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Applying for Jobs? Here are 3 Ways to Make Sure You Stand Out.

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Applying for Jobs? Here are 3 Ways to Make Sure You Stand Out.

So you give your resume one last thorough review. It looks good. You make a few minor tweaks to your standard cover letter, changing a phrase here and there to include the important keywords from the job description. Then you hit send. Just like 257 other candidates.

Maybe in booming economic times, when it’s a seller’s market, you can get away with this passive job-search process: find a great gig posted online, fire off a resume and wait for an interview or an outright offer. But not in a buyer’s market. Not today. If you’re looking for work today, in just about any industry, chances are you’re competing with many people who are at least as qualified as you are. Time to get creative.

1. Make your pitch stand out.

Everybody sends in a cover letter and resume. Do something more interesting, more relevant to the gig you’re applying for – something that gives you a chance to show off what’s unique about you.

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I’ll illustrate with a personal example. I once posted a job for a marketing person whose primary function would be building PowerPoint presentations. We received many dozens of resumes (this was during boom times), and many of the candidates claimed proficiency with PowerPoint. But one candidate actually rebuilt her resume – beautifully – in PowerPoint. This candidate had the simple but brilliant idea to show us her proficiency with PowerPoint, rather than just tell us. She also showed creative thinking and made hers stand out among all of the resume emails that flooded our inbox.

2) Don’t limit yourself to jobs posted.

These days just about every posted job worth having receives dozens if not hundreds of applicants. What’s more, posted jobs represent just a small fraction of the opportunities that pop up all the time. According to a hiring expert quoted in the Wall Street Journal, in fact, 80% of jobs are never even advertised.

So why not work the other way around? Find the companies you want to work for, and pitch them.

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This has two benefits. First, by focusing your search on organizations you’d be enthusiastic about working for, you can make your pitches much more genuine and positive. You can tailor each pitch, making a case for specifically what you like or admire about that company and why you want to join their team. That makes a difference. Second, the field is clear so your pitch will receive more attention. And you never know. You might send in an enthusiastic inquiry about working in the marketing department of a large videogame publisher – a place you’ve always wanted to work at – just when their VP decides it’s time to build out the team. Or yours might be such a perfect background for the company that that same VP might want to bring you in even though they hadn’t planned on adding new staff.

Don’t wait for the right fit for your talents. Find a fit yourself, and then go after it.

3. Offer to prove yourself for free.

Okay, this one is a bit controversial. Some people believe offering to provide some work for a potential employer for free to prove yourself makes you look desperate. Or that it devalues your work and puts you in a weakened position when it’s time to negotiate for the job. And they might be right.

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But I also know that almost nobody thinks to make this suggestion, even if they’re interviewing for their dream job. Doing so will make you stand out. I also know several professionals who have used this tactic to great success. In some cases, they’ve performed a small task, impressed the company and got the job. In other cases, merely offering a free project as proof of their skill – and positioning it that way – has given the company the confidence that they’re the right candidate. And those professionals also got the jobs.

Note: If you’re going to make this offer to a possible employer, how you position the offer is key. You’re offering to do a small task for free because you consider it a minor upfront investment in a long-term relationship. You know that after the company has seen your work, they’ll want more of it. That’s confidence. Not desperation.

By the way, this tactic can work for just about any type of job – not only for designers or web developers. If you’re a corporate trainer, for example, you might suggest crafting a very short training session for a specific department in the company. Sales rep? Perhaps you could offer to craft a very short introductory phone script based on the information you can glean from the company’s website and literature.

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The point here – as with all of these tips – is to be creative. Everyone has a resume, and a cover letter with job-description-matching keywords, and references. What do you have that sets you apart? Don’t be afraid to share it.

Featured photo credit: Captain Kimo via flickr.com

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robbie hyman

Copywriter

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Last Updated on November 15, 2021

20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview

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20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview

“Please describe yourself in a few words”.

It’s the job interview of your life and you need to come up with something fast. Mental pictures of words are mixing in your head and your tongue tastes like alphabet soup. You mutter words like “deterministic” or “innovativity” and you realize you’re drenched in sweat. You wish you had thought about this. You wish you had read this post before.

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    Image Credit: Career Employer

    Here are 20 sentences that you could use when you are asked to describe yourself. Choose the ones that describe you the best.

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    “I am someone who…”:

    1. “can adapt to any situation. I thrive in a fluctuating environment and I transform unexpected obstacles into stepping stones for achievements.”
    2. “consistently innovates to create value. I find opportunities where other people see none: I turn ideas into projects, and projects into serial success.”
    3. “has a very creative mind. I always have a unique perspective when approaching an issue due to my broad range of interests and hobbies. Creativity is the source of differentiation and therefore, at the root of competitive advantage.”
    4. “always has an eye on my target. I endeavour to deliver high-quality work on time, every time. Hiring me is the only real guarantee for results.”
    5. “knows this job inside and out. With many years of relevant experience, there is no question whether I will be efficient on the job. I can bring the best practices to the company.”
    6. “has a high level of motivation to work here. I have studied the entire company history and observed its business strategies. Since I am also a long-time customer, I took the opportunity to write this report with some suggestions for how to improve your services.”
    7. “has a pragmatic approach to things. I don’t waste time talking about theory or the latest buzz words of the bullshit bingo. Only one question matters to me: ‘Does it work or not?'”
    8. “takes work ethics very seriously. I do what I am paid for, and I do it well.”
    9. “can make decisions rapidly if needed. Everybody can make good decisions with sufficient time and information. The reality of our domain is different. Even with time pressure and high stakes, we need to move forward by taking charge and being decisive. I can do that.”
    10. “is considered to be ‘fun.’ I believe that we are way more productive when we are working with people with which we enjoy spending time. When the situation gets tough with a customer, a touch of humour can save the day.”
    11. “works as a real team-player. I bring the best out of the people I work with and I always do what I think is best for the company.”
    12. “is completely autonomous. I won’t need to be micromanaged. I won’t need to be trained. I understand high-level targets and I know how to achieve them.”
    13. “leads people. I can unite people around a vision and motivate a team to excellence. I expect no more from the others than what I expect from myself.”
    14. “understands the complexity of advanced project management. It’s not just pushing triangles on a GANTT chart; it’s about getting everyone to sit down together and to agree on the way forward. And that’s a lot more complicated than it sounds.”
    15. “is the absolute expert in the field. Ask anybody in the industry. My name is on their lips because I wrote THE book on the subject.”
    16. “communicates extensively. Good, bad or ugly, I believe that open communication is the most important factor to reach an efficient organization.”
    17. “works enthusiastically. I have enough motivation for myself and my department. I love what I do, and it’s contagious.”
    18. “has an eye for details because details matter the most. How many companies have failed because of just one tiny detail? Hire me and you’ll be sure I’ll find that detail.”
    19. “can see the big picture. Beginners waste time solving minor issues. I understand the purpose of our company, tackle the real subjects and the top management will eventually notice it.”
    20. “is not like anyone you know. I am the candidate you would not expect. You can hire a corporate clone, or you can hire someone who will bring something different to the company. That’s me. “

    Featured photo credit: Tim Gouw via unsplash.com

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