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8 Things To Do If You Think You’re In The Wrong Career

8 Things To Do If You Think You’re In The Wrong Career

The Great Recession had a huge impact on the global labor market, as millions of citizens lost jobs amid a host of public and private sector cuts. Alongside a technological evolution which has eliminated opportunities in some industries and created new careers in others, the labor market has yet to make a full and clearly-defined recovery.

While this has helped to create flexibility in the job market and inspire a new generation of freelancers, it has also made long-term security extremely hard to find. Modern-day job seekers must maintain an open-minded approach when seeking out opportunities, while those already in gainful employment may find themselves committed to an unsuitable or unfulfilling role.

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What to do if you find yourself in the wrong career

If you belong to this category, it is all too easy to become disillusioned with the labor market and the lack of suitable, long-term opportunities. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to manage this situation and identify a relevant solution. Consider the following:

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1. Do not dwell on past events

Although the recent recession may have had a huge impact on the labor market, this is not the only potential trigger for a lack of job satisfaction. You may have made a series of poor decisions, which have left you working in a role that does not suit either your skill-set or future aspirations. It is important not to dwell on past events or the exact reason for your career stagnation, as this will only create further feelings of negativity and depression. If you do reflect on these events, be sure to remain objective and look for positive lessons that can be learned.

2. List reasons why you are dissatisfied with your career

There are multiple reasons why you may be dissatisfied with your career, and it is important to consider these carefully before making a rash decision concerning your future. The intensity of these feelings can make it extremely difficult to maintain perspective. So be aware of this and make a conscious commitment to invest time and thought into determining your next move. Start by making a list of reasons why you are unhappy in your job, working through each to identify whether or not they can be realistically resolved over time.

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3. Consider the positive aspects of your career

Conversely, your feelings of discontentment can easily overwhelm the positive or enjoyable aspects of your career. These are worthy of consideration, especially if you are fortunate enough to have a secure position of employment and a salary that reflects your credentials. It would be unwise to discard a fruitful career without fully appraising both its benefits and its drawbacks, as problems you are encountering may be short-term in nature or relatively easy to overcome. With this in mind, make sure you have an overview of the situation before making a final decision.

4. Understand the financial risks of immediately leaving your job

Even if you do decide that your current career is not right for you, making an immediate change is not necessarily the best course of action. This is especially true if you have a number of financial commitments, as unemployment may trigger a cycle of debt and subsequent feelings of anxiety, depression and panic. Always look to seek out alternative opportunities and roles of employment before leaving your existing position, as this will help you maintain a continual source of income.

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5. Analyze your strengths and weaknesses before job hunting

When looking for alternative job roles, it is important to consider your strengths and weaknesses as an individual and employee. Your recent experience of being a disgruntled worker may have altered your self-perception, and revealed aspects of your personality that you did not know existed. So before commencing a new career, it is crucial you have a clear understanding of your unique value and any areas that require improvement. This will strengthen future job applications and help prevent previous issues from reoccurring.

6. Begin to network and identify relevant industry contacts

Once you have identified the future career path that will best suit you, begin networking and develop a range of relevant industry contacts. Whether you are looking to remain in the same sector as before or branch out into a new and unfamiliar market, identify influential partners who can help you achieve your career ambitions. These may be leading industry thought leaders or potential employers, but either way they can introduce you to new and exciting opportunities.

7. Develop your skill-set and academic credentials

While technological advancement has a reputation for making and breaking industries, there are sectors where it’s impact may be less dramatic. Regardless of this, the pace and unrelenting nature of innovation has forced every industry to evolve to some degree or another. This means employees must refine their skill-sets and academic qualifications on a regular basis. This is especially true if you are looking to change careers, as you will need to boast the relevant credentials in the eyes of employers.

8. Re-evaluate your life as a whole

As you prepare for your career switch, it may be the ideal time to re-evaluate your life and address any work-life balance issues that may exist. These issues may have played a part in exacerbating your previous feelings of discontentment, especially if you worked in a stressful job role that demanded considerable amounts of time and focus. By evaluating your life, its contents and the priority you give to employment, you can approach your new career with the right mind-set and avoid replicating previous mistakes in the future.

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Last Updated on March 30, 2020

How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

Traditionally, when you have a lot of ideas in your mind, you would create a text document, or take a sheet of paper and start writing in a linear fashion like this:

  • Intro to Visual Facilitation
    • Problem, Consequences, Solution, Benefits, Examples, Call to action
  • Structure
    • Why, What, How to, What If
  • Do It Myself?
    • Audio, Images, time-consuming, less expensive
  • Specialize Offering?
    • Built to Sell (Standard Product Offering), Options (Solving problems, Online calls, Dev projects)

This type of document quickly becomes overwhelming. It obviously lacks in clarity. It also makes it hard for you to get a full picture at a glance and see what is missing.

