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9 Tips to Surf the Web Like a Hacker

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9 Tips to Surf the Web Like a Hacker

Have you ever watched your grandma use the Internet? If she is anything like my grandmother, it’s painful, slow process—she always does everything the hardest way possible with the most clicks. Don’t be like your grandma. Use the following pro tips to surf the web like a hacker. We will cover everything from browser shortcuts to search engine operators that will make it easy to find anything on the Web. The average US adult spends 5 hours and 46 minutes in front of a computer, mobile phone or tablet. We spend some much of our lives using the Internet, so let’s learn some tricks to make life a little bit easier.

1. Reopen the last tab that you accidentally closed.

Use Command+Shift+T for Mac OS and Control+Shift+T for Windows. This works with Chrome and Firefox. This is perfect for when you’re comparing products on competing websites and accidentally close the wrong tab.

2. Open incognito windows to simultaneously use two Google accounts.

According to Microsoft in 2011, the average person in the US had 3 email accounts; chances are, that number has only gone up since then. A few years back, Google made all their products available to one login username. This means you can use Gmail, Hangouts, YouTube and Drive with the same username. What if your YouTube account and Gmail are on different email addresses? Instead of logging out, use a incognito window to be in both accounts at the same time. Use the short cut Command+Shift+N to open a incognito window in Chrome or a private window in Safari and Firefox.

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3. Use password mangers so you never have to remember or type in a password again.

Password managers like LastPass and Mitro are great ways to save time and frustration. Password managers work as a plug-in for Chrome or Firefox. To use them, simply sign in to a website like Facebook or Gmail and the manger will ask you if you want to save that password for future use. It works across multiple computers so you can have the same passwords saved at work and at home. Companies have the option of setting up a company account so all passwords are saved with the company and access to them is granted through the plug-in which adds security to the network.

4. Use search function site: to search any domain specifically to find a page you lost.

Screen Shot 2015-04-22 at 8.45.14 AM

    Have you ever been browsing deep in to a website at work and found something interesting that you want to share? Then later, you go back to that site and cant find the path you took to access the page. Use the search operator, site:website.com, in Google search to have google search just that site. You can add a keyword after the operator to narrow down the pages on that site. For example, the search query, “site:lifehack.org”tips to surf “should return this page. Learn more search engine operators here. 

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    5. In Chrome, leave a bookmark name empty to only display the icon and take up less space.

    Screen Shot 2015-04-22 at 8.03.43 AM

      Is your bookmark bar in Chrome getting a little too crowded? Right click a bookmark, select edit, delete the name field and leave it blank, save. This will leave what is known as the favicon which is usually the logo of the site. If you need more room on the bookmarks bar use folders to further organize.

      6. Use Adblock to filter out the advertising.

      Sick of advertisements on your favorite content sites like Mashable and Digg? Download the plug in Adblock to filter those ads out of your browsing experience. There’re products available that block ads at the network level giving you an ad free experience on any device in your home.

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      7. Hover links to see their destination pop up in the bottom left corner.

      Simply hover of a hyperlink in Chrome, then look at the bottom left corner to see where the link will take you. This is good for browsing at work and avoiding NSFW websites.

      8. Hold command when you click on a link to open it in a new tab.

      Want a link to open in a new tab but not sure if it will? Hold Command on a Mac or Control on a PC as you click to have it open in a new tab. You can also configure the scrolling wheel on your mouse to do the same function on click.

      9. Highlight a term or phrase that you want to search for in Google, right click and click “search in Google.”

      Simply highlight any term or phrase, right click and select search in Google, the Google search will open in a new tab, saving you some clicks in the process.

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      Featured photo credit: http://www.resqsoft.com/maintainable-code-2.html via resqsoft.com

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      Jared Gardner

      Founder - GearTrend.co

      Surfing the web with browser short cuts 9 Tips to Surf the Web Like a Hacker

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      Last Updated on November 25, 2021

      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

      There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

      Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

        What Does Private Browsing Do?

        When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

        For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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        The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

        The Terminal Archive

        While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

        Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

        dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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        Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

        Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

        However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

        Clearing Your Tracks

        Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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        dscacheutil -flushcache

        As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

        Other Browsers and Private Browsing

        Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

        If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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        As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

        Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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