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This Is Why You Should Rethink Whether Or Not To Wear Suits

This Is Why You Should Rethink Whether Or Not To Wear Suits

How do you view what you wear? Will it be a suit or a casual outfit? At a time when university dropouts and startup entrepreneurs are becoming billionaires it is understandable if the idea of wearing suits seem to wane. However according to a SHRM study it appears suits still rule.

While employers are going a step further to employ image consultants and fashion experts to improve the dress sense in their work place and get the best out of their employees, people still consider you as professional and important when put on a suit. Yet it depends on the organization or the scenario you are dressed for. A suit may not be the best outfit when working in construction or tech companies but it does work ideal in financial organizations.

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The core of the subject though is that what you wear can affect the way you think and also your productivity. According to a study performed by researchers from Columbia University and California State University, what you wear can improve the power of your thought. According to the authors of the study, “Putting on formal clothes makes us feel powerful, and that changes the basic way we see the world.” Dressing more formally tends to offer people a more expansive thought rather than being detailed or narrowed, feels more important than connected and favors abstract reasoning over concrete fact.

To have a clearer interpretation of what this study or research means to those who wear suits and dress formally it will be important to consider another study of over 12, 000 people from 24 countries. According to 45 percent of the workers wearing casual clothes makes them more productive in their job than someone who is wearing formal attire. The other 55 percent of those surveyed believed that suiting makes you more productive than wearing casual clothes.

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When looking at the ideology of dressing for success from a tradition sense the individual could become less intelligent and self aware than if he or she is dressed more casually. Why? Because you are more concerned or absorbed about the effect or reaction you stand to gain from wearing a suit or formal attire. However won’t it be more ideal if you wore something that posed more intimacy, comfort and social awareness than simply wearing a suit?

Perhaps this is why the business world is becoming more dominated by people like Simon Cowell, Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg who are concerned more about effectiveness of what they were rather than the impression they make. At the long run it is just not bringing out the best from people around you but yourself.

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“Dressing casually could cause an employee to feel less focused and alert,” says Dr. Karen Pine, professor of psychology at the University of Hertfordshire and fashion psychologist.”Your attentiveness is affected by what you wear.”  In a study that had people wearing a doctor’s lab coat, participants became more attentive and alert than when they were told that they were putting on a painter’s coat. Their perception on the role they played was more intense and enthused when they wore what was perceived to be a doctor’s lab coat.

Since all these conclusions remain hypothetical and less conclusive it is important for you to pick what is most comfortable for you. Definitely identifying yourself with success means that you don something you are most effective in. While casual dress can be stifling for others it has appeared to become liberating for many.

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As the casual attire insidiously takes over workplace culture and notions for success, we do not expect that the symbolic power of the suit will continue to take charge in the coming years. However you can engage us on twitter and leave a comment on this post to tell us what you think on what you need to wear for success.

Featured photo credit: http://www.pixabay.com via pixabay.com

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Casey Imafidon

Specialized in motivation and personal growth, providing advice to make readers fulfilled and spurred on to achieve all that they desire in life.

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Published on March 26, 2019

How to Write a Cover Letter for a Career Change (Step-By-Step Guide)

How to Write a Cover Letter for a Career Change (Step-By-Step Guide)

Embarking on a career change, tiny or big, can be paralyzing. Regardless of the reason for your desired career change, you need to be very clear on ‘why’ you are making a change. This is essential because you need to have clarity and be confident in your career direction in order to convince employers why you are best suited for the new role or industry.

A well crafted career change cover letter can set the tone and highlight your professional aspirations by showcasing your personal story.

1. Know Your ‘Why’

Career changes can feel daunting, but it doesn’t have to be. You can take control and change careers successfully by doing research and making informed decisions.

Getting to know people, jobs, and industries through informational interviews is one of the best ways to do this.[1] Investing time to gather information from multiple sources will alleviate some fears for you to actually take action and make a change.

Here are some questions to help you refine your ‘why’, seek clarity, and better explain your career change:

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  • What makes me content?
  • How do I want work to impact my life?
  • What’s most important to me right now?
  • How committed am I to make a career change?
  • What do I need more of to feel satisfied at work?
  • What do I like to do so much that I lose track of time?
  • How can I start to explore my career change options?
  • What do I dislike about my current role or work environment?

