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7 Excuses You Make That Make Breaking Bad Habits So Difficult

7 Excuses You Make That Make Breaking Bad Habits So Difficult

Bad habits can be very difficult to break. However, with enough inner motivation and persistence, you can emerge victorious. The first step to ditching a bad habit is identifying the excuses that make them so difficult to break.

But I tried to quit – it’s just too hard!

Trying to quit a bad habit is admirable. However, long term success is out of reach without patience. Breaking bad habits can take time and focus. It may even require more than one try. Do not give up trying to break a bad habit just because you weren’t successful on your first attempt. Focus on your goal and keep trying until you’ve conquered it.

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But my habit is not hurting anyone else.

This is a common excuse for individuals battling with habits that abuse the body. It is important to realize that bad habits can have a domino effect. Regardless of the excuses you make, if a habit affects you negatively, then it also affects the ones who love you. So be proactive in breaking your habit. Enlist the help of those who care about your well-being. You don’t have to fight your habits alone.

But I have to do this because I can’t help myself.

You can only conquer your bad habits when you make it your aim to take responsibility for your own choices. At some point you’ll need to stop the carriage ride and take the reins. Eliminate “I can’t” from your vocabulary, and refuse to give in to your habits.

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But since I’m still young, I have plenty of time to quit.

If a habit is bad for your health, then it is never too soon to eradicate it. Regardless of your age, you need your body to continue working properly in order to continue living! Youth is not an excuse to procrastinate. Youth is actually the best time to quit a harmful habit. If you stop while you’re still young, you won’t have to risk ruining your body and even shortening your overall life expectancy.

But I don’t even have a bad habit.

Denial is at the root of many bad habits. If you do not acknowledge your bad habit, you will not be able to get rid of it. Accepting the fact that you have a bad habit is the first step in eliminating it. Acknowledge your weakness and then strive to rise above it.

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But it can’t be that bad because my friends still do it.

Do your friends know everything? Certainly not! Your friends do not know the answers to all of life’s questions. You are the expert on yourself, and you do not need someone else to dictate which habit you’ll keep and which habit you’ll break. Make it your determination to stop hiding behind your friends and ditch this excuse. Regardless of your age, birds of a feather flock together. So while your friends may very well be embracing their bad habit, but that does not mean that you must do the same thing.  Do your own research and allow your findings to motivate you to break your bad habit right away.

But my habits aren’t serious.

Downplaying the importance of a habit is a very common excuse. In some cases bad habits can pose a threat on a day to day basis. Research your habit and speak to an expert. If your habit truly is serious, then the truth will come out. Recognize the seriousness of the bad habit, and be determined to eliminate it once and for all.

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Excuses impede progress. Once you learn how to identify your excuses, you will be on your way to eradicating bad habits for good.

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Last Updated on May 20, 2019

How to Prevent Inaction from Leading to Regret

How to Prevent Inaction from Leading to Regret

Time.

When you think of this construct, where do you see your time being spent?

As William Shakespeare famously wrote “I wasted time, and now doth time waste me…”

Have you used your time wisely? Are you where you want to be?

Or do you have unfinished goals to attain… places you want to be, things you still need to do?

The hard truth is, that time once passed cannot be replaced–which is why it is common to hear people say that one should not squander time doing nothing, or delay certain decisions for later. More often than not, the biggest blocker from reaching our goals is often inaction – which is essentially doing nothing, rather than doing something. 

There are many reasons why we may not do something. Most often it boils down to adequate time. We may feel we don’t have enough time, or that it’s never quite the right time to pursue our goals.

Maybe next month, or maybe next year…

And, before you know it, the time has passed and you’re still no where near achieving those goals you dream about. This inaction often leads to strong regret once we look at the situation through hindsight. So, take some time now to reflect on any goal(s) you may have in mind, or hidden at the back of your mind; and, think about how you can truly start working on them now, and not later.

So, how do you start?

Figure Out Your Purpose (Your Main Goal)


The first important step is to figure out your purpose, or your main goal.

What is it that you’re after in life? And, are there any barriers preventing you from reaching your goal? These are good questions to ask when it comes to figuring out how (and for what purpose) you are spending your time.

