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A Glimpse Inside The Minds of 5 Great CEOs And Their Secrets To Good And Swift Decision-Making

A Glimpse Inside The Minds of 5 Great CEOs And Their Secrets To Good And Swift Decision-Making

The greatest CEOs make decisions all the time. They just don’t make them like most of us do.They don’t agonize and deliberate over decisions. They make decisions on the fly and they do it with swiftness and purpose.

How?

They have a structured, minimalist approach to decision making. The decision making process is as sleek as a fighter jet is aerodynamic.

In this post we’ll look at some of the greatest CEOs in recent history and I’ll show you exactly how their individual decision making approaches led their corporations into the history books.

On the face of it, decision-making sounds really complicated and scary. The truth is all great CEOs have a specific approach to decision-making – a clear decision making framework.

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Sure, every great CEO operates with his or her own signature style. But, one thing’s common to all of their approaches: they have their decision-making rules in place long before they even approach a decision.

This enables them to make decisions quickly and consistently in line with their chosen direction. They also used this framework to delegate decision-making through their organisations.

Are their decisions always right? No. But are they always consistent with direction that the CEO decided upon at the start of the company’s journey. You betcha!

And it’s the consistency over time that’s aligned with one direction that has led these companies into the history books.

Another interesting thing about these CEOs – they used their decision making frameworks to buck the trend. They did something radical. They all did something that flew in the face of conventional wisdom. They zigged when the world zagged.

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Let’s have a closer look at five of these game changing CEOs.

1. Steve Jobs (Apple)

Jobs adopted a minimalist approach and ruthlessly axed more than 70% of Apple’s product lines as soon as he was reinstated as CEO in an amazing turn of events (after having been ousted as CEO a few years earlier). He had one main focus : delivering spectacular customer experience innovative design and simplicity of use.He even cancelled the Newton PDA which wasn’t a very popular decision at the time. But Steve’s minimalist approach to product design was clearly in place well before he made these decisions.

2. Warren Buffett (Berkshire Hathaway)

Warren Buffett is unquestionably the greatest investor of all time. His approach to making investments boiled down to buying into great companies when they were undervalued by the market and selling them when they were overvalued. Having started with nothing, Warren Buffett’s personal assets were valued at around $57 billion when he was ranked the richest man in the world. Buffett’s approach to decision-making around investing is very clear. If you’re not going to hold a stock for 10 years then don’t hold it for 10 minutes. Once again, Buffett’s decision-making framework was well in place before he made a single investment decision. He continues to operate with essentially the same decision-making framework that he had in the 1970s.

3. Jack Welch (General Electric)

Welch focused on three strategic circles and insisted that they rank within the first two globally. In 1981, Welch declared that his company would focus its operations on three strategic circles. Each of the businesses had to rank first or second in its global market. Any businesses that didn’t rank in the first two were disposed of. By 1988, its 300,000 employees generated revenues of more than $50 billion and net income of 3.4 billion.

Jack didn’t suffer fools. He got very clear about his objectives, developed a clear decision-making framework and   then executed on it.

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4. Richard Branson (Virgin Group)

Branson focused on customers and not critics. This overarching approach helped Branson make controversial decisions to enter very competitive new markets such as airlines – something analysts frowned upon at the time. Since then Branson’s led Virgin into mobile phone services, financial services and expanded to about 40 companies that span a myriad of other industries. Like Jobs, Branson let his customers priorities direct his decisions. He successfully defied ‘conventional wisdom’ and made his mark in very challenging environments.

5. Jeff Bezos (Amazon)

Jeff Bezos has an uncanny ability to understand the truth of situations and how they may change in the near future. He uses this approach to defy conventional wisdom about how things should be done, and makes revolutionary game changing decisions.  Amazon has revolutionised the way we shop over the last 20 years and continues to do so.

How to become a great decision maker

Here’s the thing about being a great decision maker: You become a great decision maker by making decisions often. It’s like anything. You get better with practice.

Sure, you’re going to screw up quite a lot at first. Every one of these people did. But they got better with practice.

Decision making is a skill that develops over time. And you can’t develop the skill in a vacuum either. You can’t spend hours agonizing over each decision and then tentatively placing your bets. if you want to join the big league then you’re going to have to take risks. Often! But the more risks you take, and the more mistakes you make the better you get at making decisions.

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You can do this

You want to become a great decision maker? You can. You want to walk into the history books? You can. Start by making decisions on the small things today. Decide on doing one small thing right now. Write it down on a piece of paper and then go and do it. You’ll be amazed at how empowered this makes you feel. It all starts from one small decision.

What are you going to decide today?

 

Featured photo credit: Richie, Robert Yarnal via flickr.com

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Last Updated on September 20, 2018

How to Be Happy at Work and Find Fulfillment in Your Career

How to Be Happy at Work and Find Fulfillment in Your Career

If you’re going to spend 1/3 of our life at work, you should enjoy it, right?

Trust me, I know that’s easier said than done. Difficult coworkers, less-than-desirable tasks, or even just being in the wrong position can all lead to a lack of enjoyment and fulfillment in your work.

But what if I told you it doesn’t have to be this way? Or better yet, if you struggle with all of the above (and then some), what if I told you that enjoying your work and finding fulfillment regardless of those obstacles is possible?

Don’t believe me? I don’t blame you because I was there too. Before implementing the tips below, I struggled to get through each day, much less find real fulfillment, in the office. Now, even after the toughest days on the job, I still come away with feelings of pride, accomplishment, and fulfillment. The best news is, so can you.

If you’re ready to make those hours count and find happiness and fulfillment in the office, then read on to find out how to be happy at work and find fulfillment in your career:

1. Discover the root(s) of the problem

For this first step, we’ll need to think back to 8th-grade physics (humor me). We all know Newton’s 3rd law, “for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.” When you think about it, the same can be said outside of physics, and we see this law play out in our daily lives, day after day.