2. Introduction: Why Are You Writing This Cover Letter?

Make this section concise. Cite the role that you are applying for and include other relevant information such as the posting number, where you saw the posting, the company name, and who referred you to the role, if applicable.

Sample:

I am applying for the role of Client Engagement Manager posted on . Please find attached relevant career experiences on my resume.

3. Convince the Employer: Why Are You the Best Candidate for the Role?

Persuade the employer that you are the best person for the role. Use this section to show that you: have read the job posting, understand how your skills contribute to the needs of the company, and can address the challenges of the company.

Tell your personal story and make it easy for hiring managers to understand the logic behind your career change. Clearly explaining the reason for your career change will show how thoughtful and informed your decision-making process is of your own transition.

Be Honest

Explain why you are making a career change. This is where you will spend the bulk of your time crafting a clear message.

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Speak to the mismatch that may be perceived by hiring managers, between the experience shown on your resume and the job posting, to show why your unique strengths make you more qualified than other candidates.

Address any career gaps on our resume. What did you do or learn during those periods that would be an asset to the role and company?

Sample:

I have been a high school English and Drama educator for over 7 years. In efforts to develop my career in a new direction, I have invested more time outside the classroom to increase community engagement by building a strong network of relationships to support school programs. This includes managing multiple stakeholder interests including local businesses, vendors, students, parents, colleagues, the Board, and the school administration.

Highlight Relevant Accomplishment

Instead of repeating what’s on your resume, let your personality shine. What makes you unique? What are your strengths and personal characteristics that make you suited for the job?

Sample:

As a joyful theater production manager, I am known to be an incredible collaborator. My work with theater companies have taught me the ability to work with diverse groups of people. The theater environment calls for everyone involved to cooperate and ensure a successful production. This means I often need to creatively and quickly think on my feet, and use a bit of humour to move things forward to meet tight timelines.

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Feature Your Transferable Skills

Tap into your self-awareness to capture your current skills.[2]

Be specific and show how your existing skills are relevant to the new role. Review the job posting and use industry specific language so that the hiring manager can easily make the connection between your skills and the skills that they need.

Sample:

As the first point of contact for students, parents, and many community stakeholders, I am able to quickly resolve problems in a timely and diplomatic manner. My problem solving aptitude and strong negotiation skills will be effective to address customer issues effectively. This combined with my planning, organization, communication, and multitasking skills makes me uniquely qualified for the role of Client Engagement Manager to ensure that customers maintain a positive view of .

4. Final Pitch and Call-To-Action: Why Do You Want to Work for This Company?

Here’s your last chance to show what you have to offer! Why does this opportunity and company excite you? Show what value you’ll add to the company.

Remember to include a call-to-action since the whole point of this letter is to get you an interview!

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Sample:

_________ is a global leader in providing management solutions to diverse clients. I look forward to an opportunity to discuss how my skills and successful experience managing multiple stakeholders can help build and retain strong customer relationships as the Client Engagement Manager.

Summing It Up

Remember these core cover letter tips to help you effectively showcase your personal brand:

  • Keep your writing clear and concise. You have one page to express yourself so make every word count.
  • Do your research to determine ‘who’ will be reading your letter. Understanding your audience will help you better persuade them that you are best suited for the role.
  • Tailor your cover for each job posting by including the hiring manager’s name, and the company name and address. Make it easy on yourself and create your own cover letter template. Highlight or alter the font color of all the spots that need to be changed so that you can easily tailor it for the next job application.
  • Get someone else to review your cover letter. At a minimum, have someone proofread it for grammar and spelling errors. Ideally, have someone who is well informed about the industry or with hiring experience to provide you with insights so that you can fine-tune your career change cover letter.

Check out these Killer Cover Letter Samples that got folks interviews!

It is very important that you clarify why you are changing careers. Your career exploration can take many forms so setting the foundation by knowing ‘why’ not only helps you develop a well thought out career change cover letter, [3] but can also help you create an elevator pitch, build relationships, tweak your LinkedIn profile and during interviews.

Remember to focus on your transferable skills and use your collective work experience to show how your accomplishments are relevant to the new role. Use the cover letter to align your abilities with the needs of the employer as your resume will likely not provide the essential context of your career change.

Ensure that your final pitch is concise and that your call-to action is strong. Don’t be afraid to ask for an interview or to meet the hiring manager in-person!

More Resources About Career Change

Featured photo credit: Christin Hume via unsplash.com

Reference

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