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10 Mind-Blowing Illusion Paintings That Make You Look Twice

10 Mind-Blowing Illusion Paintings That Make You Look Twice

In life and in art, perception is reality. Things aren’t always what they seem to be… or are they? Over the years, artists have tried to used the power of illusions with mind-blowing paintings to challenge the human mind. Their works often leave us in awe, as we are left to ponder on the details of creating such strong and enlightening images.

Some images have a distinct mental twist to them, while others are only for entertainment. No matter what, there is no denying the artistic creativity of a mind-blowing painting that makes you look twice.

Here are ten mind-bending works of art from artists spanning several generations that will cause you to question reality. These artists use architectural precision and creative license to show you a world of impossible realities. Enjoy the Surrealism, Magical Realism and Optical  Illusions created by artists ranging from Oleg Shuplyak to M.C. Esher.

1. Tomek Sętowski

Tomek Setowski - Tutt'Art@ (16)

    Tomek Sętowski is a Polish artist known throughout the globe for his distinctive and dream-like style called “Magical Realism”. His art is filled with whimsical fairy-tale characters and beautiful women set among glittering cities floating high in the sky or deep underwater – sometimes both.

    http://www.tuttartpitturasculturapoesiamusica.com/2011/06/tomek-setowski-poland.html

    2. Oleg Shuplyak

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    13-oleg-shuplyak-illusion-two-birds

      Oleg Shuplyak is a Ukrainian surrealist artist who has mastered the the art of optical illusion. He  places characters, objects and coloring strategically throughout his scenic oil paintings to create two layers of images. He is famous for his surrealist depictions of historical famous figures, including Van Gogh, Darwin and Shakespeare.

      http://webneel.com/oleg-shuplyak-illusion-painting

      3. Robert Gonsalves

      magic-realism-paintings-rob-gonsalves-13__880

        Canadian artist, Robert Gonsalves, uses his skill as an architect to perfect his art of illusion. Gonsalves uses precision and imagination to turn everyday scenes into magic through the style of Magic Realism.

        http://www.boredpanda.com/magic-realism-paintings-rob-gonsalves/

        4. M.C. Escher

        slide_239193_1236489_free

          One of the most famous artists of illusion was Dutch graphic artist, M.C. Escher (a.k.a. Maurits Cornelis Escher). Through the medium of woodcuts, mezzo-tints and lithographs, Escher applied his knowledge of mathematics, architecture and geometry to create impossible and seemingly infinite constructions.

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          http://www.mcescher.com/

          5. Jos de Mey

          melancholy-tunes-winter-day

            Look closely at this painting by Flemish-Belgian artist, Jos de Mey. The wall is seemingly parallel to the viewer while the columns are definitely not. For the majority, he used acrylic paintings to create his artwork and primarily featured depictions of impossible objects in a photo-realistic style. He is also well known for borrowing characters from other artists such as Magritte, M.C. Escher, or in the image above, Bruegel.

            http://www.artsology.com/optical-illusions-art.php

            6. Julian Beever

            c9

              Contemporary artist Julian Beever uses the medium of chalk on public sidewalks to create one-of-a-kind, mind-bending illusions.

              http://julianbeever.net/

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              7. Salvador Dali

              Cinquenta Imagenes Abstractas by Salvador Dali OSA372

                Spanish surrealist, Salvador Dali, was one of the most prominent artists in his field. His grandiose and eccentric behavior could only be outdone by his wild and imaginative art.

                http://www.salvadordali.com/

                8. Michael Parkes

                Parkes_Michael-Desert_Dream

                  Michael Parkes’ brings to life breathtaking and romanticized dreamscapes. This American artist now resides in Spain where he works with painting, stone lithography and sculpture to create amazing Fantasy Art and Magic Realism.

                  http://theworldofmichaelparkes.com/cm/Home.html

                  9. Giuseppe Arcimboldo

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                  images

                    Giuseppe Arcimboldo was an Italian artist from the 1500’s. He was a master at tricking the eye reimagining everyday objects such as fruit, vegetables, flowers, books and even fish to create the illusion of faces. Arcimboldo arranged the produce with precision that the painting still gave a very recognizable likeness to the actual subject of the painting.

                    http://www.giuseppe-arcimboldo.org/

                    10. Vladimir Kush

                    27

                      Russian born artist, Vladimir Kush refers to his work as “Metaphorical Realism” as his oil paintings merges images to create fantastic, colorful imagery. Kush now lives in America. His art is on display in galleries throughout the U.S. He prominently creates seascapes and water images, though he also in known to blend images of animals and inanimate objects.

                      http://vladimirkush.com/Editions/

                      Featured photo credit: http://nuffer.name/gallery/March-trip-to-Mexico/optical_illusion_painting via nuffer.name

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                      Last Updated on March 31, 2020

                      Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

                      Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

                      Procrastination is very literally the opposite of productivity. To produce something is to pull it forward, while to procrastinate is to push it forward — to tomorrow, to next week, or ultimately to never.

