Advertising
Advertising

How to Lead Like Leslie Knope From “Parks & Rec”

How to Lead Like Leslie Knope From “Parks & Rec”

Parks and Recreation may have ended, but the legend of Leslie Knope still lives on. Throughout the seven seasons of NBC’s Parks & Rec, viewers got to know and love the Deputy Director of the Parks and Recreation Department, Leslie Knope. Played by Amy Poehler, Knope is perhaps the most over-eager and determined character to ever grace the television screen. It’s because of this tenacity and dedication that Leslie Knope is such an amazing leader. She may be a fictional character, but she is certainly a model to look up to and aspire to.

Here are five things you can do to be a great boss and lead like Leslie Knope.

Advertising

1. Do work worth doing.

In a town as apathetic and thankless as Pawnee, Indiana, Leslie could have given up many times, but she does work worth doing. Her work is a constant source of inspiration to her, her team, and the people around her. Leslie dedicates her energies to the places where she can have the greatest impact and do the most good.

2. Be passionate about progress.

Despite a seemingly never-ending stream of ethical roadblocks along the way, Leslie never loses sight of her goals and the needs of the causes she is championing. She does things because they’re the right thing to do, not because they’re popular or easy. This is an important leadership lesson in itself. As a leader, you have to make hard choices – and people won’t necessarily like them – but if you’re passionate about progress and if your choices come from an honest place, then you’ll steer your business and your team in the right direction.

Advertising

3. Think of the big picture.

If you’ve ever watched an episode of Parks and Rec, you’re well aware of the centuries-old feud between the fictional towns of Pawnee and Eagleton. Despite this deep-seated hatred, Leslie is willing to help the town of Eagleton during its time of need. She puts differences aside, reaches out, and lifts up her neighbors. Leslie acts for the common good, she thinks of the big picture and how to benefit the most people.

As a leader, it’s vital to employ this big picture thinking. Furthermore, it’s important for leaders to be charitable and to be active leaders in the community. Lead by example. Show the importance of giving where you’re able to give and helping your community. Under the direction of their generous leaders, the most successful and well-respected companies participate in community outreach programs and volunteer on a regular basis.

Advertising

4. But always pay attention to the little things.

Her acute attention to detail makes Leslie the ultimate public servant and an attentive leader who truly connects with her team. Leslie is hyper-organized and detail oriented, as evidenced by her lengthy reports in thick color-coded binders on just about everything. She also a habit of giving the perfect gift for each of her fictional holidays. By paying attention to the little things, she gets to know her staff on a personal level and is able to hone in on how to motivate each of them individually. Leslie’s knack for thoroughness means she prepares lengthy reports that make a difference in the community and get noticed by the higher-ups in Washington. By paying attention to the little things, Leslie is able to be a better leader and an amazing colleague.

5. Care.

As viewers see in the show, Leslie takes on various roles. She moves on to new jobs and pursues new adventures. She knows when to move on and how to best dedicate her boundless stream of energy. No matter what hat she wears or what project she’s working on, Leslie is consistent in her efforts and in her caring. She cares about everything she does. This notion is reflected in the quality of her work. The best leaders care about every paper that crosses their desks, every phone call they make, and every person that sits in their building.

Advertising

In Leslie Knope’s words, “No one achieves anything alone.” Your team will be a reflection of your leadership. Dare to care. Dare to be a Leslie Knope.

Conclusion

Do you want to know more about how you can be the best possible leader? Complete a quick and easy leadership assessment, courtesy of Orlando businessman Joel Goldstein, President of Mr. Checkout Distributors. It only takes three minutes to find out your leadership strengths!

More by this author

Joel Goldstein

Entrepeneur

How to Build Healthy Competition Between Millennial Employees? 4 Visual Merchandising Tips for the Holidays How To Succeed At Your First Sales Job 5 Signs You’re Not Meant to Be A Salesperson Follow These 4 Tips to Make Your App Millennial-Friendly

Trending in Productivity

1 22 Best Habit Tracking Apps You Need in 2021 2 6 Reasons Why Perfectionism Kills Your Productivity 3 How to Become a Person Who Can Visualize Results 4 7 Ways to Eliminate Your Excuses 5 4 Effective Ways To Collaborate With Your Team

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on January 25, 2021

6 Reasons Why Perfectionism Kills Your Productivity

6 Reasons Why Perfectionism Kills Your Productivity

Perfectionism sounds like a first world problem, but it stifles creative minds. Having a great idea but doubting your ability to execute it can leave you afraid to just complete and publish it. Some of the most successful inventors failed, but they kept going in pursuit of perfection. On the other end of the spectrum, perfectionism can hinder people when they spend too much time seeking recognition, gathering awards and wasting time patting themselves on the back. Whatever your art, go make good art and don’t spend time worrying that your idea isn’t perfect enough and certainly don’t waste time coming up with a new idea because you’re still congratulating yourself for the last one.

1. Remember, perfection is subjective.

If you’re worried about achieving perfectionism with any single project so much that you find yourself afraid to just finish it, then you aren’t being productive. Take a hard look at your work, edit and revise, then send it our into the world. If the reviews aren’t the greatest, learn from the feedback so you can improve next time.

Advertising

2. Procrastination masquerades itself as perfectionism.

People who procrastinate aren’t always lazy or trying to get out of doing something. Many who procrastinate do so because perfectionism is killing their productivity, telling them that if they wait a better idea will come to them.

3. Recognize actions that waste time.

Artists and all creative people need time to incubate; those ideas will only grow when properly watered, but if you’re not engaging in an activity that will help foster creativity, you might just be wasting time. Remember to do everything with purpose, even relaxing.

Advertising

Advertising

4. Don’t discriminate against your worth.

No one is actually perfect. We often have tremendous ideas or write things that move people emotionally, but no one attains that final state of being perfect. So, don’t get down if your second idea isn’t as good as your first—or vice versa. Perfectionists tend to be the toughest critics of their work, so don’t criticize yourself. You are not your work no matter how good or how bad.

5. Stress races your heart and freezes your innovation.

Stress is a cyclic killer that perfectionists know well because that same system that engages and causes your palms to sweat over a great idea is the same system that kicks in and worries you that you’re not good enough. Perfectionism means striving for that ultimate level, and stress can propel you forward excitedly or leave you shaking in fear of the next step.

Advertising

6. Meeting deadlines beats waiting for perfect work.

Don’t let your fear of failure prevent you from meeting your deadline. Perfection is subjective and if you’re wasting time or procrastinating, you should just finish the job and learn from any mistakes. Being productive means completing work. You shouldn’t try for months or even years to perfect one project when you can produce projects that improve over time.

Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

Read Next