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How to Be More Productive in Anything and Everything You Do

How to Be More Productive in Anything and Everything You Do

Picture this: Two people—let’s call them Billy and Betty—both work at the same marketing firm. They have the exact same job description and work load and they both sit at their desks and perform pretty much the same sets of tasks. But at the end of the each day, Betty always outperforms Billy. She makes more calls, closes more deals, and delivers better results.

Is Betty smarter than her co-worker? Not really. Is Billy given fewer hours each day? Nope. After all, one of the indisputable laws of the universe is that every person on Earth, regardless of the amount of money they have or where they are in the world, gets 24 hours in each day.

Betty gets more things done each day because she knows how to use her time well. She applies specific productivity techniques and time management strategies that let enable her to get things done quickly and easily.

How would you like to be the Betty of your workplace? Follow the tips below and you’ll be well on your way to becoming more productive and doing more in less time.

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Jot down your goals

Develop the habit of writing down your goals and tasks. Write down your tasks every morning (or the night before) and let that to-do list guide you throughout the day.

Do the same thing at a larger scale. What do you plan to accomplish by the end of the month? Where do you want to be in 6 months or a year’s time? Think about the answers to those questions, cook up a plan on how to achieve them, and put that plan on paper.

Having your goals on paper and keeping them in front of you helps you stay focused on what you need to do. Your to-do list will give your day more structure. It will help keep you on track so you won’t deviate to doing unnecessary tasks or things that aren’t part of your plan.

Break things down

Got a big major task sitting in front of you? Don’t stare helplessly at it. Instead, bring out your (metaphorical) samurai sword and cut that assignment down into bite-sized pieces.

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The key to not getting overwhelmed with the whirlwind of tasks sitting on your plate is to break them down into small, manageable tasks. Focus on one part at a time, and finish doing each part before moving on to the next one.

Think of it this way: If you’re planning a wedding, it wouldn’t be wise to select your officiant, choose a caterer, book your venue, and send out your invitations all in one day right? (Unless you want to go crazy.) Nope, you handle those tasks one by one by taking care of the most pressing ones first, like selecting a venue, before moving on to the next task.

Don’t multi-task

Don’t fall into the trap of thinking that you’ll get more things done faster if you do them all at the same time. Doing so only leads to confusion and overwhelm so avoid multitasking when you can.

Instead, do only ONE thing at a time and stick to that task until you’re done with it.

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Automate

Make a list of the routine tasks that you perform and see which ones you can automate. For instance, I use a service that automatically shares my latest blog post on Facebook and Twitter, so I don’t have to manually do so.

Get rid of all that clutter

Clutter is one of the top enemies of productivity. All those scattered post-its, paper scraps, and magazines on your desk are distracting you (both at a conscious and subconscious level) and keeping your from getting things done.

A tidy work environment is conducive to productivity. You’ll find that neatness and efficiency go hand-in-hand, so always be vigilant when it comes to cleaning up the clutter around you.

Do tasks in batches

I picked up this tip from Tim Ferriss’ book, The 4-Hour Workweek, and I have to say, it works like a charm. Doing tasks in batches means grouping similar tasks together and performing them within the same time frame.

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For example, when paying your bills, it’s better to round up all your invoices and pay them in one sitting, rather than choosing to pay your phone bill in the morning, your internet bill in the afternoon, and your credit card the next day.

Batching helps you accomplish tasks quickly and more efficiently because it saves your body the time and effort from having to switch gears from one task to the next.

Use tools if you need to

There are numerous productivity tools out there designed to help you save time and get more things done. Check out the productivity category of your app store and see which apps can help you be more efficient.

One of my personal favorites is RescueTime, a software that keeps track of your computer’s activity to help you determine how effective you are in managing your time. Then there’s Evernote, the app that lets me keep save and track my tasks and notes across multiple devices.

What do you do to stay productive? Do you use any special tools or apps? Share them in the comments below.

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Last Updated on July 16, 2020

How Does Setting Goals Lead to Success?

How Does Setting Goals Lead to Success?

As well as being the founder of Lifehack, I also help people on a one-to-one basis through life coaching.

I’ve been doing this for more than 10 years now and have helped hundreds of clients reevaluate their lives and turn inertia into progress and failure into success.

A common theme I’ve noticed with many of my clients is that they don’t have any definite goals to aim towards.

This has always surprised me, as goal setting is frequently recommended by self-improvement gurus, performance coaches, and business leaders. It’s also something that I learned at university and have implemented successfully in my life ever since.

If you’re similar to the majority of my life coaching clients and you don’t have any definite goals to aim for, then you’re missing out on what is probably the most powerful personal success technique on the planet.

The good news is—you’ve come to the right place for help with this.

In this article, I’ll explain exactly what goal-setting is and how you can put it into action in your life. As you’ll discover, it’s a key that can open many doors for you.

An Introduction to Goal Setting

Goals can be big, small, short-term, long-term, essential, or desirable. But they all share one thing: They will give you something to aim for.

This is important. As just like a ship without a destination, if you have no goals, you’ll end drifting aimlessly.

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Goals give you purpose. They also give you drive and enthusiasm. In other words—they make you feel alive!