Simply put, all the issues we deal with in the office (and life in general) affect us in a noticeable way.

If you’re appreciated at work, like the work you do and receive frequent praise, promotions, or raises, then this will probably have an altogether positive effect on your life in the office.

But what if we reverse this? What if you feel under appreciated, get passed up for promotions, or get denied raises? This is sure to affect the way you feel at work on a negative level.

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So, before you can implement the steps of feeling happy and fulfilled at work, we first have to discover the reasons why you don’t feel that way already.

Think about it, write a list, or make a mental note. Run through all the reasons you’re dissatisfied in the office, and don’t hold back. Knowing the exact obstacles you’re facing will make overcoming them that much easier.

In fact, as a side-challenge to this article, I recommend picking the top three reasons contributing to your dissatisfaction at work and using the following tips to tackle them.

2. Practice gratitude for an instant uplift

Did you know the simple act of feeling grateful can increase your happiness and make you more fulfilled at work?[1]

Well, it’s true, and it’s scientifically proven.

Dr. Lisa Firestone notes that practicing gratitude “reminds us of what we lacked in the past.” Meaning, it serves as both a boost to happiness and a bit of a wake-up call that things have been or could be, much worse.

Trying to conjure up feelings of gratitude can seem almost impossible when your work situation seems bleak, but hear me out: There are incredibly easy ways to get started and it doesn’t involve trying to “force” yourself to feel grateful about things that stress you out.

For an instant pick-me-up, try this:

Find a loose piece of paper, a blank sticky note, or anything you can write on, be it physical or digital. List just three things that you are absolutely without-a-doubt thankful for in your life.

Now here’s the trick: Don’t just list what you’re grateful for, you have to list why you’re grateful for them, too.

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For example, simply saying “I’m grateful for my kids” will probably make you feel good, sure, but what if we could amplify the warm, fuzzy feeling into real, lasting motivation?

Instead, write the reason you’re so thankful for your children. Is it because they make you laugh and forget about other stressors? Or maybe they help to remind you of why you go to work every day in the first place?

Whatever your reasons may be, jot them down and keep your list somewhere you can see it while you work. A quick glance at your gratitude list throughout the day can provide powerful, positive motivation to keep going.

Bonus:

If you can find just three things to be thankful for that specifically relate to your job, and list why those things make you grateful, your list can also help you find fulfillment in your work itself which can give you an even bigger boost of positivity throughout the day.

3. Take meaningful time for yourself

We all know creating a strong work-life balance can be crucial to feeling satisfied in our jobs, but rarely do we ever address how we’re spending our time outside of work.

Many of us survive a 9-hour work day and commute home only to find ourselves busy with our personal to-do lists, running a household, and taking care of a child (or 2 or 3, and so on).

If you spend all your time working, whether in the office or within your household, you’re going to feel drained at some point. This is why setting meaningful time for yourself every day is highly important.

Look, I get it: I don’t know anyone in the working world who can shun all responsibility for a 3-movie marathon or happy hour with friends whenever they feel like it. But finding time for yourself, be it just 30 minutes to an hour, can really make a difference in how you feel at work.

This works because you’ll have time to actually relax and let the day’s stress melt away while you enjoy something just for you. The to-do lists and stressors will still be there after you’re refreshed and ready to tackle them.

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No time for me-time? Try this:

If you have a busy household, you’ll need to capitalize on a block of time you know will be completely uninterrupted. The easiest way to do this: try waking up 30 minutes to an hour earlier than usual (or push bedtime back an hour if you’re a night owl, like me) and take time to do something you enjoy.

This could be reading with a cup of tea, catching up on Facebook, spending time on a passion project—anything! As long as it’s meaningful to you, it works!

Bonus:

Starting your day with meaningful time for yourself can set you up to have a positive mood that lasts well into office hours, and having your me-time in the evening can give you something positive to look forward to during the day.

4. Get productive and feel accomplished

Don’t you just love the feeling of checking the last item off of a hefty to-do list? That’s because self-motivation can be a huge driver of positivity and success.

When we accomplish something, no matter how small, it makes us feel good, plain and simple. Applying this tactic to your daily work can be the motivator you need to find fulfillment during the daily office grind.

While there are tons of steps to get more done at work, I’ll share my personal favorite: Prioritizing.

Now, many people handle prioritizing differently. Some like to tackle the little tasks first so they can spend focused time on the big to-dos. Others like to knock out the big items first and get to the smaller ones when they can.

No matter which camp you’re in, you may be missing one crucial step: Time management.

So how’s this work? When you factor in the amount of time your priorities will take, it can transform your productivity ten-fold.

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Say you have three top priorities for the day. You might jump into the smaller ones or the bigger ones depending on your preferred method, and then find yourself out of time and bringing work home with you at the end of the day.

This is prevented when you factor in time. Knowing how long each item will take, or deliberately setting specific blocks of time for your priorities can help you accomplish more in the same 8-9 (or 12) hours that you typically spend at work.

Try this:

Take a look at your priorities and consider how long they should take. Pop into your Google calendar (or Filofax, whatever works for you) and schedule time to work on your priority items around any important meetings or events of the day.

The most important thing to remember is to stick to your dedicated time.

Often, when we know exactly how long we have to work on something (and honor this time limit), we’re motivated to get more done on time to avoid taking work home at the end of the day.

The bottom line

There’s no need to waste 1/3 of our lives feeling unsatisfied at work. Luckily, you now have the tools to get started, take back your time, and become happy and fulfilled at work again.

The only question is — which tip will you try first?

Featured photo credit: Ellyot via unsplash.com

Reference

[1]Psychology Today: The Healing Power of Gratitude

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