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7 Differences Between Early Birds And Night Owls

7 Differences Between Early Birds And Night Owls

Being an owl or a lark is just a matter of preference. Or is it? Some – and by “some” I obviously mean scientists – say that it can be imbedded into our genes. So if your mama or papa were late nighters, chances are you will be too. In fact, it may run in the entire family. Geneticists are now looking even more into depth to figure out which particular “gene(s)” determine our day-loving/night-loving fates. Here’s an in-depth study on the subject by a team of geneticists from the University of Leicester.

For now, let’s focus on how the choice impacts our productivity. Late nighters you are in for a surprise! Some of you CAN actually dominate and be even more of a genius than the average morning person.

According to Satoshi Kanazawa and his study, “More intelligent children are more likely to grow up to be nocturnal adults who go to bed late and wake up late on both weekdays and weekends.”

This is contrary to popular opinion which holds that early “morning birds always get the worm”. Even owls catch the rodents and insects they are looking for with their amazing sensory capabilities – and they do it darn well without sunlight.

Still, many would argue that early risers are better prepped up for success because “they are more proactive” and ready to make things happen.

Regardless, it can’t be denied that both early risers and night owls have their own strengths and weaknesses. It doesn’t make one better than the other—only slightly different. Let’s observe these differences – some of which are actually very surprising!

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1. Early Birds are Persistent Perfectionists; Night Owls are Go-Getters

According to a study conducted by the University of Barcelona, Spain, morning people tend to be more persistent and less likely to experience “fatigue, frustration, and difficulties”. Night owls, on the other hand, are more likely to indulge in “extravagance, impulsiveness, and novelty-seeking”.  While the larks hunt for stability in their lifestyle, night owls seek game during late hours.

2. Early Birds Wake Up With Smiles; Night Owls with Frowns

Night owls are more likely to hit the snooze button a number of times before they get up in the morning. And when they do, they don’t enjoy it at all. Morning persons, on the other hand, welcome the morning sun with a big smile on their face. Like a lark, they chirp away their mornings humming in an oh-so-delightful mood—and they don’t even need coffee for it. Night owls tend to experience the feelings of euphoria during evening after 6 pm.

3. Early Birds Are Proactive; Night Owls are Smarter

Success doesn’t have to be linked to “intelligence” at all. Apart from Satoshi Kanazawa’s study, Psychologist Richard D. Roberts and Patrick C. Kyllonen measured 420 participants and gave them intelligence tests that involved mathematics, reading comprehension, working memory, and processing speed. The results were in favor of the evening types who were reported to have better scores. This, obviously, doesn’t make them more likely to obtain success. Evidently, early birds are probably doing most of the work during the hours that fit the world of commerce, allowing success to be in their favor.

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4. Early Birds like Tea; Night Owls like Alcohol

The lark is more likely to consume more tea than the night owl. But what about coffee? Here’s the interesting part. According to another study with 537 participants, night owls are more likely to consume caffeine from coffee and cola and they are also more likely to consume alcohol and nicotine. The latter is apparently related to the fact that owls are more likely to indulge in night life where intoxication is prevalent.

5. Early Birds are Creative during Night Hours; Night Owls are Creative in Morning Hours

No, there is no typing error here! Reportedly, night owls and morning birds have their bursts of creativity during their “off hours”. In a study conducted by Mareike Wieth and Rose Zacks in 2011, participants that included both night owls and early birds were given analytical and insight problems to solve. While analytical problems were successfully solved during optimal timings, insightful problems that required creative thinking were better solved during non-optimal hours – meaning during their less preferred hours. What do you know? Apparently those bursts of creativity are common occurrences during periods of mental fatigue.

6. Early Birds are Older; Night Owls are Younger

This obviously doesn’t meant that the clocks of time are cheated and being a night owl makes you younger—although we wish it were that simple. This simply means that your optimal hours might depend on your age. Older people are more likely to be early birds while younger people tend to enjoy late night bed times. Scientists found that this could be due to circadian clocks of skin cells and circadian genes. According to researcher Steven A. Brown, of the Institute for Pharmacology and Toxicology, “he can tell whether you are a ‘lark’ or an ‘owl’ simply by looking at your skin cells”. Not surprisingly, elder people tend to have earlier peak expression in the body cells causing them to go to bed early and wake up early.

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7. Early Birds Love Breakfast; Night Owls Love Dinner

Our most preferred hours not only affect moods, choice of stimulants, and how we tend to work, but also our favorite meal choice. While early birds tend to wake up in the morning and eat a healthy breakfast while reading the newspaper simultaneously or doing something else productive, night owls tend to skip breakfast all together and use their last few minutes before work to get dressed and rush to the office. For night owls, dinner and day-time meals are the best and they make sure they are full of it.

