Advertising
Advertising

What You Should Ask Yourself Before You Quit Your Job

What You Should Ask Yourself Before You Quit Your Job

So you’re thinking about quitting your job? It’s a tough decision with many things to consider, no matter what you do. With unemployment rates nationally around 6.3% and much higher in cities and towns across the country, it’s important to take a systematic look at whether you should quit your current job. Here’s what you should ask yourself before you quit your job

Why do I want to quit?

This is a very important place to start. What about your job do you dislike? Are you being underpaid, but enjoy what you do? Do you hate your boss or clash with co-workers? Are you bullied or feel threatened? Each of these reasons, and the hundreds of others not mentioned, must be considered. When you’re answering the question “why do I want to quit,” be honest and open. Consider if there are things you could do to make the job fit your needs. Having problems with co-workers? Are there things you can do to improve your relationship outside work? Having trouble with your boss? Consider transferring to another part of the company or to a different department. Are you being underpaid? Consider asking for a raise or going for a promotion. No matter what the answers, make sure you fully flush out why you want to quit and make sure you understand all your options.

Advertising

What do I want to do instead?

So you have your list of reasons why you want to quit. What do you want to do instead? Be honest with yourself and know your limitations. Many people want amazing dream jobs, but if they don’t have the qualifications, they must be realistic. Do you need more education or more experience to get the job you want? Is your preferred career very competitive? Understand what can set you apart. Know what you want to do and research how many openings are available in your area, how your requirements stack up, and the pros and cons. Use tools like Glassdoor to see reviews from those in your dream job and review the companies with openings to see what they think. Do your research and make sure the grass really is greener on the other side.

Advertising

Can I afford to quit?

So you know why you want to quit and you’ve found your dream job. Now the question becomes, can you afford to quit? This comes down to two major decisions: Can I afford to quit before I find a new job? And does my new career support my lifestyle as well as my current job? For the majority of people, it’s financially difficult, if not impossible, to walk into your job and quit without another opportunity. And usually when that happens, it’s more because of a snap-judgement rather than a well-thought-out plan. Being without a job for any amount of time can take a huge toll on your financial future, so make sure you don’t make a snap-decision you’ll regret.

Advertising

Will I be happy working for someone else?

When considering a change in career, always consider the other side. If you love your boss but have other issues with the job, consider this: Your boss can make all the difference. Will you find a job with a better boss? Will you have the same freedoms and input you currently have, or will you take a step back. If you’re having problems with your boss, will working at another job really fix it? If you’re getting slack for being late, not finishing on time, etc., is it something you need to fix or is it truly the boss? Make sure you take a real, hard look at the situation. Switching jobs can be stressful and difficult financially. Make sure you’ll truly be happier working for someone else before making the switch.

Quitting your job is a huge decision. Make sure you take the time to answer these questions and make a plan to ensure it’s truly is the best opportunity for your situation.

Featured photo credit: SpectralDesign via flickr.com

Advertising

More by this author

Kyle Robbins

Founder, BrandingBeard.com

Why Helping Others Actually Helps Yourself 10 Things You Must Do When You’re Single 11 Types Of Friends You Will Have In Your Lifetime 12 Things Highly Productive People Don’t Do Visit a park 31 Things You Can Do Instead Of Spending Money

Trending in Work

1 How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor 2 10 Ways to Build Positive Work Relationships and Work as a Team 3 20 Best Places to Work for a Great Career in 2018 4 22 Team Building Activity for Work That Are Fun and Encourage Creativity 5 17 Types of Online Work at Home Jobs that Really Pay Off

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on November 19, 2018

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

I went through a personal experience that acted as a catalyst for an epiphany. When I got fired from a job, I learned something important about myself and where I was headed with my freelance career. I realized that the most important aspect of that one rather small job was the influence of the company owner. I realized that I wasn’t hurt that the company and I weren’t a perfect match; I was devastated by the stark fact that I needed a mentor and I had almost found one but lost her.

Suddenly, I felt like J.D., the main character in “Scrubs,” chasing Dr. Cox and trying to rip insight and wisdom from someone I respect. The realization that a recognized thought-leader and experienced entrepreneur severed ties with me felt crushing. But, I picked myself back up and thought about five ways to acquire a mentor without having the awkwardness of outright asking.

Advertising

1. Remember, a professional mentorship must be mutual.

A professional mentor must agree to engage in a mutual relationship because, as the comedy T.V. series showed us, one simply cannot force someone to tutor us. We have to prove that we are worth the time investment through persistence and dedication to the craft.

2. You have to have common interests with your mentor.

Even if a professional mentor appears at your job or school, realize that unless you and this person have common interests, you won’t find the relationship successful. I’ve been in situations where someone I respected had vastly different ideas about what was important in life or what one should spend his or her free time doing. If these things don’t line up, you may find the relationship won’t be as fruitful, even when the mentor knows a great deal about one industry.

Advertising

3. Thought-leaders will respect your passion.

One of the ways you can prove yourself worthy to a professional mentor is through your passion and your dedication. No one wants to spend time grooming and teaching another who will not take advice or put the effort in to improve. When following thought-leaders on Twitter and trying to engage with higher-ups in a work setting, realize that your actions most often speak louder than your words.

4. Before worrying if he respects you, ask if you respect him.

On the other side of the coin, you should seriously reflect on those common interests and make sure you respect your professional mentor. Just because someone holds a title, degree or office does not mean that person is trustworthy or honest. Don’t be swayed by appearances and take the time to find a suitable professional mentor.

Advertising

5. Failure is often the best way to learn

I honestly have made more mistakes than I can count. I know I’ve learned a great deal from poorly organized businesses and my own poor choices. The most important quality I’ve developed is an ability to swallow my pride and learn from my mistakes. If life knocks me down nine times, I get back up 10 times. One of the songs Megadeth wrote, “Of Mice and Men,” resonates in my mind when I pull myself up by my bootstraps and try again for a goal I’ve set: “So live your life and live it well. There’s not much left of me to tell. I just got back up each time I fell.” Hopefully, this brief post can act as a professional mentor to you in your quest to find not only a brave leader but also a trusted adviser.

Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

Advertising

Read Next