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10 Influential Announcements From Google I/O 2015

10 Influential Announcements From Google I/O 2015

The 2015 Google I/O, Google’s 2-day developer conference, featured several significant announcements that will impact users in some pretty exciting ways. Here are ten of the most influential announcements that were made.

1. Android M

Android M is the forthcoming update to Android’s operating system, and with it comes improvements on permissions, battery usage, and fingerprint recognition. The updated operating system features a new opt-in permissions system, allowing users to set app permissions on an individual basis. A new feature called Doze increases battery time by shutting down background processes when the device isn’t being physically handled. Improved fingerprint recognition means that users can use fingerprints to authenticate purchases made in the Play Store or with Google’s new Android Pay, as well as providing authentication in other applications.

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2. Android Pay

Although Apple Pay has been out for several months, Google announced its own mobile payment service that will replace Google Wallet. Google announced that Android Pay is already accepted by 700,000 merchants. Android Pay will allow users to make purchases in-app as well as at physical stores.

3. Google Photos

Users can now store photos and videos in Google’s new Photos storage and sharing service. Photos and videos are stored in the cloud and accessible from any device. Google Photos features unlimited storage and some impressive organization and search features that eliminate the need for tags. Users can make videos and collages within the app.

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4. Jump

Partnering with GoPro, Google’s goal with Jump is to create a system by which users can create their own virtual reality content. Google itself is developing a 360-degree camera rig with GoPro, but Google’s goal is that users will be able to use any combination of cameras to create VR content. Jump serves to expand upon Google’s Cardboard VR platform

5. Inbox

Developed by the team behind Gmail, Inbox is designed to make email organization work more efficiently for its users. Features such as Undo Send and Reminder suggestions based on email content will undoubtedly save time and make users lives a little easier. A new feature that Google announced for Inbox is Trip Bundles, which collects all emails related to a trip into one easy-to-access location.

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6. Polymer 1.0

Polymer 1.0 is a new Web App toolkit made available to developers, which allows them to create impressive “app-like experiences” on the web. The toolkit gives developers the tools they need to create web applications faster and supports both desktop and mobile browsers.

7. The Family Store

Google introduced a new section of the Play Store designed specifically for children and parents. The Family Store isolates apps for children 6-8 and 9-12. In addition to the many apps that have already been available for children on the app store, The Family Store will feature many new apps that are designed for children for families to choose from.

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8. Google Maps Offline

Google announce offline accessibility of apps like Maps and YouTube. With Maps, users will no longer run the risk of having a drop in connectivity cause the disappearance of the directions they’ve pulled up. Making apps available offline is Google’s strategy for making app accessibility available in countries where the internet isn’t always readily available.

9. Android Wear

Google makes usability of their Android Wear more prominent by introducing features such as “Always On,” which allows users to select an app still stay open on the screen so that users can get information at a glance. Google also introduced gestures, such as flicking of the wrist, that aids in hands-free navigation.

10. Project Brillo

Brillo is Google’s new operating system designed specifically for the Internet of Things and will run on connected devices that have low memory and small processors. Google also announced a common language by which these connected devices will communicate with one another called Weave. Brillo will allow Google to get Android onto many more devices.

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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