Dr Simon Archer, a researcher from the University of Surrey did a test on himself and found that he had the “physiology of an owl” so he can’t eat breakfast first thing in the morning. Another study revealed that owls are more likely to eat fewer but larger meals during late hours. Thus, these individuals were more prone to obesity, elevated stress levels, and even sleep apnea.

Featured photo credit: d26b73 via flickr.com

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Last Updated on September 11, 2019

Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That)

Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That)

How often do you feel overwhelmed and disorganized in life, whether at work or home? We all seem to struggle with time management in some area of our life; one of the most common phrases besides “I love you” is “I don’t have time”. Everyone suggests working from a to-do list to start getting your life more organized, but why do these lists also have a negative connotation to them?

Let’s say you have a strong desire to turn this situation around with all your good intentions—you may then take out a piece of paper and pen to start tackling this intangible mess with a to-do list. What usually happens, is that you either get so overwhelmed seeing everything on your list, which leaves you feeling worse than you did before, or you make the list but are completely stuck on how to execute it effectively.

To-do lists can work for you, but if you are not using them effectively, they can actually leave you feeling more disillusioned and stressed than you did before. Think of a filing system: the concept is good, but if you merely file papers away with no structure or system, the filing system will have an adverse effect. It’s the same with to-do lists—you can put one together, but if you don’t do it right, it is a fruitless exercise.

Why Some People Find That General To-Do Lists Don’t Work?

Most people find that general to-do lists don’t work because:

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  • They get so overwhelmed just by looking at all the things they need to do.
  • They don’t know how to prioritize the items on list.
  • They feel that they are continuously adding to their list but not reducing it.
  • There’s a sense of confusion seeing home tasks mixed with work tasks.

Benefits of Using a To-Do List

However, there are many advantages working from a to-do list:

  • You have clarity on what you need to get done.
  • You will feel less stressed because all your ‘to do’s are on paper and out of your mind.
  • It helps you to prioritize your actions.
  • You don’t overlook so many tasks and forget anything.
  • You feel more organized.
  • It helps you with planning.

4 Golden Rules to Make a To-Do List Work

Here are my golden rules for making a “to-do” list work:

1. Categorize

Studies have shown that your brain gets overwhelmed when it sees a list of 7 or 8 options; it wants to shut down.[1] For this reason, you need to work from different lists. Separate them into different categories and don’t have more than 7 or 8 tasks on each one.

It might work well for you to have a “project” list, a “follow-up” list, and a “don’t forget” list; you will know what will work best for you, as these titles will be different for everybody.

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2. Add Estimations

You don’t merely need to know what has to be done, but how long it will take as well in order to plan effectively.

Imagine on your list you have one task that will take 30 minutes, another that could take 1 hour, and another that could take 4 hours. You need to know the moment you look at the task, otherwise you undermine your planning, so add an extra column to your list and include your estimation of how long you think the task will take, and be realistic!

Tip: If you find it a challenge to estimate accurately, then start by building this skill on a daily basis. Estimate how long it will take to get ready, cook dinner, go for a walk, etc., and then compare this to the actual time it took you. You will start to get more accurate in your estimations.

3. Prioritize

To effectively select what you should work on, you need to take into consideration: priority, sequence and estimated time. Add another column to your list for priority. Divide your tasks into four categories:

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  • Important and urgent
  • Not urgent but important
  • Not important but urgent
  • Not important or urgent

You want to work on tasks that are urgent and important of course, but also, select some tasks that are important and not urgent. Why? Because these tasks are normally related to long-term goals, and when you only work on tasks that are urgent and important, you’ll feel like your day is spent putting out fires. You’ll end up neglecting other important areas which most often end up having negative consequences.

Most of your time should be spent on the first two categories.

4.  Review

To make this list work effectively for you, it needs to become a daily tool that you use to manage your time and you review it regularly. There is no point in only having the list to record everything that you need to do, but you don’t utilize it as part of your bigger time management plan.

For example: At the end of every week, review the list and use it to plan the week ahead. Select what you want to work on taking into consideration priority, time and sequence and then schedule these items into your calendar. Golden rule in planning: don’t schedule more than 75% of your time.

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Bottom Line

So grab a pen and paper and give yourself the gift of a calm and clear mind by unloading everything in there and onto a list as now, you have all the tools you need for it to work. Knowledge is useless unless it is applied—how badly do you want more time?

To your success!

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Featured photo credit: Emma Matthews via unsplash.com

Reference

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