                      Procrastination fills us with shame — we curse ourselves for our laziness, our inability to focus on the task at hand, our tendency to be easily led into easier and more immediate gratifications. And with good reason: for the most part, time spent procrastinating is time spent not doing things that are, in some way or other, important to us.

                      There is a positive side to procrastination, but it’s important not to confuse procrastination at its best with everyday garden-variety procrastination.

                      Sometimes — sometimes! — procrastination gives us the time we need to sort through a thorny issue or to generate ideas. In those rare instances, we should embrace procrastination — even as we push it away the rest of the time.

                      Why We Procrastinate After All?

                      We procrastinate for a number of reasons, some better than others. One reason we procrastinate is that, while we know what we want to do, we need time to let the ideas “ferment” before we are ready to sit down and put them into action.

                      Some might call this “creative faffing”; I call it, following copywriter Ray Del Savio’s lead, “concepting”.[1]

                      Whatever you choose to call it, it’s the time spent dreaming up what you want to say or do, weighing ideas in your mind, following false leads and tearing off on mental wild goose chases, and generally thinking things through.

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                      To the outside observer, concepting looks like… well, like nothing much at all. Maybe you’re leaning back in your chair, feet up, staring at the wall or ceiling, or laying in bed apparently dozing, or looking out over the skyline or feeding pigeons in the park or fiddling with the Japanese vinyl toys that stand watch over your desk.

                      If ideas are the lifeblood of your work, you have to make time for concepting, and you have to overcome the sensation— often overpowering in our work-obsessed culture — that faffing, however creative, is not work.

                      Is Procrastination Bad?

                      Yes it is.

                      Don’t fool yourself into thinking that you’re “concepting” when in fact you’re just not sure what you’re supposed to be doing.

                      Spending an hour staring at the wall while thinking up the perfect tagline for a marketing campaign is creative faffing; staring at the wall for an hour because you don’t know how to come up with a tagline, or don’t know the product you’re marketing well enough to come up with one, is just wasting time.

                      Lack of definition is perhaps the biggest friend of your procrastination demons. When we’re not sure what to do — whether because we haven’t planned thoroughly enough, we haven’t specified the scope of what we hope to accomplish in the immediate present, or we lack important information, skills, or resources to get the job done.

                      It’s easy to get distracted or to trick ourselves into spinning our wheels doing nothing. It takes our mind off the uncomfortable sensation of failing to make progress on something important.

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                      The answer to this is in planning and scheduling. Rather than giving yourself an unspecified length of time to perform an unspecified task (“Let’s see, I guess I’ll work on that spreadsheet for a while”) give yourself a limited amount of time to work on a clearly defined task (“Now I’ll enter the figures from last months sales report into the spreadsheet for an hour”).

                      Giving yourself a deadline, even an artificial one, helps build a sense of urgency and also offers the promise of time to “screw around” later, once more important things are done.

                      For larger projects, planning plays a huge role in whether or not you’ll spend too much time procrastinating to reach the end reasonably quickly.

                      A good plan not only lists the steps you have to take to reach the end, but takes into account the resources, knowledge and inputs from other people you’re going to need to perform those steps.

                      Instead of futzing around doing nothing because you don’t have last month’s sales report, getting the report should be a step in the project.

                      Otherwise, you’ll spend time cooling your heels, justifying your lack of action as necessary: you aren’t wasting time because you want to, but because you have to.

                      How Bad Procrastination Can Be

                      Our mind can often trick us into procrastinating, often to the point that we don’t realize we’re procrastinating at all.

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                      After all, we have lots and lots of things to do; if we’re working on something, aren’t we being productive – even if the one big thing we need to work on doesn’t get done?

                      One way this plays out is that we scan our to-do list, skipping over the big challenging projects in favor of the short, easy projects. At the end of the day, we feel very productive: we’ve crossed twelve things off our list!

                      That big project we didn’t work on gets put onto the next day’s list, and when the same thing happens, it gets moved forward again. And again.

                      Big tasks often present us with the problem above – we aren’t sure what to do exactly, so we look for other ways to occupy ourselves.

                      In many cases too, big tasks aren’t really tasks at all; they’re aggregates of many smaller tasks. If something’s sitting on your list for a long time, each day getting skipped over in favor of more immediately doable tasks, it’s probably not very well thought out.

                      You’re actively resisting it because you don’t really know what it is. Try to break it down into a set of small tasks, something more like the tasks you are doing in place of the one big task you aren’t doing.

                      More consequences of procrastination can be found in this article: 8 Dreadful Effects of Procrastination That Can Destroy Your Life

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                      Procrastination, a Technical Failure

                      Procrastination is, more often than not, a sign of a technical failure, not a moral failure.

                      It’s not because we’re bad people that we procrastinate. Most times, procrastination serves as a symptom of something more fundamentally wrong with the tasks we’ve set ourselves.

                      It’s important to keep an eye on our procrastinating tendencies, to ask ourselves whenever we notice ourselves pushing things forward what it is about the task we’ve set ourselves that simply isn’t working for us.

                      Learn more about how to fix your procrastination problem here: What Is Procrastination and How to Stop It (The Complete Guide)

                      Featured photo credit: chuttersnap via unsplash.com

                      Reference

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