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8 Differences Between You And Someone Who Is Successful

8 Differences Between You And Someone Who Is Successful
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Success is such a lucrative term. Everyone dreams of it. Many have achieved it, while many more never do. What is success?

True success is not an actual “…termination of attempts…”, nor does it necessarily involve a monetary outcome. Far more success , like stated on UrbanDictionary.com, “...it simply means to follow through…success is a journey not a destination.” My definition of success is the sum of an infinite amount of tasks and failures performed while moving towards a specific direction in life. Success is a never-ending process. If you get to point B and stop, you never see what lies ahead at point C, D, and E.

Truly successful people maintain certain habits that keep them on a productive path. They never stop at any point along the way. Their goals evolve and grow. Just as mankind has evolved and adapted, your personal definition of success (or goal) should too. Successful people never strive for perfection, they strive to grow their knowledge and continue to improve their skills.

In order to be a success, one must change their habits. What are the differences between you right now and people who maintain success? Here are 8 differences between you and them:

1. Successful people never stop learning.

Think about how much technology has changed and evolved over the years. Your knowledge of a particular subject may be complete and up-to-date today, but tomorrow someone else may have discovered a new way to do it, a better way to do it, or something no one knew about it. To maintain success in a certain area, you have to continually research, study, learn, and experiment on that particular subject. Successful people have a hunger for learning and obtaining knowledge.

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Many unsuccessful people equate learning with school – which is incorrect. Learning can be obtained from life experiences, researching on your own, shadowing a mentor, on-the-job training, running experiments, relationships, reading, and so on. Try to learn something new everyday.

2. Successful people set specific life goals

Successful individuals set out on predetermined paths. They know what they want to gain, where they intend on going, and they have their course drawn out. They have set short-term and long-term goals for themselves. Successful people write down their goals, and organize their journey by making to-do lists. Everyday they wake up with a purpose. No time is wasted. Nothing can distract them. Successful people pre-plan their days and will get everything they set out to do done.

Others tend to be more laid back and procrastinate. If you want to be successful, you cannot have a nonchalant attitude. Usually when you have defined your goals, and you are passionate about it, it’s easy to get things done. The reason is that your goal is something you truly desire, and you know the everyday tasks you choose to complete will take you closer to achieving it. Make you goal something you absolutely have to do to ensure a happy life, and the hard work will not be so hard.

3. Successful people embrace difficulties

Failures, problems, obstacles- whatever synonym you call them, successful people face difficulties head on. Those who are successful, are considered problem solvers. They enjoy finding solutions for life’s challenges. Think about famous people who you consider “go-to” people in different fields. Ask yourself, “Who would I want advice from?”

Here’s a few from my list:

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  • Psychology – Dr. Phil
  • Business – Richard Branson
  • Technology – Steve Jobs
  • Branding/Celebrity – Oprah Whinfrey
  • Cooking – Rachael Ray
  • Comedy – Steve Harvey
  • Crafting – Martha Stewart

These celebrities may not be first on your list, but you have definitely heard of them and know exactly why they are famous. They are considered experts in their particular realms. These people continually provide solutions for everyday challenges and lead by example.

Let’s not get these highly successful celebrities confused with what success looks like. You do not need to make it to their level to be considered successful. All I am saying is follow their example. If you work as hard as they have, push past the challenges in your life as they have, and never quit, you too will successfully conquer your dreams and be known on some level in your field, as a problem solver.

4. Successful people remain humble

People who are highly successful do not take their success for granted. They know it was not luck that brought them to success. These people never forget where they began and the hard work they undertook to achieve it. Yes, you may see successful people self promoting, but that is all part of the marketing game. Confidence envelops success, not imperiousness.

Others tend to boast and brag about their accomplishments. I am not referring to the level of triumph as the people I listed above. Those who are not successful tend to gasconade about simple everyday, expected, feats. You do not gain respect from anyone with conceit. If the desired result of your effort happens, make sure you exude assurance with your work, but not by gloating afterwards. Conceit shows dubious tendencies, while confidence shows unwavering expertism.

5. Successful people support others

Those who have achieved success, have not done so by caching their knowledge. They are not egocentric. They believe that the more successful people there are, the better the world will be. They volunteer to help those less fortunate. Greed is not a motivating factor for them. They do not think in terms of parsimony, they encompass a yearning to bestow what they have and know to others. Donating their time, skills, wealth, and knowledge to others also helps them remain modest.

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Others lust over their prosperity in an autocratic manner. They trove their abilities to hinder others from acquiring success. They are prone to step on others to advance in life. They are consumed with only their quality of life. Avarice will impede success. Human beings are programmed with a survival of the fittest mentality. You must fight this and realize you have to give, in order to receive.

6. Successful people control their thoughts and emotions

Those who are successful, have always sustained a positive outlook despite their circumstances. They become conscious of self calamitous thoughts and habits. The successful people overcome debilitating emotional trauma from the past, and live for today.

Unsuccessful people live in the past. They subconsciously replay emotional trauma they have endeared in current life situations. You have to realize that your outer being reflects your inner state. You must find peace within by forgiving those who have caused you pain, and moving on with your life.

7.  Successful people have a balanced life

Those who are successful cherish their time spent with loved ones. They know these people support them and love them no matter what. They know there must be a balance between work and personal time to be happy and peaceful.

Others who are not successful, or those trying to figure out how to be, tend to focus too much time on one or the other. If you have too much personal time, you are not working hard enough to become successful. If you work too much, you will be unhappy and stressed, which will affect your work life. There must be a balance between the two. Find your balance.

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8. Successful people avoid negative energy

Successful people live life with a positive attitude. Unfortunate situations happen to everyone, but they always find the silver lining. They choose who they let into their life wisely. Those who do not support them, who use them, who have a negative attitude, who try to knock them down, and who are envious of them, are not welcomed.

Others find it challenging to let go of negative relationships. This may be because of their low self esteem. This may be the result of fear of being companionless. You must exude confidence and confront your aversions to find success in life.

I am not pointing out these eight differences between successful people and you in order to dismay you. I am simply showing you eight feasible adjustments you can make to transform your life. The biggest step you will take to accomplish these changes is simply taking action and making the effort. You can do it!

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

More on Building Habits

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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