Advertising

Go From Mediocre to Excellent at Work with These Attitude Adjustments

Advertising
Go From Mediocre to Excellent at Work with These Attitude Adjustments

Resumes are usually sprinkled with the words excellent and superior; however, work performance evaluations can often be a checkerboard of the words satisfactory or mediocre. You could be starting on your first job, on your way to being vice president, signing up for an overseas assignment, or on the hiring side interviewing candidates. These situations all involve a skills-and-adaptability evaluation. How do you narrow the resume versus work performance gap? Try these seven steps and level up from mediocre to excellent.

1. Show up consistently and on time.

This seems basic, yet an online survey conducted by CareerBuilder showed 32% of workers have called in sick when they were not actually ill. Another 16% were late for work at least one time per week and 27% arrived late for work at least once a month. Make sure you are willing to commit your time when you apply for a job. Showing up consistently and on time gets noticed, thanks to the stark contrast from mediocre colleagues who don’t.

Advertising

2. Know the Work Culture and Adapt.

Organizational culture is a set of rules for working together and includes organization values, visions, and working language. It is made up of shared beliefs, attitudes, and underlying assumptions. Are you working in a tech company, a corporate office, a law firm, in the arts, or at a hospital? Is everyone on first-name basis or are titles and surnames expected to be used? Are you an expatriate working overseas? Do your homework and be observant about protocols and dress codes, especially if you meet with clients. Don’t settle for mediocre attire or casual behavior.

3. Understand that the work place is for work and behave accordingly.

Looking forward to your Friday night out with friends? Fine, but don’t make that an excuse to delay or interrupt your work with excited phone conversations or messages. Keen to confirm hotel reservations for a weekend holiday? Call during your lunch break. There’s work-life balance and then there’s obsessing with fun while at work. Be persistent with work focus. When you make an effort to be fully present, you avoid making mistakes and gain credibility. As a side benefit, you won’t get job-related phone calls after work and can be fully present having fun.

Advertising

4. Be a team player and learn to compromise.

When asked to give my opinion about a potential new team member who was a former colleague, I was quick to give a rundown of skills. Then came the follow-up question, “Yes, but do you think she will fit in with the team?” I had to pause before replying to that one.

Interpersonal skills outrank other skills. You could be a celebrated chef, but if your team is performing poorly in fear of your next pot-throwing tantrum, guess who gets shown the door. Yes, it’s the person who causes problems regularly and who may also happen to be overpaid. A team player is willing to compromise. He or she understands about sharing ideas and credit, about taking turns with talking and listening, and with being on and off duty. In team selection, a person who gets along well with others is chosen over the highly skilled but difficult individual, who drops to below mediocre in terms of desirability. Be a person who can work well in different teams.

Advertising

5. Communicate effectively; repeat and check.

Verbal communication ability is at the top of the list of 10 skills employers look for. This comes from a University of Kent summary of surveys by Microsoft, the BBC, and other organizations. The consequences from misunderstandings at work range from loss of revenue and damaged credibility, to fatal results in hospital or military settings. The most common source of miscommunication comes from what social psychologist Dr. Heidi Grant Halvorson calls the “I’m Sure It Was Obvious” effect. We believe we are expressing ourselves clearly and obviously to others, but this is often not the case. Stop being mediocre; never assume. Say instructions clearly, ask the other person to repeat, and check that the task is being done as instructed. If you are on the receiving end of instructions, always ask questions, update on progress, and advise about job completion.

6. Do more than expected and don’t settle for mediocre.

Whether you are asked to compile a list of names, emails, and phone numbers, prepare a handover report, or organize a convention, go the extra mile. Instead of just submitting contact details, add websites too. Categorize them by industry, color code them, and present them alphabetically. Include recommendations in your handover report and tie them up with departmental goals. Suggest a theme for the convention and offer a list of relevant suppliers. Doing more than expected benefits the company. You also gain knowledge, develop new skills, and won’t ever be considered mediocre.

Advertising

7. Think with Innovation, Creativity, and Flexibility.

The Flux Report (2014) is a survey of 250 line managers and 100 HR decision makers for organizations with over 500 employees in the U.K. and Ireland. It lists these three attributes among employee skills that need to be developed to drive company growth. The report also states employees are expected to have multiple simultaneous careers by 2018, with more than half on temporary contracts or working as contractors or freelancers.

