Advertising
Advertising

Switch To Use This “Ethical” Smartphone – Fairphone

Switch To Use This “Ethical” Smartphone – Fairphone

In the past few years, a company has taken on a very ambitious mission: producing and selling a phone that is made from materials acquired under good conditions in order to promote a fairer world economy. Fairphone describes itself as a “social enterprise with the goal of creating a fairer economy.” Driven more by ethics than by profit, the Fairphone may be of a lot of interest to people who care about the social values the company is fighting for. Learn more about the product and the company below.

The origin of Fairphone

The Fairphone company began by opening up supply chains to learn how things were made and build connections between people and the products they purchase. The goal of the Fairphone is to take on challenging issues involving the production of technology and foster discussion about what is good and right and fair. The business wishes to, more than make a few dollars, change how products are commonly made. The Fairphone’s website outlines what it describes as the road to a fairer phone. Here are a few of the steps.

Advertising

  • The Conflict-Free Tin Initiative kicked off in 2012
  • The Fairphone partnered with Closing the Loop to address recycling
  • The Fairphone participated in the responsible sourcing of minerals
  • The first Fairphone cost breakdown was conducted
  • The first Fairphones with tin were officially certified conflict-free
  • Training Guohong factory to introduce the concept of Worker Welfare was completed
  • The first Design A Day challenge kicked off for Fairphone 3D-printed cases in July 2014
  • 3D-printed cases became available for local printing
  • The newest model of the Fairphone readies for a Summer 2015 release

How a Fairphone is “fair”

Fairphone has five main areas in which it will try to instigate social impact. Those are:

Advertising

  • Mining: Fairphone wants to source materials from local economies rather than from armed militias. That effort started with acquisition conflict-free minerals from the DR Congo.
  • Design: The Fairphone is meant to last longer than the average smartphone so that buyers don’t have to keep buying new ones that might lead to extra harm to the environment.
  • Manufacturing: Factory workers receive safe conditions, fair wages and worker representation.
  • Life Cycle: Similar to the design efforts, the company is determined for the Fairphone to be reusable and recyclable to not cause any unnecessary damage to the environment.
  • Social Entrepreneurship: The transparency of the business ensures that it won’t turn into a company fueled by big payouts, but rather be held extremely accountable by its customers in case they ever stray from the mission they were born out of.

Fairphone vs. other smartphones

So how does the Fairphone compare to the iPhone, Samsung Galaxy, and other popular types of smartphones? You shouldn’t expect the world from it, for obvious reasons, but it’s pretty impressive. Its scratch-resistant screen is a little smaller than the size of the screen of an iPhone 5 and 5s, it has the same 16 GB of memory and it contains similar front and back cameras. The operating system is based on the Android 4.2.2 operating system, better known as Jelly Bean. Android has actually released two new OSs (KitKat and Lollipop) since Jelly Bean, but someone really concerned about the environment might be willing to sacrifice getting the latest software for something like Fairphone that actively tries to make a difference in the world.

Advertising

Cost and availability

Fairphone is only available in Europe right now and costs 310€, which equates to $340.10. The production of the latest model is expected to begin in May with the delivery scheduled for June or July. Visit their website if you want to be on the ground floor of a potential revolution.

Advertising

More by this author

Matt OKeefe

Matt is a marketer and writer who shares about lifestyle and productivity tips on Lifehack.

15 Productive Things to Do When Bored (So Time Is Not Wasted) The 10 Best Online Dictionaries 15 Easy Ways For Everyone To Make Money With Social Media 7 Ways To Give Great Feedback This Is What The Cozy Home Designed By 2000 People Looks Like

Trending in Technology

1 8 Replacements for Google Notebook 2 7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively 3 7 Clever Goal Tracker Apps to Make the Most of Your Business in 2019 4 10 Smartest Productivity Software to Improve Your Work Performance 5 18 Best Time Management Apps and Tools (2019 Updated)

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

Advertising

In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

Advertising

Advertising

Read Next