • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
    • What do you want your relationships to be like?
    • What qualities would you like to develop?
    • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
    • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
    • What would you most like to accomplish?
    • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

    It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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    What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

    Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

    A few prompts to get you started:

    • What will you have accomplished already?
    • How will you feel about yourself?
    • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
    • What does your ideal day look like?
    • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
    • What would you be doing?
    • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
    • How are you dressed?
    • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
    • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
    • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

    It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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    Plan Backwards

    It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

    • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
    • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
    • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
    • What important actions would you have had to take?
    • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
    • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
    • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
    • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
    • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

    Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

    It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

    Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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