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7 Leadership Qualities You Need To Adopt At Work

7 Leadership Qualities You Need To Adopt At Work

Great leadership takes the strong power of personality and an assurance to make the right decision, at the right stage, for the right situation. To break through success obstacles and make a difference, you must seek a leadership role. You need to build the ability to influence and inspire others to work with you to attain your goals. Becoming a good leader requires you to understand the characteristics and responsibilities of leadership and you exercise the qualities of a great leader at work until you arise as a leader in your business life. To achieve the highest levels of performance (and create an astonishing work environment within the organization) here are the qualities you should model to inspire and encourage your team every day.

Passion

Passion is a key feature for leaders, the people who are successful and achieve great achievements. You must find passion in your work. The world’s greatest inventor and entrepreneur, Steve Jobs, left a legacy of simple, smart designs that clarified technology. He lived and performed with a sense of determination and a profusion of passion. Real passion provides inspiration. When leaders are impressively passionate, people feel involved in the leader’s commitment, part of creating important things. That satisfies on a very deep level, and it continues.

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Integrity

Integrity is the combination of external actions and internal values. A leader of integrity is the same on the outside and on the inside. Leaders are people who are respected, valued and perceived well. In any challenging situation or circumstance, employees follow and seek leaders who are honest and meet commitments. Such individuals are trustworthy because they never change direction, even when it might be essential. A leader should always look to win the trust of followers and therefore must show integrity.

Dedication

Dedication at work means spending the required time or effort to accomplish the task. A leader inspires other workers by setting examples of dedication, putting all the efforts to complete the next step toward the vision. For leaders like Bill Gates, dedication towards work reaches new levels of devotion and commitment. By leading from the front, leaders show work-fellows that by showing dedication they find more opportunities to achieve something great. Steve Jobs put together amazing teams full of talent, and squeezed every drop of their potential from them, and made tremendous products.

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Communication

In any organization, information is power, and great leaders assure the organization’s chain of command, is provided with complete and current information about the organization’s goals and objectives. To achieve this level of association, you must provide sufficient channels for two-way communication between workers and managers. You must realize and accept that clear communication is always a two-way procedure. It’s not sufficient to communicate clearly, but you have to make sure you’re being heard and understood.

Mr. Allen, a well-known leader in commercial aviation, wanted to review his approach through the crisis at Delta. Northwest CEO, John Dasburg, was in charge of communicating the message to all employees. Mr. Dasburg sent a comprehensive, three-page letter to all employees outlining the cuts and the reasons for them, which helped gain employee support for the necessary moves.

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Positive Attitude

If you are not enthusiastic about your work – your team will be the same! Great leaders display positive energy and confidence, raining on their people with a can-do attitude. A positive attitude draws co-workers’ attention and creates a way of influence, respect and appreciation from others. In leadership, positive energy has mass benefits and is a crucial factor. When you possess positivity, you think and act in terms of solutions, not problems. You take risks, become stronger and think more openly. Furthermore, you are more self-confident and your openness allows for faster, more built-up communication with other employees. This is the grounds of solid leadership.

Selflessness

A leader must have a selfless agenda, as an American Motivational Author Bob Moawad said:

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The aim of the great leader is not to get people to think more highly of the leader. It’s to make people think more highly of themselves.

A person cannot be a successful leader if he or she only values personal profit. Great leaders are selfless! They are helpers who recognize the success of others. In the presence of selfless leadership, people feel motivated not only for work but for their personal growth. Selfless leadership values others, which not only instills confidence in the team, but also helps to gather strength and support from them. When we think of selfless leaders, many big names come to mind: Steve Jobs, Gandhi, Bill Gates, King Lincoln, Stockdale, Mandela… and the list go on.

Approachability

Successful business people are comfortable connecting with other people. They easily create relationships and are more liberal. These factors give the impression of a leader, being approachable, likable and contented in their position. When workers can communicate to their boss, they are certain their boss is more concerned about them, their performance, and their productivity. Furthermore, they consider that they can be open to the boss with problems they encounter on the job without being afraid of consequences.

Featured photo credit: www.boostbusinesslancashire.co.uk via boostbusinesslancashire.co.uk

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Tayyab Babar

Tayyab is a PR/Marketing consultant. He writes about work, productivity and tech tips at Lifehack.

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Last Updated on March 30, 2020

How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

Traditionally, when you have a lot of ideas in your mind, you would create a text document, or take a sheet of paper and start writing in a linear fashion like this:

  • Intro to Visual Facilitation
    • Problem, Consequences, Solution, Benefits, Examples, Call to action
  • Structure
    • Why, What, How to, What If
  • Do It Myself?
    • Audio, Images, time-consuming, less expensive
  • Specialize Offering?
    • Built to Sell (Standard Product Offering), Options (Solving problems, Online calls, Dev projects)

This type of document quickly becomes overwhelming. It obviously lacks in clarity. It also makes it hard for you to get a full picture at a glance and see what is missing.