If you’ve never spent time setting goals before, then here’s what I recommend you to do:

  1. Take some time to evaluate all areas of your life (health, career, family, etc.).
  2. Determine which of these areas need a boost.
  3. Think of ways in which to achieve this (for example, if you want to boost your health, you could eat less and exercise more).
  4. Set some definite goals that you would like to achieve.
  5. Write down these goals, including the date you want to accomplish them by.

Now, before you get started on the above, I want to make one thing clear: Goals are not wishful thinking!

By this, I mean that while your goals should be ambitious, they shouldn’t be unrealistic or verging into fantasy land.

For example, wanting to be promoted at work would be a realistic goal while wanting to be President of the United States might not be. (Of course, feel free to prove me wrong!)

If you’re new to the world of goal setting, then I’d recommend you start with easy-to-achieve goals. These could be things such as eating a healthy breakfast, walking more, taking regular breaks from your screen, and sleeping early.

These simple goals might take you a month or so to achieve, including making the daily practices a habit.

Once you’ve successfully accomplished these goals, you’ll find your self-confidence grows, and you’ll be ready to set yourself some bigger goals.

Here are a few examples that you might want to choose or adapt to your personal circumstances:

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  • Run a marathon
  • Buy a new car
  • Learn a new language
  • Travel around the world
  • Change career
  • Retire early
  • Write a book

I’m sure you can think of many more things that you would like to achieve. As the famous Shakespeare line neatly states: “The world is your oyster!”

Now, the trick with big goals (as I’ll show in an example shortly) is to break them down into small, bite-sized chunks. This means you’ll have a big end goal, with smaller goals (sometimes referred to as objectives) helping you to gradually achieve your main aim.

When you do this, you’ll make big goals more achievable. Plus, you’ll have an easy way to track how far along the road to your goal you are at any given point in time.

Let’s see this in action…

Going from an Idea to a Global Success

Everything starts with an idea.

And there appears to be no shortage of good ideas in the world. But there is a shortage of people willing to put these ideas into action!

This is the essential step that will move you from being a dreamer to an achiever.

Back in 2005, when I first had the idea for Lifehack, I really only considered it to be a platform to record some of my productivity and self-improvement techniques. I’d developed these during my time at university and as a Software Engineer at Redhat.

However, based on the number of views and positive feedback I received on the first few articles, I quickly realized that Lifehack had the potential to be a popular and successful website—a site that could help transform the lives of people from all across the world.

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It was at that point that I decided to set some goals in place for Lifehack.

The way I did this was to set specific targets for different areas of the business:

  1. Number of articles published
  2. Amount of time spent writing and promoting the articles
  3. Number of new readers
  4. Number of new email subscribers
  5. Revenue generated from ads

For each of the above, I set weekly, monthly, and yearly targets. These targets were realistic but were also ambitious. In addition, I wrote down the necessary steps to take to achieve each target within the specified time frame.

This goal setting had a powerful impact on my motivation and energy levels. Because I could clearly see what needed to be done to achieve each goal, I found a purpose to my tasks that made them exciting to complete. Each small target achieved took me closer to accomplishing the bigger goals.

For example, my initial goals for writing articles were for just five a week, which equated to 20 per month and just over 100 per year. However, as I dedicated more and more time to Lifehack, I found I was able to exceed my initial goals.

This led me to increase the numbers. Of course, there’s a limit to how many articles one person can write. So when the readership began to exponentially increase, I started to hire other writers to help me out with the site’s content.

From my initial goal of just over 100 articles per year, I’ve used goal setting to help Lifehack publish more than 35,000 articles to date. This is now the largest collection of original self-development articles in the world.

And in terms of readership—this has skyrocketed from a few dozen in 2005 to several million in 2020.

And of course, I have many new goals for Lifehack, including expanding our range of online courses.

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My original goal has always remained the same though: To change people’s lives for the better.

Goal Setting Can Transform Your Life

If you haven’t yet experienced the incredible power of goal setting, then now’s the time to get started.

Build a definite picture of what you want to accomplish, break it down into small, achievable steps, and then start taking action!

You’ll be able to change all areas of your life using this method, including boosting your health, improving your relationships, and transforming your career. You may also want to use goal setting to start a new hobby or plot a path to a prosperous and peaceful retirement.

So please don’t wait for success to drop in your lap (which it is highly unlikely to do). Instead, decide on exactly what you want, then make a plan to get it. This is the secret to lifelong success.

Legendary motivational speaker and author Paul J. Meyer said it well:

“Goal setting is the most important aspect of all improvement and personal development plans. It is the key to all fulfillment and achievement.”

Final Thoughts

Now, let me leave you with five questions that will help you think about your future:

  1. What would you like to be doing in 3, 5, and 7 years?
  2. What things make you happiest?
  3. How can you share your knowledge and experience?
  4. Who can help you achieve your goals?
  5. What would you like to be your legacy?

Take plenty of time to think about these questions. When the answers come, you’ll be able to start building a picture of how you’d like your life to be—and what goals you need to set to make this picture a reality.

More Tips on Setting Goals

Featured photo credit: Jealous Weekends via unsplash.com

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