Advertising
Advertising

7 Steps You Need To Take To Be Creative At Work

7 Steps You Need To Take To Be Creative At Work

It is easy to get into a rut at work. The longer you have been doing the job, the greater the tendency to keep doing things the way you have always done them. That is, easy and straightforward—and boring.

In almost every job there are opportunities for creativity and innovation—sometimes they are small procedural improvements, and sometimes they are big, risky innovations. How can you put some imagination and creativity into your work? Here are seven key steps:

Advertising

1.  Recognize that every product, every service, every method and every aspect of your job can be done differently and better. 

Think of the service of providing music to music fans. Once it was done only through live performances. You had to go to a drafty hall, sit still and listen. Then we had vinyl records. Then tape cassettes, followed by CDs. Now we can listen to music downloads on our cell phones as we walk in the park. It’s the same with industrial, office and business processes: each gets replaced by something better. Approach every task with the attitude that the current method is temporary and that your job is to find a better way to do it.

2. Ask people.

Ask customers what problems and issues they have with your products or services. Ask suppliers for ideas for cost savings and quality improvements. Ask colleagues in other departments what could be improved. People in other places have other viewpoints and can see problems, gaps and opportunities that you can’t see. Network outside of work with people in other fields and discuss their approaches to some of the topics that concern you.

Advertising

3.  Run regular brainstorms.

A well-facilitated ideation session or brainstorm with a diverse team will generate plenty of great ideas for any business challenge. You should hold them often with your team (and a sprinkling of provocative outsiders) to tackle the issues that are crying out for fresh approaches. Start with a clear statement of the issue and some broad criteria for what a good solution might look like. Turn the brainstorms into action by implementing the best ideas.

4.  Look far outside.

How do other organizations in different fields tackle the sorts of challenges that you face? What do they do in the entertainment industry, or in retail, or in charities? What do businesses similar to yours but in Singapore, Holland or Shanghai do? Research them on the internet. Can you implement some of their great ideas and apply them locally?

Advertising

5.  Discuss issues and ideas with your boss.

Find out what his or her big issues are. What is the corporate strategy? Maybe you can contribute a few ideas of your own that will help your manager or the company at large. Talk about the challenges and your proposals and suggestions. Show that you are a positive contributor of ideas.

6.  Build prototypes.

Show people how an idea would work in practice with a mock-up or a prototype. Ask for their input and ideas. Make the idea real and you will get feedback. Test new product and service ideas with customers.

Advertising

7.  Change your attitude to failure.

If everything you try works then you are not being bold enough. Innovation involves trying some things that don’t work. Treat each failure as a learning opportunity. The innovator’s motto is: “I succeed or I learn, but I never fail.”

Every CEO says the same thing, “We need more innovation here.” Yet everywhere we see people frightened to try new things. We tend to think that it is just the marketing or R&D departments that should be creative. The truth is that we desperately need creative thinking everywhere in our workplaces. It can start with you!

More by this author

Paul Sloane

Professional Keynote Speaker, Author, Innovation Expert

How to Win an Argument – Dos, Don’ts and Sneaky Tactics How to Get Rich: 11 Bold Moves That Guarantee Wealth How to be a Brilliant Conversationalist Think Laterally Write A Killer Resume In Seven Easy Steps

Trending in Productivity

1 7 Signs That You’re Way Too Busy 2 How to Become a Morning Person: 8 Steps to Kickstart 3 15 Productive Things to Do When Bored (So Time Is Not Wasted) 4 How to Be More Productive: 4 Tiny Tweaks to Make 5 What Is the 80 20 Rule (And How to Use It to Boost Productivity)

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on November 19, 2019

7 Signs That You’re Way Too Busy

7 Signs That You’re Way Too Busy

“Busy” used to be a fair description of the typical schedule. More and more, though, “busy” simply doesn’t cut it.

“Busy” has been replaced with “too busy”, “far too busy”, or “absolutely buried.” It’s true that being productive often means being busy…but it’s only true up to a point.

As you likely know from personal experience, you can become so busy that you reach a tipping point…a point where your life tips over and falls apart because you can no longer withstand the weight of your commitments.

Once you’ve reached that point, it becomes fairly obvious that you’ve over-committed yourself.

Advertising

The trick, though, is to recognize the signs of “too busy” before you reach that tipping point. A little self-assessment and some proactive schedule-thinning can prevent you from having that meltdown.

To help you in that self-assessment, here are 7 signs that you’re way too busy:

1. You Can’t Remember the Last Time You Took a Day Off

Occasional periods of rest are not unproductive, they are essential to productivity. Extended periods of non-stop activity result in fatigue, and fatigue results in lower-quality output. As Sydney J. Harris once said,

“The time to relax is when you don’t have time for it.”

2. Those Closest to You Have Stopped Asking for Your Time

Why? They simply know that you have no time to give them. Your loved ones will be persistent for a long time, but once you reach the point where they’ve stopped asking, you’ve reached a dangerous level of busy.

3. Activities like Eating Are Always Done in Tandem with Other Tasks

If you constantly find yourself using meal times, car rides, etc. as times to catch up on emails, phone calls, or calendar readjustments, it’s time to lighten the load.

It’s one thing to use your time efficiently. It’s a whole different ballgame, though, when you have so little time that you can’t even focus on feeding yourself.

4. You’re Consistently More Tired When You Get up in the Morning Than You Are When You Go to Bed

One of the surest signs of an overloaded schedule is morning fatigue. This is a good indication that you’ve not rested well during the night, which is a good sign that you’ve got way too much on your mind.

Advertising

If you’ve got so much to do that you can’t even shut your mind down when you’re laying in bed, you’re too busy.

5. The Most Exercise You Get Is Sprinting from One Commitment to the Next

It’s proven that exercise promotes healthy lives. If you don’t care about that, that’s one thing. If you’d like to exercise, though, but you just don’t have time for it, you’re too busy.

If the closest thing you get to exercise is running from your office to your car because you’re late for your ninth appointment of the day, it’s time to slow down.

Try these 5 Ways to Find Time for Exercise.

Advertising

6. You Dread Getting up in the Morning

If your days are so crammed full that you literally dread even starting them, you’re too busy. A new day should hold at least a small level of refreshment and excitement. Scale back until you find that place again.

7. “Survival Mode” Is Your Only Mode

If you can’t remember what it feels like to be ahead of schedule, or at least “caught up”, you’re too busy.

So, How To Get out of Busyness?

Take a look at these articles to help you get unstuck:

Featured photo credit: Khara Woods via unsplash.com

Advertising

Read Next