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10 Digital Decluttering Projects You Need to Do

10 Digital Decluttering Projects You Need to Do

Digital clutter slows down your computer over time and leaves you with little space to store your files and personal data, which is why a routine e-clean up is necessary for top performance. But this clutter is also a huge, often invisible productivity-killer. The way you set up your desktop, browser, and file folders can easily be distracting you and weakening your productivity; if you’ve always had the same set up, you may not even realize how the clutter affects you.

Below are 10 digital decluttering projects to streamline your virtual work space. No, I’m not one of those people who insists you delete your social media accounts or stop reading online news in order to reduce digital clutter. Instead, these are some practical tasks that don’t just declutter, but keep you better organized, keep your files safe, and reduce the noise to get the best out of your time online.

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1. Declutter your digital documents

  • Go through all your documents and delete any that you no longer need
  • Resist the “just in case” syndrome — do you really need those old essays, or those notes from now obsolete projects? Didn’t think so.
  • If you have a lot of files and/or feel overwhelmed, organize them by date and start with the oldest documents. Break the process down into chunks so you don’t get worn out.

2. Make a zen desktop

  • Just like a clean desk helps you focus and be productive, so does a clean desktop
  • Clean up the folders and files on your desktop — get rid of app shortcuts
  • Use a sleek app launcher instead of your taskbar:
    • http://rocketdock.com/ (This is the one I personally use)
    • http://www.stardock.com/products/ObjectDock/
    • Download some sleeker-looking icons for your app launcher of choice. You can find lots of nice, clean icons on deviantArt. A few examples:
  • Make your desktop interface even prettier with Rainmeter, explained here.
  • Remember to hide default taskbar. Windows 7 instructions here, Windows 8 here, Macs here.
  • Find a minimalist/calm background. Try some of these:
    • http://simpledesktops.com/
    • http://www.lifehack.org/articles/technology/100-awesome-minimalist-wallpapers.html
    • http://www.minimalwall.com/page/2/

3. Unsubscribe from email lists/newsletters

  • Stop thinking “I may need these deals/this newsletter later!”, you won’t.
  • Best newsletters to unsubscribe from: online shopping deals. They’re constant and clog up your inbox. Try sites like RetailMeNot to check up on online shopping deals.
  • If you MUST keep some kind of newsletter for a particular site/group, update your email preferences to receive fewer updates. There’s usually a link at the bottom of newsletters to edit your email preferences (some only offer the option to unsubscribe completely, however).
  • Extra tip: For the next week or two, every time you get a newsletter open it and either unsubscribe or adjust preferences, that way you won’t get lost and overwhelmed sorting through your inbox in one go.

4. Clear out your downloads

  • If you’ve never cleaned up your Downloads folder, it’s probably taking up a good amount of storage on your computer
  • Again, if you’re overwhelmed by the sheer volume, sort files by date and delete in chunks
  • Time saver: If you’ve already backed up all important files, you can simply delete the entire contents of your Downloads folder

5. Use automated inbox sorting

  • If you use Gmail, you can set up your inbox to automatically sort your incoming emails like so.
  • SaneBox, AquaMail, and Mailbox are a few of the many third party apps that you can use to sort your inbox as well

6. Clean up your bookmarks

  • Streamline your browser window by cleaning out your bookmarks.
  • Delete what you can, then save the rest with apps like Evernote or Pocket.

7. Delete rarely used accounts

  • A great way to cut down on emails sent, time wasted, and passwords to keep track of is deleting accounts that aren’t necessary and that you don’t use often
  • JustDeleteMe provides substantial list of frequently used sites and the relative difficulty level of deleting your account on each

8. Organize and delete images

  • Organize your photos into folders by date and/or event
  • Put them in a cloud drive so you don’t have to store them on your computer (DropBox or OneDrive are good places to keep pictures and other documents)
  • Delete any photos that are poor quality or unimportant.

9. Defrag/clean disk

  • If you don’t already do this at least somewhat regularly, find your computers defrag control and do it today. (Look up how to find it on your computer if you don’t now where it is.)
  • Depending on your OS, you may need to defrag regularly, or simply schedule regular automatic defragging.
  • You can also use third party apps, like Disk Space Fan.

10. Defriend, unfollow, and in general clean out your social newsfeeds

  • Defriending on Facebook will give you just the stuff that matters on your newsfeed, so you spend less time on the site but still see what your friends and family are up to. Go through your friends list and likes pages and start defriending/unfollowing.
  • Unfollowing people on Twitter gives you just the important updates. This is important if you use or want to use twitter for news updates, be it personal interest or work-related. You can also mute people on your Twitter feed.

