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Increase Your Marketability with QR Codes for Business Cards

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Increase Your Marketability with QR Codes for Business Cards

In this day and age, many people can argue that the use of business cards are dead and over. It is believed that the likes of LinkedIn and other contact management apps have rendered them obsolete. However, studies show that business cards are more popular than ever. How is this possible? Well, one way is by sprucing up your business card by adding a QR code! Not sure what a QR code is? Let me explain.

QR codes, or Quick Response codes, are two-dimensional barcodes that can be personally designed to hold a variety of information; from addresses to websites, their uses are potentially infinite. Smart phones, Androids, iOs and tablets can scan the QR code with a QR Reader app and store the information into their device. This makes it convenient and easy for your networks to locate your information, but beyond that, it makes you memorable. It gives your business card that “wow” factor. Some people include a PDF version of their resume, others include links to LinkedIn or other related professional social media site.

To generate your own personal QR codes for your business cards, resumes or any other professional needs, check out the following two websites:

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QR Code: Example 1

    This QR Code Generator is easy to use and allows you to customize your QR Codes with text, URLs, contact information, phone numbers and SMSs. The site also gives you options of saving, sharing, and modifying the QR code.

     

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    QR Code: Example 2

       

      This QR Code Generator allows you to do more than the previous QR Code generator, not only can you customize your QR Codes with Text, URLs, Contact Information, Phone Numbers and SMSs, but there are also options for e-mails, map locations and wifi information. The site also give you options of downloading and embedding images, as well as modifying the QR code look.

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      QR codes can be added on any part of your business cards, front or back, for that dynamic touch. See examples below:

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      6841949958_f607c69530_k
        6147466432_9af23a0748_b
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            When creating a QR code, create one that works for you, your audience, and your business card template. Do not make the code too small or with light colors, or it will be difficult to hard to scan. Also keep in consideration that some people or employers may still not fully understand QR Codes, so be prepared to answer questions if they arise.

            Featured photo credit: Paul Wilkinson via flickr.com

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            Last Updated on November 25, 2021

            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

            There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

            Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

              What Does Private Browsing Do?

              When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

              For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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              The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

              The Terminal Archive

              While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

              Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

              dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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              Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

              Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

              However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

              Clearing Your Tracks

              Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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              dscacheutil -flushcache

              As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

              Other Browsers and Private Browsing

              Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

              If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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              As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

              Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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