Advertising
Advertising

7 Ways To Tell The Difference Between Real Leadership and Good Management

7 Ways To Tell The Difference Between Real Leadership and Good Management

People often wrongly assume that management and leadership are synonyms. Nothing could be further from the truth. The roles and responsibilities of a leader and a manager are quite different. Here are 7 examples to show you that they are like chalk and cheese.

“Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” – Peter F. Drucker, Essential Drucker: Management, the Individual and Society

1. A manager deals with tasks while a leader develops relationships

A manager has to deal with day to day tasks when running the business. These can be anything from budget control, staff training, customer service or introducing a new product. The manager will be focusing on deadlines and procedures. Many of these are used as benchmarks for measuring success.

A leader will be focused on empowering people within the organization and cultivating influential contacts outside the company. He or she will spend much time and energy in motivating staff.

Advertising

2. A manager will rarely think outside the box while a leader will engineer change

A leader is concerned with a vision for the company and will be looking to the future. Leaders know that change may be vital for stability in an uncertain economy.

Steve Jobs was highly regarded as a leader because his focus and vision were always to the forefront in his company. He was constantly on the look out for great talent which could help him put that vision into practice. It is said that Jobs interviewed over 5,000 applicants during his life.

Managers tend to work within the limits set by project descriptions and individual job plans and will rarely recommend change. Managers need to have excellent people skills which are all focused on getting the job done with the minimum of friction.

3. A leader seeks to empower while a manager looks to micro manage

A leader will see empowered employees as an asset to the company. He or she does not see them as a threat when they take initiative and run a risk.

Advertising

Managers, on the other hand, prefer to delegate and micro manage so that they still maintain control. They also want to preserve the status quo rather than go outside the boundaries.

4. A manager will maintain systems while a leader will inspire followers

The leader’s role is to gain followers by influencing them. This is the only way to move people forward in line with your vision.

A manager can rarely play that role as he or she will be focused on getting tasks done within guidelines and deadlines.

5. A leader will use emotional intelligence while a manager may be less aware

Daniel Goleman has written an interesting article entitled The Focused Leader in which he highlights the role of emotional intelligence in great leadership. He says that the key to emotional intelligence is self awareness. This helps to develop empathy, motivation, social skills and self-control which will be key in effective leadership.

Advertising

Many managers will also possess emotional intelligence (EQ) which they will use in managing employees with tact and sensitivity. However, some mangers are unaware of how crucial EQ is and tend to veer towards analytical thinking and technical skills as measures of achievement.

6. A leader will exploit opportunities while a manager avoids risk

There is always a risk in seizing an opportunity. The successful leader will instinctively be able to assess the target market, the resources required and also what the level of risk is involved. She or he will be able to build on a crisis knowing that the hard times often provide great opportunities.

Managers tend to avoid risk. They are much more concerned with helping employees reach their potential and also making sure that their objectives are met.

7. A leader needs much more charisma than a manager

If a leader can use empathy, social sensitivity and relate easily to others while displaying intelligence and charm, then she or he is considered to be charismatic. Using eye contact, appropriate touching and displaying warmth and interest through active listening; these are the marks of a charismatic person.

Advertising

Now, whether you are a manager or a leader, why not try the charisma quiz and see what your score is.

We have identified the roles and responsibilities of managers and leaders. Often, it is not so cut and dried. The roles of managers and leaders often overlap and there are many managers who are doubling up as leaders when the latter are failing to take the lead!

Featured photo credit: Sustainability for Leaders/ The Natural Step Canada . via flickr.com

More by this author

Robert Locke

Author of Ziger the Tiger Stories, a health enthusiast specializing in relationships, life improvement and mental health.

