Advertising
Advertising

Do You Use IKEA? 7 Things IKEA Has Taught Me About Life

Do You Use IKEA? 7 Things IKEA Has Taught Me About Life

No matter your background or position, everyone has an opinion on IKEA. While some love the organization, flow, pricing, and practical nature, other people hate IKEA for the exact same reasons. Wherever you fall on the IKEA love/hate scale, everyone can agree that this successful store’s approaches are one-of-a-kind. Though the unique approaches from IKEA defy conventional ones, it hasn’t slowed down the home furnishing giant in the slightest. So kickback on your Karlstad, and dust off your Norden, these life lessons from IKEA are the real deal.

1. Minimalism Rocks

ikea2 copy

    Nowhere is it more clear that minimalism is the way of the future than IKEA. Not only does minimalist designs make sense for decreased shipping costs and more efficiently design showrooms, minimalist designs are also more efficient to produce. As we increasingly see our home spaces transformed by new design elements, minimalism is one that is surely here to stay.

    Advertising

    2. It’s OK To Be Cheap

    ikea3 copy 2

      Sure IKEA furniture doesn’t always last for more than a few years, but what things do these days? The affordable products at IKEA not only make for a successful business model, it  lets a lot of us have a more comfortable life then we would otherwise be able to afford. At times when everyone is struggling to make ends meet, it’s a nice reminder to know that being cheap can be a good thing.

      3. Be More Independent

      Advertising

      3066311253_046ca20898_z

        Not everybody’s a fan of IKEA’s self-serve nature, however there’s nothing wrong with showing yourself what you can do. Sure you had to traverse four floors and carry your furniture to the till yourself, but making things is terrifically gratifying. Nothing but your sweat and tears made that couch a reality.          

        4. All You Need Is A Hexagonal Wrench

        14335177507_c76721dd1e_z

          No matter how complicated your IKEA purchase is, it seems that it always goes together with nothing more than a few screws and a tiny wrench. Those shrunken hexagons build even the largest IKEA pieces, whether it’s a couch, table or bed. It’s enough evidence to convince me at least, that you can do anything in life with willpower and a hexagonal wrench.

          Advertising

          5. Welcome Others

          20140104-152228-g

            Who can forget this adorable monkey who found his way inside of an IKEA in Canada, in 2012. In the midst of inclement weather, IKEA sheltered the monkey until an alternative home could be found. Now happy and healthy at an animal sanctuary, the monkey named Darwin was captured in a humane way. A strong reminder that it is never out of fashion to care for others.

            6. Europe’s Where It’s At

            Advertising

            7892308660_b0ca4a4ddd_z

              IKEA’s not just an innovative store with successful products, it’s also the sign of new approaches in Europe. Not only that, but IKEA tailors its presence to every market it enters. Between futuristic spaces and more innovative building designs, it never hurts to look for influences outside our own countries. Not only that, approaching all cultures with respect is crucial in understanding others.

              7. Everything Is Better With Food

              7478956730_738e16d32a_z

                IKEA is a strong testament to a universally true principal: food makes everything better. Whether you’re a bacon fanatic, a junk food lover, or the person who can never turn down a pizza, absolutely every and anything goes better with food. In fact, if they allowed it at the gym, I would even snack while working out. Another tasty reason why IKEA keeps us coming back.

                Featured photo credit: John Pastor via flickr.com

                More by this author

                Alicia Prince

                A writer, filmmaker, and artist who shares about lifestyle tips and inspirations on Lifehack.

                25 Killer Sites For Free Online Education 10 Things You Should Do If You’re Unemployed When You Start to Enjoy Being Single, These 12 Things Will Happen common words 18 Common Words That You Should Replace in Your Writing Wondering Why K Pop is So Popular? Here are 10 Reasons

                Trending in Productivity

                1 How to Live up to Your Full Potential and Succeed in Life 2 Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That) 3 8 Most Effective Games and Apps to Learn to Type Fast 4 10 Practical Ways to Improve Your Time Management Skills 5 4 Simple Steps to Brain Dump for a Smarter Brain

                Read Next

                Advertising
                Advertising
                Advertising

                Last Updated on September 11, 2019

                Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That)

                Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That)

                How often do you feel overwhelmed and disorganized in life, whether at work or home? We all seem to struggle with time management in some area of our life; one of the most common phrases besides “I love you” is “I don’t have time”. Everyone suggests working from a to-do list to start getting your life more organized, but why do these lists also have a negative connotation to them?

