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How to Work With Creatives

How to Work With Creatives

“We love what you’ve done, but we feel that it just needs a few minor tweaks…”

If you have ever uttered that phrase, you’ve undoubtedly contributed to one of the more frustrating aspects of working in a creative environment. Creatives—a term coined by the marketing industry to describe creative employees and contractors such as graphic designers, copywriters, and the like—are skilled workers who are often hired for projects that businesses can’t handle internally. These creatives take care of branding, web design, promotional materials, web copy, and so much more, but it’s important to know how to work with them in a manner that will alleviate stress and frustration all around.

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Should you find yourself in a position where you’ll be working with a creative, please take note of the following suggestions. I can assure you that your professional relationship will be far less tetchy if you adhere to the dos and don’ts outlined below.

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DO:

  • Sit down with them and explain every aspect of what you’re thinking about. Filling out a creative brief that covers all the different aspects of the project at hand is a great way to lay everything out on paper so you can refer back to it at regular intervals. You’ll be able to establish the scope of the project and all the assets required for it, and in turn you’ll find out how much time each aspect will take. This will allow you to set a solid critical path, and stick to your budget.
  • Show them examples of what you like, and what you don’t like. One of the worst things you can ever do is say something akin to: “I’ll know what I don’t like when I see it.” You (hopefully) wouldn’t go into a restaurant, order everything on the menu just to taste it, and then only pay for the one or two items that you liked, would you? The same thing goes for creative work: you are not entitled to receive thirty different versions to pick and choose from when you’ll only end up paying for one.
  • Familiarize yourself with terminology so you know how to describe what is is you’re looking for. You’ll be able to receive the business card of your dreams if you let the designer know you’d like letterpress printing, rather than just saying that you like cards that look “smooshed in”, and expecting them to know what the hell you’re talking about.
  • Realize that white space is a good thing, and that your logo doesn’t have to fill the whole bloody space. Have you ever owned a pair of Levi’s jeans? If you have, you probably remember that the label was a little patch on the back of the belt area—it wasn’t stretched across your rear end and down your leg. Less is often more, and subtlety = elegance.

DON’T:

  • Let a committee make decisions. If you’re the CEO or project manager, establish right from the beginning that you will have the final say as to whether any adjustments are needed. When you allow a committee to give their opinion about a design or written piece, you’ll have a dozen different opinions to balance, and you’ll end up second-guessing your own decisions. Chances are that the people you’ll be asking will have varying levels of experience and familiarity with the subject, but they won’t agree on anything. Let one person deal with the creative and make all necessary decisions.
  • Say: “This should only take you a few minutes to do.” You likely have absolutely no concept of how long that assignment would take, as you hired this creative person because you couldn’t do this task yourself. What you think may only take a few minutes may in fact require several hours’ worth of work, so it’s best to ask how long it’ll take and then determine whether you have enough money in the budget to cover that work.
  • Tell anyone to “make it POP more”, because that means absolutely nothing and you’ll be loathed just for having said something that douchey. If you don’t know the correct terminology for what you’re trying to express, then find images or examples that illustrate what it is you’re looking for as mentioned in the “DO” section above.
  • Demand that changes should be made if the subject you’re dealing with is something you’re unfamiliar with: instead, trust in the fact that they know what they’re doing. Chances are that you wouldn’t second-guess your dentist with regard to the tools used on your teeth, and you wouldn’t hover over your mechanic’s shoulder, suggesting that they switch around certain plugs and such in your car’s engine, right? Please show that same courtesy to your creative team. They’re no less skilled than any other professional, and if you insist upon peppering your copy with exclamation marks, or adding lens flares to your website just because you think they’re “neat”, you’ll end up looking like a jackass and your business will suffer as a result.
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Catherine Winter

Catherine is a wordsmith covering lifestyle tips on Lifehack.

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Last Updated on September 23, 2020

Do What You Love and Love What You Do to Achieve More

Do What You Love and Love What You Do to Achieve More

Are you waking up each day looking for that perfect thing, activity, or job that will make your life work? Or, maybe you are looking for that perfect relationship. Once you “get” this new thing that will allow you to do what you love, you are sure that you will be happy forever.

In reality, life doesn’t work like that, and we would probably get bored if it did. There is likely no one thing, experience, or activity that will keep you feeling passionate and engaged all the time. What’s important is staying connected to what you love and continuing to grow in the process.

