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10 Reasons You Should Write More Handwritten Letters

10 Reasons You Should Write More Handwritten Letters

1. It’s a memorable way to touch the people you love.

A thoughtful letter can be treasured for years. Visit just about any history museum and you’ll be struck by the impact a letter can have. Countless possessions throughout history have decayed into dust, but fragile pieces of paper have been protected for generations because powerful words are worth reading again and again.

2. Research says it can actually make you happier.

Steve Toepfer from Kent State University studies “author benefits” – the perks you get from penning letters. Toepher says by making a habit of writing thoughtful letters of gratitude, “you’ll feel happier, you’ll feel more satisfied, and if you’re suffering from depressive symptoms, your symptoms will decrease.” This isn’t as strange as it sounds. Telling your friends how much you appreciate them helps you count your blessings and notice some of the beauty in your life.

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3. It confirms the importance of a relationship.

Taking the time to send a thoughtful note shows you cherish a relationship and want to invest in it. This can not only strengthen a friendship or a marriage, it’s also a clever way to grow loyalty with clients and business partners.

4. It’s a classy thing to do.

We write to remind people they’re special; but let’s face it, letters make us look pretty special too. Handwritten letters are a classy friend’s game. Set yourself apart as a lady or gentleman by sticking a stamp to your words of encouragement.

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5. It helps you pause long enough to say things that matter.

Texting and email are mostly reactionary. You need information, so you reach out. Writing letters is much more deliberate. You do it to give, not to receive. You write because there’s something you need to say, not something you need to know.

6. It creates a wonderful surprise.

Remember when getting mail was fun? You never knew what you might find. Now, it’s mostly a pile of bills and junk. You can be the girl who rescues her friends from the drudgery of modern mail! Put something fun in their mailbox and you just might make their day.

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7. It’s a tried and true tradition.

When you send handwritten letters, you’re participating in one of history’s finest rituals. Martin Luther King, Jr’s “Letter From a Birmingham Jail” captured the spirit of the American Civil Rights Movement. Major Sullivan Ballou’s letter to Sarah revealed the conflicted emotions of a soldier who loved his country and a husband who loved his wife. It’s even said that a letter from a young girl convinced U.S. President Abraham Lincoln to grow his iconic beard. Our ancestors recognized the importance of writing letters, and so should we.

8. It speaks to older friends and relatives in a medium they cherish.

To some young people, mail can seem outdated or boring; but for mature generations, it’s a tradition rich in sentiment. Even if your older relatives know how to text, they still love slicing open a handwritten letter.

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9. It’s a chance to show off (or improve) your handwriting

Most of us spent hours in school practicing our printing and cursive; but now that we’re “grown ups,” we never get to show off our skills! For you talented calligraphers, handwritten letters are your 15 minutes of fame. Or, if you’re like me, writing letters gives you a chance to improve your lovable scribbling.

10. It’s easier than you think.

Well-written cards can be some of the least expensive and most meaningful gifts you will ever give. With a few strokes of the pen, you have the power to encourage a loved one, inspire a friend, or kindle a romance. The hardest part is getting started, so let’s make it simple. Who do you appreciate most in life? If you could only speak to them one more time, what would you tell them? Write that down right now. Don’t worry about penmanship. Afterwards, all you’ll need to do is find the right card, transcribe your message, slap on a stamp, and remind that bored little flag on your mailbox that it was made for a purpose.

Featured photo credit: Handwritten Letters/Kelsi Laine via kelsilaine.com

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Operations Manager, GoinsWriter

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Last Updated on January 18, 2019

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

1. Limit the time you spend with them.

First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

2. Speak up for yourself.

Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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5. Change the subject.

When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

7. Leave them behind.

Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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