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Top 20 TED Talks That Will Improve Your Productivity

Top 20 TED Talks That Will Improve Your Productivity
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TED covers all the best ideas over large variety of topics. However, it is time consuming to go through every single video on TED.com to discover the videos that really county. To save you time, we went through the site and created a list of TED talks about productivity. This list contains videos that can inspire you in the many different aspects of your life and boost your productivity with some brand-new ideas. These videos are short, punchy and beneficial for you life.

#1. Richard St. John: “Success is a continuous journey”

Richard St. John told us that the road to success is not a one-way street, it is a continuous journey. He shows his own business ups and downs to illustrate his key message. “When you stop trying, you fail.

#2. Eddie Obeng: Smart failure for a fast-changing world

The world is changing extremely rapidly at a speed that most people don’t realize. In this talk Eddie Obeng will show you how “smart failure” can help you to have better productivity in this fast changing era. h

#3. Arianna Huffington: How to succeed? Get more sleep

Instead of reducing your sleeping time to get more done, Arianna Huffington urges us to shut our eyes and feel the power of a good night’s sleep – because it helps us to increase productivity and happiness.

#4. Paolo Cardini: Forget multitasking, Try Monotasking

People are trying to achieve more by doing everything at the same time. Thanks to the help of smartphones, they can text, talk, surf the internet and watch video simultaneously. Designer Paolo questions the effectiveness and efficiency of multitasking and makes a product to help you focus on “monotasking.

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#5. Ernesto Sirolli: Want to help someone? Shut up and listen!

Ernesto Sirolli suggests that the first step in helping others is to listen to them.

#6. Amy Cuddy: Your body language shapes who you are

Body language not only affects how other people see us, but it also changes how we see and understand ourselves.  Amy Cuddy  shows you how “power posing” can shape your confidence level.

#7. Margaret Heffernan: Dare to disagree

Most of us tend to avoid conflicts, but Margaret Heffernan disagrees with us. She shows us that a good disagreement is central to progress.

#8. Michael Norton: How to buy happiness

Michael Norton has intriguing research on how money can actually buy happiness. In his talk, he will show you how pro-social spending can be beneficial to you.

#9. Susan Cain: The power of introverts

We are living in a world where being social and outgoing are prized. Being introvert can be difficult and shameful. In Susan Cain’s talk, she shows you how introverts can be extraordinary talents and bring unique abilities to the world.

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#10. Shawn Achor: The happy secret to better work

Psychologist Shawn Achor believe that happiness inspires productivity.

#11. Sheena Iyengar: How to make choosing easier

We all love customized experiences and options but when we are faced with 1000 options, we freeze up. In Sheena Iyengar’s research, she shows us how businesses can improve the overall experience of choosing.

#12. Daniel Goldstein: The battle between your present and future self

Daniel Goldstein created a tool that helps us to imagine the consequences from our decisions and helps us to make smarter choices.

#13. Nigel Marsh: How to make work-life balance work

Nigel Marsh lays out a perfect day, balanced between work and life and provides great encouragement to help make it happen.

#14. Caroline Casey: Looking past limits

Caroline Casey shows us her extraordinary life and how we can move beyond the limits we think we have.

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#15.  Jason Fried: Why work doesn’t happen at work

Jason Fried wants to show us the fact that the office isn’t the best place to do it. He also offers 3 suggestions on how to improve your working productivity.

#16. Jeff Bezos: What matters more than your talents

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos tell us that our character is reflected not in the gifts we’re endowed with at birth, but by our own choices we make in our life.

#17. Chip Conley: Measuring what makes life worthwhile

Chip Conley went in search of a business model based on his happiness after 2000. He learned that success comes from what you measure.

#18. Simon Sinek: How great leaders inspire action

Simon Sinek shows us a powerful, yet simple, model for inspirational leadership which can start with a golden circle and the killer question “Why?”.

#19. Gary Vaynerchuk: Do what you love (no excuses!)

There are no excuses not to do what makes you feel good because the internet has made the formula for success much easier. h

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#20. Itay Talgam: Lead like the great conductors

Itay Talgam demonstrates unique leadership which is about creating perfect harmony without saying a single word.

#Bonus. Steve Jobs: How to live before you die

An epic video of Steve Jobs that urges us to pursue our dreams and show us how to overcome obstacles in our life – including death. If you haven’t watched this video yet, here’s the chance. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=UF8uR6Z6KLc

Featured photo credit:  Christmas microphone via Shutterstock

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Brian Lee

Chief of Product Management at Lifehack

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

More on Building Habits

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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