Here, we’ll talk about how to get started doing what you love and achieving more in life through the motivation it brings. Doing this doesn’t have to take a long time; it just takes determination and energy.

Most People Already Know Their Passion

So many people walk around in life “looking for” their passion. They look for it as if true passion is some mysterious thing that is difficult to find and runs away once you find it. However, the problem is rarely lack of passion.

Most of us already know what we love to do. We know what excites us, even if we haven’t done it for years. Instead, we focus on what we think we “must” do.

For example, maybe you love building model cars or painting pet portraits. Yet, each day you work a completely unrelated job and make no time for the activity you already know you love. The truth is you probably don’t need to find your passion; you just need to start doing what you already know you’re passionate about[1].

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No Activity Is Exciting All the Time

Even people who are living their dream lifestyle or working their dream job don’t love it all the time. Every job or lifestyle has parts of it that we won’t like.

Let’s say your dream is to become an actress, and you succeed. You may not enjoy the process of auditioning and facing rejection. You may experience moments of boredom when you practice your lines over and over again. But the overall experience is totally worth it.

Most of life is like that. Don’t set yourself up for disappointment by demanding that life be perfect all the time. If things were perfect and easy, you would ultimately stop learning and growing, and life would begin to lack even more meaning in that case.

Be grateful for both the good and bad moments as they are both entirely necessary if you genuinely want to do what you love and love what you do.

Doing What You Love May Not Be Easy

Living a life you love is unlikely to be easy. If it was, you would not grow very much as a person. And, if you think about a great book or movie, the growth of the main character is what matters most.

What if the challenges you meet along your path to living a life you love were designed to make you grow as a person? You may actually start looking forward to challenges instead of dreading them. An easy life hardly ever makes a compelling story.

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If you struggle to overcome challenges, try writing them down each time you encounter one. Then, write down three ways you could tackle it. Try one, and if it doesn’t work, try another. This way, you’ll learn what does and doesn’t work for you.

How to Do What You Love

There are many small steps you can take to ensure you are making time to do the things you love. Start with these, and you’ll likely find that you’re already on the right track.

1. Choose Your Priorities Wisely

Many people claim they want to do something, yet they don’t do it. The truth is they might not really want to do it in the first place[2].

We all end up following through on what matters most to us. We make decisions moment by moment about what we need to focus on. What we choose to do is what we deem most important in our lives.

If there is something you claim you want to do but you don’t do it, try asking yourself how much you really want it or where it’s currently placed on priority list. Are there other things you want more?

Be honest with yourself: what you currently do each day is a reflection of your priorities. Recognize that you can change your priorities at any time.

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Make a list of your priorities. Really take the time to think this through. Then, ask yourself if what you are doing each day reflects them. For example, if you believe your top priority is spending more time with your family, but you consistently take on extra hours at work, you’re not really prioritizing things in the way you think you are.

If this is happening, it’s time to make a change.

2. Do One Small Thing Each Day

As stated above, doing what you love doesn’t have to mean finding that perfect job that makes you want to jump out of bed in the morning. If you want to do what you love, start with one small thing each day.

Maybe you love reading a good book. Take ten minutes before bed to read.

Maybe you love swimming. Get a membership at the local YMCA, and go there for thirty minutes after work each day.

Dedicating even a short amount of time to something that brings you joy each day will improve your life overall. You may find that, over time, a career path related to what you love to do pops up. After doing the thing you love each day, you’ll be more than prepared to take it on when the opportunity arises.

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If you need help making time for your passions, check out this article to get started.

3. Prepare to Make Sacrifices

If you are an exceptionally busy person (aren’t we all?), you may have to make sacrifices in order to make space for the things you are passionate about. Maybe you take on less extra hours at the office or take thirty minutes away from another hobby in order to develop another that you enjoy.

Looking at your priority list will help you decide what can get put on the back burner and what can’t. Remember, do this thinking about what will help you feel good about how you’re spending your time. 

For example, if you love writing but rarely make time for it, consider getting up 30 minutes earlier than normal. Or instead of browsing your phone for 30 minutes before bed, you can write instead. There is always a way to find time for what you love.

Final Thoughts

If you love what you do, each day becomes a joyful adventure. If you don’t love what you are doing, life feels like a chore. The best way to achieve success is to design a life you love and live it every day.

Remember, doing something you love doesn’t have to include big gestures or time-consuming projects. Start small and grow from there.

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Featured photo credit: William Recinos via unsplash.com

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