10 Morning Habits Of Happy People 10 Simple Morning Exercises to Make You Feel Great All Day What Your Fear of Being Alone Is Really About and How to Get over It Work Smarter, Not Harder: 12 Ways to Work Smart 10 Reasons Why People Are Unmotivated (And How to Be Motivated)

Trending in Work

1 9 Tips for Starting a New Job and Succeeding in Your Career 2 How to Make a Career Change at 50 for Great Opportunities 3 What Job Should You Have? 10 Questions to Help You Figure It Out 4 10 Ways to Find Your Dream Job 5 8 Characteristics of Entrepreneurship That Will Lead to Success

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on April 8, 2020

9 Tips for Starting a New Job and Succeeding in Your Career

9 Tips for Starting a New Job and Succeeding in Your Career

Congratulations, you’re starting a new job! You’re feeling relieved that the interviews and the wait for a decision from the hiring manager is over, and you’ve finally signed the offer.

Feelings of fear and anticipation may surface now as you think about starting work on Monday. Or you may feel really confident if you have plenty of work experience.

Remember to not assume that your new work environment will be similar to previous ones. It’s very common for seasoned professionals to overestimate themselves due to the breadth of their experience.

Companies offer different depths of on-boarding experiences.[1] Ultimately, success in your career depends on you.

Below are 9 tips for starting a new job and succeeding in your career.

1. Your Work Starts Before Your First Day

When you prepared for your interview, you likely did some research about the company. Now it’s time to go more in depth.

  • How would your manager like you to prepare for your first day? What are his/her expectations?
  • What other information can your manager provide so that you can start learning more about the role or company?
  • What company policies or reports can you review that can get you acclimatized to your new job and work environment?

You’ll need to embrace a lot of new people and information when you start your new job. What you learn before your first day at work can help you feel more grounded and prepare your mind to process new information.

2. Know Your Role and the Organization

Review the job posting and know your responsibilities. Sometimes, job postings are simplified versions of the job description. Ask your manager or human resources if there is a detailed job description of your role.

Once you understand your key responsibilities and accountabilities, ask yourself:

  • What questions do you have about the role?
  • What information do you need to do your job effectively?
  • Who do you need to meet and start building relationships with?

Continue to increase your knowledge and do your research through the company Intranet site, organizational charts, the media, LinkedIn profiles, the industry and who your company competitors are.

Advertising

This is not a one time event. Continue to do this throughout your time with the company. Every team or project you engage with will evolve and change.

Keep current and be ready to adapt by using your observational skills to be aware of changes to your work environment and people’s behaviour.

3. Learn the Unwritten Rules at Work

Understanding your work culture is key to help you succeed in your career.

Many of these unwritten rules will not be listed on company policies. This means you’ll need to use all of your senses to observe the environment and the people within it.

What should you wear? See what your peers and leaders are wearing. Notice everything from their jewelry down to their shoes. Once you have a good idea of the dress code you can then infuse your own style.

What are your hours of work? What do you notice about start, break and end times? Are your observations different from what you learned at the interview? What questions do you have based on your observations? Asking for clarity will help you make informed decisions and thrive in a new work setting.

What are the main communication channels?[2] What communication mediums do people use (phone, email, in-person, video)? Does the medium change in different work situations? What is your manager’s communication style and preference? These observations will help you better navigate your work environment and thrive in the workplace.

4. Be Mindful of Your Assumptions

You got the job, you’re feeling confident and are eager to show how you can contribute. Check the type of language you are using when you’re approaching your work and sharing your experiences.

I’ve heard many new employees say:

  • “I used to do this at ‘X’ company …”
  • “When I worked at “X” company we implemented this really effective process …”
  • “We did this at my other company … how come you guys are not …”
  • “Why are you doing that … we used to do this …”

People usually don’t want to hear about your past company. The experiences that you had in the past are different in this new environment.

Advertising

Remember to:

  • Notice your assumptions
  • Focus on your own work
  • Ask questions, and
  • Learn more about the situation before offering suggestions.

You can then better position yourself as a trusted resource that makes informed decisions tailored to business needs.

5. Ask Questions and Seek Clarification

Contrary to common belief, asking questions when you’re starting a new job is not a vulnerability.

