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5 Common Social Media Misconceptions

5 Common Social Media Misconceptions

Although it may seem simple, gaining a large audience and making an impact on social media – especially for businesses – can be tricky. Time for some tough social media love. Natasha Bansgopaul of Return To Change shares the five common mistakes that people make online:

In today’s world a company’s social media plan can be found in nearly all marketing decks. First with Facebook’s IPO in 2012 and now with Twitter’s recent IPO, there’s no denying that social media is an important factor for success in this current day and age. But did you know that you may not be using it correctly?

Here are the top 5 misconceptions about social media- and some tips to right your wrongs.

1. Using Social Media Does NOT Mean You Have to Use ALL The Social Media Channels!

This is a common mistake that startups often make. Just because it is available for use, doesn’t mean you MUST create an account! Before you decide which channels you want your brand/startup to communicate through, it’s important to (1) take the time to understand what channels your consumers use and (2) how they interact with these channels. For example, a Pinterest account may not make sense for a crowdinvesting portal like Return on Change, but it would make complete sense for beauty and fashion brands interested in sharing their designs and tips to build the “right” following of folks and show them how to use their products and offerings.

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Take the time to think about WHY you should have a presence in each particular social media channel you choose to be involved with.

2. Diarrhea of Your “Social Media” Mouth Is A REAL problem!

Fact: If you talk TOO much through your channels your fan base will drop! You have to find the right balance between posting important information for your fan base, info you personally want to share, and random topics of interest that can come up in real time.  Some followings enjoy multiple messages through all channels, but these come few and far between (and still needs to be done RIGHT to work).  It comes down to knowing your audience and making sure you are providing USEFUL content, so you don’t provide them with a reason to un-follow you.

Consistency is key, not necessarily a post per new idea, a tweet per new thought, or a picture for every move of the day; but making sure that you are providing the right content through the right channels consistently, so your fan base starts to identify your brand with information they want to know vs. scrolling past your content because they are too used to seeing your hundreds of posts a day.

3. Analytics Are For People Who Aren’t Creative

You might be thinking, “Did you see my last uber creative tweet?!” No we didn’t, and neither did anyone else! You failed to realize that NO one has engaged with you through social media in quite some time. How did you not realize this?  Because you are NOT looking at your channel analytics! Every social media channel has tools to track different engagement metrics with your audience (Hootsuite, Google Analytics, Facebook Insights, etc). These tools can shed light on metrics that can give you insight. For example, with RoC, we realized when we were posting more than 5X per day, we were having fallouts from our audience through various channels. We also realized that the important things we wanted people to know weren’t breaking through enough.  We took a look at the analytics and decided to minimize the number of posts we had through certain channels as we saw the engagement metrics decrease throughout the day; and we decided to create consistent messaging for our blog posts, as we wanted people to really focus on this.

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As a result, we were able to increase our followers and increase the sharing and time spent on our blog….but we wouldn’t have known that if we didn’t look at our social media analytics!

4. Content and Titles Don’t Matter, My Friends Will Read It, They Know I’m Smart!

Well, your friends don’t matter….we mean, of course they do!  But don’t you want your messages and information to break through to others interested in your subject matter and/or company?  Your friends, no matter how great they are, will only be able to get you SO far, and you need your content and messaging to get you to the next level. So again, this goes back to creating compelling content and titles for blogs (Like 5 Misconceptions about Social Media), that can actually catch the eye of your network and draw them in to hopefully convert them as fans of your brand/startup.

You can search for titles you come up with and see if it has been done before. This can also give you new ideas about how to change your titles/content so you aren’t using the same info someone has already shared.

5. Your Brand Has A Voice….And It’s Not Necessarily YOURS

All too often, we see startups and brands posting messaging and content through their channels as if they are posting on their personal page. Your startup’s social media channels are NOT your personal channels.  I know….CEO’s just rolled their eyes at me….but it’s true! You should keep your channels separate, as your brand should have its own distinct voice and personality, which can be similar to your personal brand/voice, but it should NOT be used as one and the same.  For instance, though I may share the RoC posts on my personal FB Page, the status updates I post from my personal FB account, is NOT what we would post on the RoC Channels. I speak for myself, and RoC speaks for the company and fans.

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Take the time to understand what your brand’s voice IS and IS NOT. Use this as a gauge for when you create messaging to be shared through your channels.  Ask yourself: Self, is this me talking or my brand talking to me?

Hope you found these helpful and would love to hear your thoughts.

Return on Change is an investment platform connecting high-impact startups with investors. We work with socially innovative startups in the Tech, CleanTech, EdTech, Life Sciences, and Social Enterprise sectors, and we’re committed to helping bridge the gap between entrepreneurs and investors. See what interesting startups we work with or view investment opportunities at returnonchange.com. 

Facebook: facebook.com/returnonchange

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Blog: blog.returnonchange.com

5 Misconceptions About Social Media | Return On Change

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Siobhan Harmer

Siobhan is a passionate writer sharing about motivation and happiness tips on Lifehack.

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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