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9 Behaviors That Will Kill Your Credibility In Meetings

9 Behaviors That Will Kill Your Credibility In Meetings

Whether you view them as essential to productivity or a complete waste of time, in the business world, meetings are here to stay and your behavior when attending them can serve to showcase your worth or undermine your credibility. Here are 9 actions to avoid in all meetings.

1. Using Phrases That Imply Deception

Avoid phrases like “to be honest” or “let me be honest with you” as they imply two rather negative messages to your audience, the first is that you haven’t been honest until this point and the second is that as you are so eager to assure everyone of your honesty, you are probably not being completely truthful. These phrases make you sound disingenuous and can derail your overall message.

2. The Hard Sell

Meetings are a time for open, honest discussion, meant to drive a project forward, they are not an appropriate venue for hard sell techniques. It would be wise to avoid being pushy or trying to force your agenda by distorting the facts or exaggerating the importance of your point.

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3. The Excessive Use of Buzz Words

Every industry has its own unique vocabulary of buzz words, popular jargon that exists within a specific context. These words are typically used as a crutch in business meetings and while some may feel that their use may makes them appear knowledgeable, most listeners see through them clearly.

Try to avoid such overused terms as synergy, proactive, value-added, leverage, agile, growth hacker etc…

4. Being Unnecessarily Vague

Sometimes, to avoid committing to something, it might seem attractive to present your ideas in an overly vague manner. Don’t be afraid to commit yourself in a meeting by outlining the exact, actionable specifics of your plan or idea.

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5. Using Inappropriate Humor

There is no quicker to destroy your credibility than to introduce some inappropriate humor at your next business meeting. We might think that a slightly off-color joke could help to lighten the mood and make us for likable, however, the end result is almost always the exact opposite, the offending of our coworkers and the destroying of our professional image.

Avoid jokes of a racial, sexual or religious nature.

6. Interrupting Others

Allow everyone their opportunity to speak and to completely express their thoughts, uninterrupted. By extending this courtesy to others, they will be more likely to extend it to you and allow you to fully put forth your ideas. Don’t take the attitude that interrupting others makes you appear to your superiors as a dominant worker. Your boss will appreciate your ability to work well in a team environment.

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7. Failure to Take Responsibility

Everyone hates the guy that is first in line when praise is being handed out but nowhere to be found when something goes wrong. Take responsibility for the work that you do, even when that work is subject to criticism.

Avoid putting the blame on others or throwing a team member under the bus. Learn to take responsibility for your actions and accept feedback gracefully, standing behind your work and the other members of your team.

8. Over-promising

Be realistic about exactly what you can deliver and do not over-promise when you are feel that you are under pressure. Even though overstating your abilities may make you look good in the immediate term, it will hurt you in the long run as you fail to deliver on your promises.

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Take an honest evaluation of the work in front of you and give an honest estimate of the time and budget that will be required to deliver.

9. Looking at Your Phone

Keep your phone in your pocket. Everyone in the room is busy, however, the very point of meeting in person is to focus the team’s attention on the tasks at hand. Avoid checking your emails or messages while you are in a meeting or you risk appearing inattentive.

 

Avoid these common meeting pitfalls and maintain your business credibility.

Featured photo credit: le temple du chemisier via flickr.com

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Published on March 26, 2019

How to Write a Cover Letter for a Career Change (Step-By-Step Guide)

How to Write a Cover Letter for a Career Change (Step-By-Step Guide)

Embarking on a career change, tiny or big, can be paralyzing. Regardless of the reason for your desired career change, you need to be very clear on ‘why’ you are making a change. This is essential because you need to have clarity and be confident in your career direction in order to convince employers why you are best suited for the new role or industry.

A well crafted career change cover letter can set the tone and highlight your professional aspirations by showcasing your personal story.

1. Know Your ‘Why’

Career changes can feel daunting, but it doesn’t have to be. You can take control and change careers successfully by doing research and making informed decisions.

Getting to know people, jobs, and industries through informational interviews is one of the best ways to do this.[1] Investing time to gather information from multiple sources will alleviate some fears for you to actually take action and make a change.

Here are some questions to help you refine your ‘why’, seek clarity, and better explain your career change:

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  • What makes me content?
  • How do I want work to impact my life?
  • What’s most important to me right now?
  • How committed am I to make a career change?
  • What do I need more of to feel satisfied at work?
  • What do I like to do so much that I lose track of time?
  • How can I start to explore my career change options?
  • What do I dislike about my current role or work environment?

