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Switch To Use This “Ethical” Smartphone – Fairphone

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Switch To Use This “Ethical” Smartphone – Fairphone

In the past few years, a company has taken on a very ambitious mission: producing and selling a phone that is made from materials acquired under good conditions in order to promote a fairer world economy. Fairphone describes itself as a “social enterprise with the goal of creating a fairer economy.” Driven more by ethics than by profit, the Fairphone may be of a lot of interest to people who care about the social values the company is fighting for. Learn more about the product and the company below.

The origin of Fairphone

The Fairphone company began by opening up supply chains to learn how things were made and build connections between people and the products they purchase. The goal of the Fairphone is to take on challenging issues involving the production of technology and foster discussion about what is good and right and fair. The business wishes to, more than make a few dollars, change how products are commonly made. The Fairphone’s website outlines what it describes as the road to a fairer phone. Here are a few of the steps.

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  • The Conflict-Free Tin Initiative kicked off in 2012
  • The Fairphone partnered with Closing the Loop to address recycling
  • The Fairphone participated in the responsible sourcing of minerals
  • The first Fairphone cost breakdown was conducted
  • The first Fairphones with tin were officially certified conflict-free
  • Training Guohong factory to introduce the concept of Worker Welfare was completed
  • The first Design A Day challenge kicked off for Fairphone 3D-printed cases in July 2014
  • 3D-printed cases became available for local printing
  • The newest model of the Fairphone readies for a Summer 2015 release

How a Fairphone is “fair”

Fairphone has five main areas in which it will try to instigate social impact. Those are:

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  • Mining: Fairphone wants to source materials from local economies rather than from armed militias. That effort started with acquisition conflict-free minerals from the DR Congo.
  • Design: The Fairphone is meant to last longer than the average smartphone so that buyers don’t have to keep buying new ones that might lead to extra harm to the environment.
  • Manufacturing: Factory workers receive safe conditions, fair wages and worker representation.
  • Life Cycle: Similar to the design efforts, the company is determined for the Fairphone to be reusable and recyclable to not cause any unnecessary damage to the environment.
  • Social Entrepreneurship: The transparency of the business ensures that it won’t turn into a company fueled by big payouts, but rather be held extremely accountable by its customers in case they ever stray from the mission they were born out of.

Fairphone vs. other smartphones

So how does the Fairphone compare to the iPhone, Samsung Galaxy, and other popular types of smartphones? You shouldn’t expect the world from it, for obvious reasons, but it’s pretty impressive. Its scratch-resistant screen is a little smaller than the size of the screen of an iPhone 5 and 5s, it has the same 16 GB of memory and it contains similar front and back cameras. The operating system is based on the Android 4.2.2 operating system, better known as Jelly Bean. Android has actually released two new OSs (KitKat and Lollipop) since Jelly Bean, but someone really concerned about the environment might be willing to sacrifice getting the latest software for something like Fairphone that actively tries to make a difference in the world.

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Cost and availability

Fairphone is only available in Europe right now and costs 310€, which equates to $340.10. The production of the latest model is expected to begin in May with the delivery scheduled for June or July. Visit their website if you want to be on the ground floor of a potential revolution.

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More by this author

Matt OKeefe

Matt is a marketer and writer who shares about lifestyle and productivity tips on Lifehack.

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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