Now is the time to invest in yourself. Keep informed about industry trends, update your skill set, and apply these in improving your work. When you’re open to new ways of doing things, you will never be made “redundant” at work.

Advertising

In any workforce, there are those who are perfectly content with satisfactory work ratings, and that’s totally fine. But if you want a work performance evaluation that matches your glowing resume, these attitude adjustments will get you those superlatives!

Featured photo credit: Dread Pirate Jeff via flickr.com

More by this author

How to Balance Time for a Truly Balanced Life Improve Life Quality Now by Enjoying Your Sundays 10 Signs Your Traveling Experiences Have Made You a Better Person 8 Simple Gentlemen Gestures to impress a Lovely Lady Is What You’re Wearing Too Revealing?

Trending in Work

1 20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview 2 How to Start a Side Hustle While Keeping Your Full-Time Job 3 Why Personal Branding Is Important to Your Career 4 How To Boost Employee Motivation During Difficult Times 5 7 Effective Ways To Motivate Employees in 2021

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on November 15, 2021

20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview

Advertising
20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview

“Please describe yourself in a few words”.

It’s the job interview of your life and you need to come up with something fast. Mental pictures of words are mixing in your head and your tongue tastes like alphabet soup. You mutter words like “deterministic” or “innovativity” and you realize you’re drenched in sweat. You wish you had thought about this. You wish you had read this post before.

Advertising

    Image Credit: Career Employer

    Here are 20 sentences that you could use when you are asked to describe yourself. Choose the ones that describe you the best.

    Advertising

    “I am someone who…”:

    1. “can adapt to any situation. I thrive in a fluctuating environment and I transform unexpected obstacles into stepping stones for achievements.”
    2. “consistently innovates to create value. I find opportunities where other people see none: I turn ideas into projects, and projects into serial success.”
    3. “has a very creative mind. I always have a unique perspective when approaching an issue due to my broad range of interests and hobbies. Creativity is the source of differentiation and therefore, at the root of competitive advantage.”
    4. “always has an eye on my target. I endeavour to deliver high-quality work on time, every time. Hiring me is the only real guarantee for results.”
    5. “knows this job inside and out. With many years of relevant experience, there is no question whether I will be efficient on the job. I can bring the best practices to the company.”
    6. “has a high level of motivation to work here. I have studied the entire company history and observed its business strategies. Since I am also a long-time customer, I took the opportunity to write this report with some suggestions for how to improve your services.”
    7. “has a pragmatic approach to things. I don’t waste time talking about theory or the latest buzz words of the bullshit bingo. Only one question matters to me: ‘Does it work or not?'”
    8. “takes work ethics very seriously. I do what I am paid for, and I do it well.”
    9. “can make decisions rapidly if needed. Everybody can make good decisions with sufficient time and information. The reality of our domain is different. Even with time pressure and high stakes, we need to move forward by taking charge and being decisive. I can do that.”
    10. “is considered to be ‘fun.’ I believe that we are way more productive when we are working with people with which we enjoy spending time. When the situation gets tough with a customer, a touch of humour can save the day.”
    11. “works as a real team-player. I bring the best out of the people I work with and I always do what I think is best for the company.”
    12. “is completely autonomous. I won’t need to be micromanaged. I won’t need to be trained. I understand high-level targets and I know how to achieve them.”
    13. “leads people. I can unite people around a vision and motivate a team to excellence. I expect no more from the others than what I expect from myself.”
    14. “understands the complexity of advanced project management. It’s not just pushing triangles on a GANTT chart; it’s about getting everyone to sit down together and to agree on the way forward. And that’s a lot more complicated than it sounds.”
    15. “is the absolute expert in the field. Ask anybody in the industry. My name is on their lips because I wrote THE book on the subject.”
    16. “communicates extensively. Good, bad or ugly, I believe that open communication is the most important factor to reach an efficient organization.”
    17. “works enthusiastically. I have enough motivation for myself and my department. I love what I do, and it’s contagious.”
    18. “has an eye for details because details matter the most. How many companies have failed because of just one tiny detail? Hire me and you’ll be sure I’ll find that detail.”
    19. “can see the big picture. Beginners waste time solving minor issues. I understand the purpose of our company, tackle the real subjects and the top management will eventually notice it.”
    20. “is not like anyone you know. I am the candidate you would not expect. You can hire a corporate clone, or you can hire someone who will bring something different to the company. That’s me. “

    Featured photo credit: Tim Gouw via unsplash.com

    Advertising

    Advertising

    Read Next