Asking relevant questions related to your job and the company:

  • Helps you clarify expectations
  • Shows that you’ve done your research
  • Demonstrates your initiative to learn

Seeking to clarify and understand your environment and the people within it will help you become more effective at your job.

6. Set Clear Expectations to Develop Your Personal Brand

Starting a new job is the perfect time to set clear expectations with your manager and colleagues. Your actions and behaviors at work tells others about your work style and how you like to operate. So it’s essential to get clear on what feels natural to you at work and ensure that your own values are aligned with your work actions.

Here are a few questions to reflect on so that you can clearly articulate your intentions and follow through with consistent actions:

Where do you need to set expectations? Reflect on lessons learned from your previous work experiences. What types of expectations do you need to set so that you can succeed?

Why are you setting these expectations? You’ll likely need to provide context and justify why you’re setting these boundaries. Are your expectations reasonable? What are the impacts on the business?

What are your values? If you value work life balance, but you’re answering emails on weekends and during your vacation time, people will continue to expect this from you. What boundaries do you need to set for yourself at work?

Advertising

What do you want to be known for? This question requires some deep reflection. Do you want to be known as a leader who develops and empowers others? Maybe you want to be known for someone who creates an environment of respect where everyone can openly share ideas. Or maybe you want to be someone who challenges people to get outside their comfort zones?

7. Manage Up, Down, and Across

Understanding the work styles of those around you is key to a successful career. Particularly how you communicate and interact with your immediate manager.

Here are a few key questions to consider:

  • How can you make your manager’s job easier?
  • What can you do to anticipate her/his needs?
  • How can you keep them informed (and prepared) so they don’t get caught off-guard?
  • What are your strengths? How can you communicate these to him/her so that they fully understand your capabilities?

These questions can also apply if you manage a team or if you deal with multiple stakeholders.

8. Build Relationships Throughout the Company

It’s important to keep learning from diverse groups and individuals within the company. You’ll get different perspectives about the organization and others may be able to help you succeed in your role.

What types of relationships do you need to build? Why are you building this relationship?

Here are some examples of workplace relationships:

  • Immediate Manager. He/she controls your work assignments. The work can shape the success of your career.
  • Mentors. These are people who are knowledgeable about their field and the company. They are willing to share their experiences with you to help you navigate the workplace and even your career.
  • Direct Reports. Your staff can influence how successful you are at meeting your goals.
  • Mentees. They are another resource to help you keep informed about the organization and your opportunity to develop others.

Other workplace relationships include team members, stakeholders, or strategic partners/sponsors that will advocate for your work.

Learn more in this article: 10 Ways to Build Positive And Effective Work Relationships

9. Keep in Touch With Those in Your Existing Network

“Success isn’t about how much money you make; it’s about the difference you make in people’s lives.” – Michelle Obama

You are part of an ecosystem that has gotten you to where you are today. Every single person and each moment that you have encountered with someone has shaped who you are – both positive and negative.

Here’s How to Network So You’ll Get Way Ahead in Your Professional Life.

Make sure you continue to nurture the relationships that you value and show gratitude to those who have helped you achieve your goals.

Summing It Up

There are many aspects of your career that you are in control of. Observe, listen, and make informed decisions. Career success depends on your actions.

Remember to not assume that your new work environment will be similar to previous ones.

Here are the 9 tips for starting a new job and succeeding in your career:

  1. Your Work Starts Before Your 1st Day
  2. Know Your Role and the Organization
  3. Learn the Unwritten Rules at Work
  4. Be Mindful of Your Assumptions
  5. Ask Questions and Seek Clarification
  6. Set Clear Expectations to Develop Your Personal Brand
  7. Manage Up, Down, and Across
  8. Build Relationships Throughout the Company
  9. Keep in Touch With Those in Your Existing Network

Celebrate, enjoy your new role, and take good care of yourself!

More Tips About Succeeding in Career

Featured photo credit: Frank Romero via unsplash.com

Reference

Read Next