You always have too much information to look at, and most often you only get a partial view of the information. It’s hard to zoom out, figuratively, and to see the whole hierarchy and how everything is connected.

To see a fuller picture, create a mind map.

What Is a Mind Map?

A mind map is a simple hierarchical radial diagram. In other words, you organize your thoughts around a central idea. This technique is especially useful whenever you need to “dump your brain”, or develop an idea, a project (for example, a new product or service), a problem, a solution, etc. By capturing what you have in your head, you make space for other thoughts.

In this article, we are focusing on the basics: mind mapping using pen and paper.

The objective of a mind map is to clearly visualize all your thoughts and ideas before your eyes. Don’t complicate a mind map with too many colors or distractions. Use different colors only when they serve a purpose. Always keep a mind map simple and easy to follow.

    Image Credit: English Central

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    By following the three next steps below, you will be able to create such mind maps easily and quickly.

    3 Simple Steps to Create a Mind Map

    The three steps are:

    1. Set a central topic
    2. Add branches of related ideas
    3. Add sub-branches for more relevant ideas

    Let’s take a look at an example Verbal To Visual illustrates on the benefits of mind mapping.[1]

    Step 1 : Set a Central Topic

    Take a blank sheet of paper, write down the topic you’ve been thinking about: a problem, a decision to make, an idea to develop, or a project to clarify.

    Word it in a clear and concise manner.

      What is the first idea that comes to mind when you think of the subject for your mind map? Draw a line (straight or curved) from the central topic, and write down that idea.

        Step 3 : Add Sub-Branches for More Relevant Ideas

        Then, what does that idea make you think of? What is related to it? List it out next to it in the same way, using your pen.

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          You can always add more to it later, but that’s good for now.

          In our example, we could detail the sub-branch “Benefits” by listing those benefits in sub-branches of the branch “Benefits”. Unfortunately, we already reached the side of the sheet, so we’re out of space to do so. You could always draw a line to a white space on the page and list them there, but it’s awkward.

          Since we created this mind map on a regular letter-format sheet of paper, the quantity of information that fits in there is very limited. That is one of the main reasons why I recommend that you use software rather than pen and paper for most of the mind mapping that you do.

          Repeat Step 2 and Step 3

          Repeat steps 2 and 3 as many times as you need to flush out all of your ideas around the topic that you chose.

            I added first-level (main) branches around the central topic mostly in a clockwise fashion, from top-right to top-left. That is how, by convention, a mind map is read.

            In the next section, we are covering the three strategies to building your maps.  

            Mind Map Examples to Illustrate Mind Mapping

            You can go about creating a mind map in various ways:

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            • Branch by Branch: Adding whole branches (with all of their sub-branches), one by one.
            • Level by Level: Adding elements to the map, one level at a time. That means that firstly, you add elements around the central topic (main branches). Then, you add sub-branches to those main branches. And so on.
            • Free-Flow: Adding elements to your mind map as they come to you, in no particular order.

            Branch by Branch

            Start with the central topic, add a first branch. Focus on that branch and detail it as much as you can by adding all the sub-branches that you can think of.

              Then develop ideas branch by branch.

                A branch after another, and the mind map is complete.

                  Level by Level

                  In this “Level by Level” strategy, you first add all the elements that you can think of around the central topic, one level deep only. So here you add elements on level 1:

                    Then, go over each branch and add the immediate sub-branches (one level only). This is level 2:

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                      Idem for the next level. This is level 3. You can have as many levels as you want in a mind map. In our example, we only have 3 levels. Now the map is complete:

                        Free-Flow

                        Basically, a free flow strategy of mind mapping is to add main branches and sub-topics freely. No rules to restrict how ideas should flow in the mind map. The only thing to pay attention to is that you need to be careful about the level of the ideas you’re adding to the mind map — is it a main topic, or is it a subtopic?

                          I recommend using a combination of the “Branch by Branch” and the “Free-Flow” strategies.

                          What I normally do is I add one branch at a time, and later on review the mind map and add elements in various places to finish it. I also sometimes build level 1 (the main branches) first, then use a “Branch by Branch” approach, and later finish the map in a “Free-Flow” manner.

                          Try each strategy and combinations of strategies, and see what works best for you.

                          The Bottom Line

                          When you’re feeling stuck or when you’re just starting to think about a particular idea or project, take out a paper and start to brain dump your ideas and create a mind map. Mind mapping has the magic to clear your head and have your thoughts organized.

                          If you can’t always have access to a paper and pen, don’t worry! Creating a mind map with software is very effective and you get none of the drawbacks of pen and paper. You can also apply the above steps and strategies just the same when using a mind mapping tool on the phone and computer.

                          More Tools to Help You Organize Thoughts

                          Featured photo credit: Alvaro Reyes via unsplash.com

                          Reference

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