                Let’s say you have a strong desire to turn this situation around with all your good intentions—you may then take out a piece of paper and pen to start tackling this intangible mess with a to-do list. What usually happens, is that you either get so overwhelmed seeing everything on your list, which leaves you feeling worse than you did before, or you make the list but are completely stuck on how to execute it effectively.

                To-do lists can work for you, but if you are not using them effectively, they can actually leave you feeling more disillusioned and stressed than you did before. Think of a filing system: the concept is good, but if you merely file papers away with no structure or system, the filing system will have an adverse effect. It’s the same with to-do lists—you can put one together, but if you don’t do it right, it is a fruitless exercise.

                Why Some People Find That General To-Do Lists Don’t Work?

                Most people find that general to-do lists don’t work because:

                Advertising

                • They get so overwhelmed just by looking at all the things they need to do.
                • They don’t know how to prioritize the items on list.
                • They feel that they are continuously adding to their list but not reducing it.
                • There’s a sense of confusion seeing home tasks mixed with work tasks.

                Benefits of Using a To-Do List

                However, there are many advantages working from a to-do list:

                • You have clarity on what you need to get done.
                • You will feel less stressed because all your ‘to do’s are on paper and out of your mind.
                • It helps you to prioritize your actions.
                • You don’t overlook so many tasks and forget anything.
                • You feel more organized.
                • It helps you with planning.

                4 Golden Rules to Make a To-Do List Work

                Here are my golden rules for making a “to-do” list work:

                1. Categorize

                Studies have shown that your brain gets overwhelmed when it sees a list of 7 or 8 options; it wants to shut down.[1] For this reason, you need to work from different lists. Separate them into different categories and don’t have more than 7 or 8 tasks on each one.

                It might work well for you to have a “project” list, a “follow-up” list, and a “don’t forget” list; you will know what will work best for you, as these titles will be different for everybody.

                Advertising

                2. Add Estimations

                You don’t merely need to know what has to be done, but how long it will take as well in order to plan effectively.

                Imagine on your list you have one task that will take 30 minutes, another that could take 1 hour, and another that could take 4 hours. You need to know the moment you look at the task, otherwise you undermine your planning, so add an extra column to your list and include your estimation of how long you think the task will take, and be realistic!

                Tip: If you find it a challenge to estimate accurately, then start by building this skill on a daily basis. Estimate how long it will take to get ready, cook dinner, go for a walk, etc., and then compare this to the actual time it took you. You will start to get more accurate in your estimations.

                3. Prioritize

                To effectively select what you should work on, you need to take into consideration: priority, sequence and estimated time. Add another column to your list for priority. Divide your tasks into four categories:

                Advertising

                • Important and urgent
                • Not urgent but important
                • Not important but urgent
                • Not important or urgent

                You want to work on tasks that are urgent and important of course, but also, select some tasks that are important and not urgent. Why? Because these tasks are normally related to long-term goals, and when you only work on tasks that are urgent and important, you’ll feel like your day is spent putting out fires. You’ll end up neglecting other important areas which most often end up having negative consequences.

                Most of your time should be spent on the first two categories.

                4.  Review

                To make this list work effectively for you, it needs to become a daily tool that you use to manage your time and you review it regularly. There is no point in only having the list to record everything that you need to do, but you don’t utilize it as part of your bigger time management plan.

                For example: At the end of every week, review the list and use it to plan the week ahead. Select what you want to work on taking into consideration priority, time and sequence and then schedule these items into your calendar. Golden rule in planning: don’t schedule more than 75% of your time.

                Advertising

                Bottom Line

                So grab a pen and paper and give yourself the gift of a calm and clear mind by unloading everything in there and onto a list as now, you have all the tools you need for it to work. Knowledge is useless unless it is applied—how badly do you want more time?

                To your success!

                More to Help You Achieve More in Less Time

                Featured photo credit: Emma Matthews via unsplash.com

                Reference

                Read Next