You always have too much information to look at, and most often you only get a partial view of the information. It’s hard to zoom out, figuratively, and to see the whole hierarchy and how everything is connected.

To see a fuller picture, create a mind map.

What Is a Mind Map?

A mind map is a simple hierarchical radial diagram. In other words, you organize your thoughts around a central idea. This technique is especially useful whenever you need to “dump your brain”, or develop an idea, a project (for example, a new product or service), a problem, a solution, etc. By capturing what you have in your head, you make space for other thoughts.

In this article, we are focusing on the basics: mind mapping using pen and paper.

The objective of a mind map is to clearly visualize all your thoughts and ideas before your eyes. Don’t complicate a mind map with too many colors or distractions. Use different colors only when they serve a purpose. Always keep a mind map simple and easy to follow.

    Image Credit: English Central

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    By following the three next steps below, you will be able to create such mind maps easily and quickly.

    3 Simple Steps to Create a Mind Map

    The three steps are:

    1. Set a central topic
    2. Add branches of related ideas
    3. Add sub-branches for more relevant ideas

    Let’s take a look at an example Verbal To Visual illustrates on the benefits of mind mapping.[1]

    Step 1 : Set a Central Topic

    Take a blank sheet of paper, write down the topic you’ve been thinking about: a problem, a decision to make, an idea to develop, or a project to clarify.

    Word it in a clear and concise manner.

      What is the first idea that comes to mind when you think of the subject for your mind map? Draw a line (straight or curved) from the central topic, and write down that idea.

        Step 3 : Add Sub-Branches for More Relevant Ideas

        Then, what does that idea make you think of? What is related to it? List it out next to it in the same way, using your pen.

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          You can always add more to it later, but that’s good for now.

          In our example, we could detail the sub-branch “Benefits” by listing those benefits in sub-branches of the branch “Benefits”. Unfortunately, we already reached the side of the sheet, so we’re out of space to do so. You could always draw a line to a white space on the page and list them there, but it’s awkward.

          Since we created this mind map on a regular letter-format sheet of paper, the quantity of information that fits in there is very limited. That is one of the main reasons why I recommend that you use software rather than pen and paper for most of the mind mapping that you do.

          Repeat Step 2 and Step 3

          Repeat steps 2 and 3 as many times as you need to flush out all of your ideas around the topic that you chose.

            I added first-level (main) branches around the central topic mostly in a clockwise fashion, from top-right to top-left. That is how, by convention, a mind map is read.

            In the next section, we are covering the three strategies to building your maps.  

            Mind Map Examples to Illustrate Mind Mapping

            You can go about creating a mind map in various ways:

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            • Branch by Branch: Adding whole branches (with all of their sub-branches), one by one.
            • Level by Level: Adding elements to the map, one level at a time. That means that firstly, you add elements around the central topic (main branches). Then, you add sub-branches to those main branches. And so on.
            • Free-Flow: Adding elements to your mind map as they come to you, in no particular order.

            Branch by Branch

            Start with the central topic, add a first branch. Focus on that branch and detail it as much as you can by adding all the sub-branches that you can think of.

              Then develop ideas branch by branch.

                A branch after another, and the mind map is complete.

                  Level by Level

                  In this “Level by Level” strategy, you first add all the elements that you can think of around the central topic, one level deep only. So here you add elements on level 1:

                    Then, go over each branch and add the immediate sub-branches (one level only). This is level 2:

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                      Idem for the next level. This is level 3. You can have as many levels as you want in a mind map. In our example, we only have 3 levels. Now the map is complete:

                        Free-Flow

                        Basically, a free flow strategy of mind mapping is to add main branches and sub-topics freely. No rules to restrict how ideas should flow in the mind map. The only thing to pay attention to is that you need to be careful about the level of the ideas you’re adding to the mind map — is it a main topic, or is it a subtopic?

                          I recommend using a combination of the “Branch by Branch” and the “Free-Flow” strategies.

                          What I normally do is I add one branch at a time, and later on review the mind map and add elements in various places to finish it. I also sometimes build level 1 (the main branches) first, then use a “Branch by Branch” approach, and later finish the map in a “Free-Flow” manner.

                          Try each strategy and combinations of strategies, and see what works best for you.

                          The Bottom Line

                          When you’re feeling stuck or when you’re just starting to think about a particular idea or project, take out a paper and start to brain dump your ideas and create a mind map. Mind mapping has the magic to clear your head and have your thoughts organized.

                          If you can’t always have access to a paper and pen, don’t worry! Creating a mind map with software is very effective and you get none of the drawbacks of pen and paper. You can also apply the above steps and strategies just the same when using a mind mapping tool on the phone and computer.

                          More Tools to Help You Organize Thoughts

                          Featured photo credit: Alvaro Reyes via unsplash.com

                          Reference

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