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8 Ways Your Assistant Can Make You More Effective

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8 Ways Your Assistant Can Make You More Effective


    While good assistants can free us from routine office operations and guard our schedules, great assistants can accomplish routine non-supervisory work normally performed by a manager or executive, freeing us to focus on higher-level tasks.

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    For those of us fortunate enough to have great assistants, we know how significantly they can improve our effectiveness. I’ve been blessed to have two incredibly great assistants, and while each has moved on to positions of greater responsibility, their contributions remain with me.

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    High Payoff Contributions

    The following four items are tasks (or performance areas) that a trusted assistant can undertake readily, freeing your time of up to a couple of hours a day immediately and dramatically improving the operation of your office — unless it’s already a finely-tuned machine.

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    1. Be the steward of your schedule. Encourage your assistant to take ownership of the effectiveness of your schedule. Make sure he or she understands your work priority and who can — and should — be allowed to override your planned day. Then, let your assistant begin managing your appointments for you. Meet with him or her every morning and afternoon to review it for a couple of weeks and then reduce the meetings to a frequency that serves you both.
    2. Filter and order your email. Really. Why do you need to decide which email you read — and why should you have to repeatedly make that decision based on when someone sends it? People send far too much email and exercise almost no discernment in how to make it more effective. Let your assistant decide what you need to read, and when. How the two of you organize this process is up to you.
    3. Take notes on topics of interest to you in meetings. If you’re using your assistant effectively, he or she already has an idea of what kind of information you need to perform your job well. Let them help you obtain it, and encourage them to make you aware of things you haven’t asked about.
    4. Identify improvements in office operations. This one’s easy. Or you can make it hard. If you don’t have another person who is the office manager, your assistant will be in a great position to recommend — or simply make happen — improvements in how people and information flow into and out of your organization. Give them the responsibility and authority to do it.

    Potential Game-Changers

    The remaining four items contain items some managers are comfortable with, and some items many are very uncomfortable with. No one promised management was easy; these potential game changers can help a great assistant help you be vastly more effective.

    1. Respond to routine email for you. Many of these are fairly easy. Typical examples include routine requests for information, responses to scheduling emails, and inquiries for which your subject matter expertise or specific decisions are not required. In other cases, allowing your assistant to understand how you would respond to similar messages will enable him or her to draft the responses for your review and transmission.
    2. Attend non-decisional meetings for you. If the purpose of the meeting is the distribution of information rather than decision-making, your assistant may free up some of your time for other things by attending these meetings and gathering the information. Then they can summarize it for your review.
    3. Demonstrate potential for advancement. Some really great assistants are very happy in that role and have no desire to move to other positions or to acquire additional responsibility, even when demonstrating clear capability for it. Others have the capability and the desire for increased responsibility. Consider giving it to them. Otherwise you lose a great assistant, as well as a potentially high performer for another job.
    4. Identify potential talent for you. What?! Let your assistant find talent for you?! Why not?  If an assistant has the ability, why waste it? Few people will know your organizational needs and management agenda as well as your assistant, and few people are as well-positioned to “sell” working for you. Does that mean let them hire the talent?  No. I’m not suggesting delegating hiring authority. I’m suggesting leveraging available assets to achieve greater effectiveness with limited time and resources.

    (Photo credit: Young Woman Wearing Headset via Shutterstock)

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    Last Updated on November 15, 2021

    20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview

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    20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview

    “Please describe yourself in a few words”.

    It’s the job interview of your life and you need to come up with something fast. Mental pictures of words are mixing in your head and your tongue tastes like alphabet soup. You mutter words like “deterministic” or “innovativity” and you realize you’re drenched in sweat. You wish you had thought about this. You wish you had read this post before.

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      Image Credit: Career Employer

      Here are 20 sentences that you could use when you are asked to describe yourself. Choose the ones that describe you the best.

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      “I am someone who…”:

      1. “can adapt to any situation. I thrive in a fluctuating environment and I transform unexpected obstacles into stepping stones for achievements.”
      2. “consistently innovates to create value. I find opportunities where other people see none: I turn ideas into projects, and projects into serial success.”
      3. “has a very creative mind. I always have a unique perspective when approaching an issue due to my broad range of interests and hobbies. Creativity is the source of differentiation and therefore, at the root of competitive advantage.”
      4. “always has an eye on my target. I endeavour to deliver high-quality work on time, every time. Hiring me is the only real guarantee for results.”
      5. “knows this job inside and out. With many years of relevant experience, there is no question whether I will be efficient on the job. I can bring the best practices to the company.”
      6. “has a high level of motivation to work here. I have studied the entire company history and observed its business strategies. Since I am also a long-time customer, I took the opportunity to write this report with some suggestions for how to improve your services.”
      7. “has a pragmatic approach to things. I don’t waste time talking about theory or the latest buzz words of the bullshit bingo. Only one question matters to me: ‘Does it work or not?'”
      8. “takes work ethics very seriously. I do what I am paid for, and I do it well.”
      9. “can make decisions rapidly if needed. Everybody can make good decisions with sufficient time and information. The reality of our domain is different. Even with time pressure and high stakes, we need to move forward by taking charge and being decisive. I can do that.”
      10. “is considered to be ‘fun.’ I believe that we are way more productive when we are working with people with which we enjoy spending time. When the situation gets tough with a customer, a touch of humour can save the day.”
      11. “works as a real team-player. I bring the best out of the people I work with and I always do what I think is best for the company.”
      12. “is completely autonomous. I won’t need to be micromanaged. I won’t need to be trained. I understand high-level targets and I know how to achieve them.”
      13. “leads people. I can unite people around a vision and motivate a team to excellence. I expect no more from the others than what I expect from myself.”
      14. “understands the complexity of advanced project management. It’s not just pushing triangles on a GANTT chart; it’s about getting everyone to sit down together and to agree on the way forward. And that’s a lot more complicated than it sounds.”
      15. “is the absolute expert in the field. Ask anybody in the industry. My name is on their lips because I wrote THE book on the subject.”
      16. “communicates extensively. Good, bad or ugly, I believe that open communication is the most important factor to reach an efficient organization.”
      17. “works enthusiastically. I have enough motivation for myself and my department. I love what I do, and it’s contagious.”
      18. “has an eye for details because details matter the most. How many companies have failed because of just one tiny detail? Hire me and you’ll be sure I’ll find that detail.”
      19. “can see the big picture. Beginners waste time solving minor issues. I understand the purpose of our company, tackle the real subjects and the top management will eventually notice it.”
      20. “is not like anyone you know. I am the candidate you would not expect. You can hire a corporate clone, or you can hire someone who will bring something different to the company. That’s me. “

      Featured photo credit: Tim Gouw via unsplash.com

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