Your purpose will guide you, and it will ensure your time spent is within the bounds of what you actually want to accomplish.

A good amount of research has been done on how we as humans develop and embrace long-term and highly meaningful goals in our lives. So much so, that having a purpose has connections to reduced stroke, and heart attack. It turns out, our desire to accomplish goals actually has an evolutionary connection–especially goals with a greater purpose to them. This is because a greater purpose often helps both the individual, and our species as a whole, survive.

Knowing why it is you’re doing something is important; and, when you do, it will be easier to budget your time and effort into pursuing after those milestones or tasks that will lead to the accomplishment of your main goal.

Assess Your Current Time Spent

Next comes the actual time usage. Once you know what your main goal is, you’ll want to make the most of the time you have now. It’s good to know how you’re currently spending your time, so that you can start making improvements and easily assess what can stay and what can go in your day to day routine.

For just one day, ideally on a day when you’d like to be more productive, I encourage you to record a time journal, down to the quarter hour if you can manage. You may be quite surprised at how little things—such as checking social media, answering emails that could wait, or idling at the water cooler or office pantry —can add up to a lot of wasted time.

To get you started, I recommend you check out this quick self assessment to assess your current productivity: Want To Know How Much You’re Getting Done In A Day?

Tricks to Tackle Distractions

Once you’ve assessed how you’re currently spending your time, I hope you won’t be in for too big of a shock when you see just how big of an impact distractions and time wasters are in your life.

Every time your mind wanders from your work, it takes an average of 25 minutes and 26 seconds to get into focus again. That’s almost half an hour of precious time every time you entertain a distraction!

Which is why it’s important to learn how to focus, and tackle distractions effectively. Here’s how to do it:

1. Set Time Aside for Focusing

One way to stay focused is to set focused sessions for yourself. During a focused session, you should let people know that you won’t be responding unless it’s a real emergency.

Set your messaging apps and shared calendars as “busy” to reduce interruptions. Think of these sessions as one on one time with yourself so that you can truly focus on what’s important, without external distractions coming your way.

2. Beware of Emails

Emails may sound harmless, but they can come into our inbox continuously throughout the day, and it’s tempting to respond to them as we receive them. Especially if you’re one to check your notifications frequently.

Instead of checking them every time a new notification sounds, set a specific time to deal with your emails at one go. This will no doubt increase your productivity as you’re dealing with emails one after the other, rather than interrupting your focus on another project each time an email comes in.

Besides switching off your email notifications so as not to get distracted, you could also install a Chrome extension called Block Site that helps to stop Gmail notifications coming through at specific times, making it easier for you to manage these subtle daily distractions.

3. Let Technology Help

As much as we are getting increasingly distracted because of technology, we can’t deny it’s many advantages. So instead of feeling controlled by technology, why not make use of disabling options that the devices offer?

Turn off email alerts, app notifications, or set your phone to go straight to voicemail and even create auto-responses to incoming text messages. There are also apps like Forrest that help to increase your productivity by rewarding you each time you focus well, which encourages you to ignore your phone.

4. Schedule Time to Get Distracted

Just as important as scheduling focus time, is scheduling break times. Balance is always key, so when you start scheduling focused sessions, you should also intentionally pen down some break time slots for your mind to relax.

This is because the brain isn’t created to sustain long periods of focus and concentration. The average attention span for an adult is between 15 and 40 minutes. After this time, your likelihood of distractions get stronger and you’ll become less motivated.

So while taking a mental break might seem unproductive, in the long run it makes your brain work more efficiently, and you’ll end up getting more work done overall.

Time is in Your Hands

At the end of the day, we all have a certain amount of time to go all out to pursue our heart’s desires. Whatever your goals are, the time you have now, is in your hands to make them come true.

You simply need to start somewhere, instead of allowing inaction waste your time away, leaving you with regret later on. With a main goal or purpose in mind, you can be on the right track to attaining your desired outcomes.

Being aware of how you spend your time and learning how to tackle common distractions can help boost you forward in completing what’s necessary to reach your most desired goals.

So what are you waiting for? 

Featured photo credit: Aron Visuals via unsplash.com

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