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21 Most Useful Websites Every College Student Needs To Know

21 Most Useful Websites Every College Student Needs To Know

Around 2004, I sat in on a meeting of reporters at the Akron Beacon Journal, wherein one of them asked a college student what were the hot new websites that younger people liked at the moment. “We’re all on this thing called Facebook,” she said, and it was the first time I remember hearing about the website, which – at that point in time – you needed an EDU email address to enter. Alas, college students are generally good at spotting web trends. It’s also important for them to know how to use the web effectively and to their advantage, especially as a college student who might need to ace an exam and perfect their study habits in order to gain passing grades for expensive courses. Therefore, give these 21 websites that are either growing in popularity or already well known and highly useful a try:

1. Ice Cream Apps

The Internet-based world we live in means that common web-based homework tasks need easy and fast solutions. Ice Cream Apps fills the bill by providing students the software to take care of tasks like capturing screenshots, converting video formats, making slideshows and all kinds of stuff that college students’ coursework can require.

icecreamapps

    2. Flvto

    With Flvto, students are afforded an easy way to listen to video presentations on the go, even when they don’t have Wi-Fi access or their data plans are hitting 90% and they need to lay off all that streaming because Mom and Dad are getting Verizon Wireless warnings.  If you need to write an essay about the

    “Color blind or color brave?” TED talk, for example, just plop the URL into Flvto and listen on the go. flvto

      3. Photius

      Photius is a weird little website with a throwback homepage look from the 1990s, but the best part is the fact that college students can save money on shopping by getting 20% off with a Nordstrom coupon, for example.

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      photius

        4. Slack

        Slack is a website that helps not only business people improve their communication efforts, but students as well. It integrates with DropBox, always keeps your place when you jump around various applications and it connects teams, so it can be used by study groups and project partners with open, efficient communication.

        slack

          5. Pocket

          With Pocket, college students can save articles they come across for later reading. If you’re writing a paper about “voodoo economics” for instance, it even lets you save the articles into a folder under the same name for easy reference later.

          pocket

            6. Rate My Professors

            Want to know which teachers to avoid and which professors’ classes to take? Using the website Rate My Professors, you can find real-life reviews from real college students about their real experiences with real teachers – good, bad and ugly.

            rate

              7. Glass Door

              Want to know the straight dope about what it takes to gain an internship or a permanent job position with a certain company after graduation? Check out Glass Door, wherein actual employees have left reviews about specific firms and have spilled the beans about the true corporate culture.

              glassdoor

                8. Mint

                During college, it’s especially important to know where you’re spending your cash, and Mint helps you do that for free and get supremely organized financially.

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                mint

                  9. Study Blue

                  With Study Blue, college students can use the convenient service to make flashcards that help them create notes online without wasting paper. It represents a supremely portable way to create formal study guides and freshen up prior to tests without going through piles of text.

                  studyblue

                    10. Study Hall

                    Study Hall helps students find jobs and start-ups get access to the top “hackers, hustlers and social media influencers” on college campuses.

                    studyhall

                      11. EssayTyper

                      EssayTyper is one of those confusing yet funny websites that claims it uses a combination of Wikipedia and magic to help students craft their essays fast – but also warns not to use it legitimately. If anything, the site can help spark imaginations that need to be rewritten – heavily – to likely get a passing grade. (Don’t forget, teachers have access to Copyscape, too.)

                      essaytypers

                        12. Copyscape

                        Speaking of Copyscape, it’s a great website that college students can use to check out the plagiarism level of the papers they construct. Use their premium services to copy and paste the things you’ve rewritten and essays constructed from multiple sources to ensure that it’ll fly with your teachers. There’s a nominal fee of five cents per search conducted.

                        copyscape

                          13. Overdrive

                          Who wants to pay for books when they don’t have to spend anything to read them? Thanks to Overdrive, when you discover, for example, the 10 bucks that Amazon is charging for the Kindle version of The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, use Overdrive and your local library account to have it sent to your iPad or other devices to read for free in its entirety.

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                          overdrive

                            14. OpenStudy

                            If you’re the type that doesn’t do well studying alone, use OpenStudy to meet other likeminded college students to study along with based on a variety of topics.

                            openstudy

                              15. CollegeRuled

                              Students are using CollegeRuled to make class schedules online and find their classmates in order to launch study groups and get the answers to pressing questions.

                              collegeruled

                                16. PostYourBook

                                Using PostYourBook, college students can make back some of that cash shelled out for expensive textbooks by selling them to other students, who can save money by getting discounted books.

                                postyourbook

                                  17. Go Abroad

                                  Using Go Abroad, students can learn the ins and outs of becoming an exchange student.

                                  goabroad

                                    18. The College Investor

                                    If you hate incurring student loan debt and want other financial tips that are helpful to college students, give the College Investor website a gander.

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                                    thecollegeinvestor

                                      19. College Tips

                                      College Tips calls itself a college survival guide for students.

                                      collegetips

                                        20. Hack College

                                        Using the website called Hack College, students can discover the articles written specifically from the paradigm of their campus-life plights.

                                        hackcollege

                                          21. Unigo

                                          Unigo helps students discover which colleges they should attend by providing a plethora of reviews for more than 7,000 schools, along with plenty of other helpful information.

                                          unigo

                                            Featured photo credit: education, technology and internet concept – smiling teenager in eyeglasses with laptop computer and take away coffee or tea via shutterstock.com

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                                            Last Updated on February 15, 2019

                                            7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

                                            7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

                                            Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

                                            Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

                                            Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

                                            So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

                                            Joe’s Goals

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                                              Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

                                              Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

                                              Daytum

                                                Daytum

                                                is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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                                                Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

                                                Excel or Numbers

                                                  If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

                                                  What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

                                                  Evernote

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                                                    I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

                                                    Evernote is free with a premium version available.

                                                    Access or Bento

                                                      If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

                                                      Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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                                                      You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

                                                      Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

                                                      All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

                                                      Conclusion

                                                      I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

                                                      What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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