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This Is How Successful People See Themselves As

This Is How Successful People See Themselves As
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Successful people are successful because they produce great results more often than they fail. They find new ways to do things and it seems like whatever they touch turns into gold.

Though their results are always seen by others what is not always so obvious is their thinking, the way they look at things and even more importantly the way they look at themselves. This inner part of them is actually the most important thing which makes them successful.

So, how successful people look at themselves?

1. They think they must have fun at whatever they do

It is impossible to do something successfully while being bored by it. It just doesn’t work that way. Having fun at work takes out all the stress from even the most difficult tasks.

One of the greatest ambassadors of fun at work and always enjoying at whatever he is doing is a business wizard, Richard Branson. He is an epitome of a mixer of success and pure enjoyment.

 “Fun is one of the most important – and underrated – ingredients of any business.” – Richard Branson

2. They think there is always something new they have to learn

Successful people never stop learning from the others and also from their failures. They know that in order to find new ways of doing things they have to be open for the new knowledge.

So they think of themselves as constant learners.

“Stay hungry, stay foolish.” – Steve Jobs

3. They consider themselves as very disciplined

In order to reach their goals, successful people know they have to discipline their lives. They do things which others don’t like doing it and cancel things which distract their focus.

Successful people don’t spend hours watching TV or spend hours drinking in a pub chatting about the weather and politics. They rather spend their time productively, like focusing on their present job or taking care of their body.

“Discipline is the bridge between goals and accomplishments” – Jim Rohn

 4. They think they have to leave a mark in this life

Successful people have the inner urge to think not just how to improve their own life but also how to improve other’s people lives. They know that they are here because they have to make some improvements by doing new products which make other people’s life easier or by changing old patterns of thinking.

A good example of such successful person is Nelson Mandela who despite being imprisoned for 27 years have stopped the apartheid in South Africa and improved the lives of millions of people.

5. They never think of themselves as failures (even if they fail)

“Our greatest glory is not in never failing but in rising every time we fail” Confucius

Successful people never take a failure personally.
If they are selling something they know that when people say to them “no” they just mean “not yet”. So they go ahead with no bad feelings.
If they fail sometimes in their life or in business they take it just as a part of the process and they use a failure to learn something from.

Henry Ford failed and went broke five times before he succeeded.

 6. They see themselves as great fighters

Successful people know life is full of challenges so they don’t stop at the first obstacle which comes on their way. They don’t accept any circumstances for not succeeding. Their second nature is being great fighters for their ideals.

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One of the most prominent examples of a great fighter is Oprah Winfrey. She was born in poverty. She was sexually abused as a child by her relative so she would have enough reasons for pitying herself – if she wasn’t thinking she can fight her way against all the odds right to the top.

7. They think they are very passionate

Passion is the fuel of any successful man or woman. They are addicted to it. They put all their feelings in the thing they do. Their passion helps them cross all the obstacles on their way to success no matter how big the obstacle is. Their passion is always bigger than the barrier in front of them.

“You have to have a lot of passion for what you are doing because it is so hard… if you don’t any rational person would give up” – Steve Jobs

8. They think of themselves as risk takers (and never regret it)

Every successful person knows that sometimes you just have to cross the line when nobody else wishes to do so. They know that risk-taking is part of success and if they fail, they never regret it. They trust so much their risk-taking nature that they know there will be always more wins than failures in their life.

9. They see themselves as very spiritual people

Successful people are concessions that there is more in life than only their physical presence. They feel they need some guidance on their way to success and that the best guidance always comes from within.

They take great care of their spiritual life by reading motivational books, attending self-development seminars, meditating and constantly practicing their gratitude.

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10. They see themselves as resourceful

Successful people always look for the solutions. They don’t accept answers like “It can’t be done” or “It is too hard to do it.”

Because successful people think of themselves as being resourceful they naturally look for new ways to do things. They know there is always a solution for just any problem.

A good example of a very resourceful and successful person is Elon Musk, founder of PayPal, Tesla cars and SpaceX. While other big companies like Toyota were concerned just how to make good enough electrical cars he concentrated on finding the solutions how to make fast electrical cars.

11. They think of themselves as givers

Successful people know that the more you give more you receive so they are usually great philanthropists.

Successful rapper 50′ Cent and well-known motivational speaker Anthony Robbins joined their forces with Feeding America to help providing meals for families across America in order to solve domestic hunger.

So if you want to improve results you have in your life right now and become (even more) successful think of the way you see yourself and try to improve some thought patterns which might hold you back.

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All the best on your way to your success!

Featured photo credit: John P. via onemansblog.com

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Bo Nardin

Bo Nardin is an online entrepreneur taking the idea 'Turn your passion into a profession' online.

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

More on Building Habits

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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