Remember to pace yourself through these tasks so you don’t feel overwhelmed. Use a task manager to schedule and organize the above tasks, and if you worry about getting hyperfocused or not knowing when to take a break, set timers to limit the time you spend on each project. Happy digital decluttering!

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Featured photo credit: PSD Graphics via psdgraphics.com

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Published on September 17, 2020

10 Best Monitors for Your PC Under $100

10 Best Monitors for Your PC Under $100

Are you looking for the best monitor under $100?

Whether you want it for your home office, editing photography, or gaming, you don’t need to spend big bucks on a display screen because a low budget one will certainly do the trick.[1]

We can almost hear you having second thoughts about the picture quality, but you don’t have to worry at all.[2]

Our list of the best monitors under $100 will be more than enough to cover you. Just go through it now, and you’ll find yourself a bargain.

Why You Should Trust Us

Our list incorporates some of the best low-budget monitors available in the market. Their efficiency and distinctive traits enable them to stand out from others.[3] The hand-picked ones below are incredibly slick and have a high refresh rate, fast response time, high resolution, and built-in speakers.

1. Acer Ultra Thin Frame Monitor

    Our first affordable computer screen is Acer’s 21.5-inch ultra-thin frame monitor. It has a refresh rate of 75Hz using an HDMI port and offers a full HD widescreen display.

    Its brightness can be maxed out at 250 nits. It has a slight tilt angle ranging from -5 to 15, as well as Radeon free sync technology.

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    Buy this computer monitor.

    2. Sceptre Ultra-Thin Display

      Sceptre is another company that provides excellent displays for your CPU. The screen size is a little smaller at 20 inches, but it’s made up for the slightly lower price than Acer. It also comes with two HDMI ports and built-in speakers and is wall mount ready.

      Buy this computer monitor.

      3. ViewSonic LED Monitor

      best monitor

        If you want the best monitor to set up in your office or around the house, ViewSonic’s LED screen is another good option to buy. The resolution is full HD and has a broader tilt ranging from -5 to 23 degrees.

        On top of that, the product comes with a 3-year warranty. Included in the bundle are a VGA cable, monitor, power cable, and audio cable.

        Buy this computer monitor.

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        4. ViewSonic Gaming Screen

          While we just covered a ViewSonic monitor, this one is specifically built for gaming in mind.

          Overall, this computer screen provides the same specs as the previously mentioned item. The key differences are that this one is slightly longer, comes with pre-set customizable visual modes, and offers a maxed out contrast, delivering a dynamic contrast ratio for sharp and crisp images. It also comes with a DVI cable.

          Buy this computer monitor.

          5. Asus Back Lit Monitor

          best monitor

            If you don’t mind spending a little more money, you can get an Asus Back Lit Monitor for your PC. A lot of the focus is on image quality, particularly having a strong contrast ratio and smart video technology for straight viewing. That feature also helps in reducing blue light since you’ll have more flexibility with the colors and brightness.

            Buy this computer monitor.

            6. Asus Back Lit Display

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              Another alternative to the previous Asus monitor is this one. It has a smaller contrast ratio, though it still delivers a smooth video display. You also have aspect controls, so you can adjust its display.

              Buy this computer monitor.

              7. Dell Ultrasharp Panel Monitor

              best monitor

                If you’re looking for the basic features, look no further than Dell. There’s nothing particularly fancy about this panel screen, but it does the job well for any computer.

                Its response time is 8ms, which is typical for a monitor. It can come in either silver or black.

                Buy this computer monitor.

                8. ViewSonic Frameless Monitor

                  If you liked ViewSonic’s LED monitor but wanted a little more features, we suggest looking at their frameless display. While it boasts similar specs as the brand’s other monitors, it offers color correction and dual built-in speakers, making it ideal for office and home use. It’s also 22 inches long.

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                  Buy this computer monitor.

                  9. Dell Mountable LED-Lit Monitor

                    For a dependable display with a good frame rate, Dell has a mountable, LED-lit monitor in the market. It measures 18.5 inches, has an adjustable arm, and has been through rigorous testing for long-lasting reliability. You can’t go wrong with this best monitor either.

                    Buy this computer monitor.

                    10. Sceptre Monitor

                      The final screen to cover comes from Sceptre. Compared to the ultra-thin version mentioned above, this one is available in 22 inches. Beyond that, it’s your standard display that provides decent tilting at -5 to 15 degrees, wall-mounted capabilities, 5ms response time, and built-in speakers.

                      Buy this computer monitor.

                      Final Thoughts

                      Finding one of the best monitors around can be tricky. If you’re looking for an affordable one that can last for years, consider picking a computer screen from this list.

                      Featured photo credit: Sebastian Bednarek via unsplash.com

                      Reference

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