2. Introduction: Why Are You Writing This Cover Letter?

Make this section concise. Cite the role that you are applying for and include other relevant information such as the posting number, where you saw the posting, the company name, and who referred you to the role, if applicable.

Sample:

I am applying for the role of Client Engagement Manager posted on . Please find attached relevant career experiences on my resume.

3. Convince the Employer: Why Are You the Best Candidate for the Role?

Persuade the employer that you are the best person for the role. Use this section to show that you: have read the job posting, understand how your skills contribute to the needs of the company, and can address the challenges of the company.

Tell your personal story and make it easy for hiring managers to understand the logic behind your career change. Clearly explaining the reason for your career change will show how thoughtful and informed your decision-making process is of your own transition.

Be Honest

Explain why you are making a career change. This is where you will spend the bulk of your time crafting a clear message.

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Speak to the mismatch that may be perceived by hiring managers, between the experience shown on your resume and the job posting, to show why your unique strengths make you more qualified than other candidates.

Address any career gaps on our resume. What did you do or learn during those periods that would be an asset to the role and company?

Sample:

I have been a high school English and Drama educator for over 7 years. In efforts to develop my career in a new direction, I have invested more time outside the classroom to increase community engagement by building a strong network of relationships to support school programs. This includes managing multiple stakeholder interests including local businesses, vendors, students, parents, colleagues, the Board, and the school administration.

Highlight Relevant Accomplishment

Instead of repeating what’s on your resume, let your personality shine. What makes you unique? What are your strengths and personal characteristics that make you suited for the job?

Sample:

As a joyful theater production manager, I am known to be an incredible collaborator. My work with theater companies have taught me the ability to work with diverse groups of people. The theater environment calls for everyone involved to cooperate and ensure a successful production. This means I often need to creatively and quickly think on my feet, and use a bit of humour to move things forward to meet tight timelines.

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Feature Your Transferable Skills

Tap into your self-awareness to capture your current skills.[2]

Be specific and show how your existing skills are relevant to the new role. Review the job posting and use industry specific language so that the hiring manager can easily make the connection between your skills and the skills that they need.

Sample:

As the first point of contact for students, parents, and many community stakeholders, I am able to quickly resolve problems in a timely and diplomatic manner. My problem solving aptitude and strong negotiation skills will be effective to address customer issues effectively. This combined with my planning, organization, communication, and multitasking skills makes me uniquely qualified for the role of Client Engagement Manager to ensure that customers maintain a positive view of .

4. Final Pitch and Call-To-Action: Why Do You Want to Work for This Company?

Here’s your last chance to show what you have to offer! Why does this opportunity and company excite you? Show what value you’ll add to the company.

Remember to include a call-to-action since the whole point of this letter is to get you an interview!

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Sample:

_________ is a global leader in providing management solutions to diverse clients. I look forward to an opportunity to discuss how my skills and successful experience managing multiple stakeholders can help build and retain strong customer relationships as the Client Engagement Manager.

Summing It Up

Remember these core cover letter tips to help you effectively showcase your personal brand:

  • Keep your writing clear and concise. You have one page to express yourself so make every word count.
  • Do your research to determine ‘who’ will be reading your letter. Understanding your audience will help you better persuade them that you are best suited for the role.
  • Tailor your cover for each job posting by including the hiring manager’s name, and the company name and address. Make it easy on yourself and create your own cover letter template. Highlight or alter the font color of all the spots that need to be changed so that you can easily tailor it for the next job application.
  • Get someone else to review your cover letter. At a minimum, have someone proofread it for grammar and spelling errors. Ideally, have someone who is well informed about the industry or with hiring experience to provide you with insights so that you can fine-tune your career change cover letter.

Check out these Killer Cover Letter Samples that got folks interviews!

It is very important that you clarify why you are changing careers. Your career exploration can take many forms so setting the foundation by knowing ‘why’ not only helps you develop a well thought out career change cover letter, [3] but can also help you create an elevator pitch, build relationships, tweak your LinkedIn profile and during interviews.

Remember to focus on your transferable skills and use your collective work experience to show how your accomplishments are relevant to the new role. Use the cover letter to align your abilities with the needs of the employer as your resume will likely not provide the essential context of your career change.

Ensure that your final pitch is concise and that your call-to action is strong. Don’t be afraid to ask for an interview or to meet the hiring manager in-person!

More Resources About Career Change

Featured photo credit: Christin Hume via unsplash.com

Reference

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