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5 Ways To Find Out If Your Idea Is Worth Pursuing

5 Ways To Find Out If Your Idea Is Worth Pursuing

So you’ve got a creative idea that you think might be worth pursuing, but you’re just not sure. As with any new creative pursuit knowing whether your idea has legs can be difficult. To help you make the decision, I’m going to share with you five ways to find out if your idea is worth pursuing.

1. Create a Minimum Viable Product

The very best way to find out if your idea is worth pursuing is to create a minimum viable product. A minimum viable product has only the most basic core features of your idea and nothing more i.e. no bells and whistles! Creating a minimum viable product allows you to get your idea out there in front of people to get valuable feedback without putting exorbitant amounts of time and money into its creation. After all, your idea may not float in which case its back to the drawing board. Virgin Airlines started with a single 747 in 1984 on one route. From this minimal service they were able to determine whether the idea was worth pursuing. Today Virgin Airlines is a booming business, but like many others they started out small.

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2. Test it Out

Once you’ve got a minimum viable product out there it’s time to test it out! Get real people using it and use it yourself. Does it work? Can it be improved? How? Testing your idea and answering these big questions will help you decide if your idea is worth pursuing. Twitter started out as a small service among just a handful of friends. In these early days they were able to test the service and improve on it based on results. Today Twitter is a booming online service with millions of active users sharing daily.

3. Seek Feedback Regularly

Seeking feedback is not something that happens just once in a testing phase. Seeking feedback regularly while bringing your idea to life will help you find out if it’s worth pursuing every step along the way and importantly if you’re on the right track as you progress. The best feedback is from those people who most closely fit your target market i.e. the intended end users of your product or service. You can also seek initial feedback from friends and family. Although these people are potentially not in your target market they will likely have some good feedback nonetheless. Gather as much feedback as you can as often as you can to give your idea the best chance of success.

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4. Assess the Level of Passion in Responses

To find out if your idea is worth pursuing you’ll need to assess how passionate the response is toward your idea. Rate responses on a scale of 1-10 and keep track of the scores over time. It can be as simple as keeping score in a computer spreadsheet and regularly checking in to see how you’re tracking over time. Passion is a great predictor of success so start assessing it early on to get a good idea of whether your idea is worth pursuing and how the level of passion among users is changing over time.

5. Be Excited in the Early Stages

You’ll never know if your idea is worth pursuing if you don’t put everything you have into it in the early stages. Don’t be shy of sharing your idea with others around you and pursuing it fully. Get out there are really put your idea out there for the world to see! Be excited and throw yourself into the process by putting your heart and soul into it and you’ll be rewarded with progress and being one step closer to having a stellar idea that others want to be part of. Being excited, passionate and committed in the early stages will give your idea the best chance of success and help you find out if it’s worth pursuing further.

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You might also like: How to Consistently Come Up With Great Ideas

Featured photo credit trophygeek via Flickr CC.

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Featured photo credit: trophygeek via Flickr CC via flickr.com

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Last Updated on November 12, 2020

15 Reasons Why You Can’t Achieve Your Goals

15 Reasons Why You Can’t Achieve Your Goals

The truth about many of our failed goals is that we haven’t achieved them because we didn’t know how to set and accomplish goals effectively, rather than having not had enough willpower, determination, or fortitude. There are strings of mistakes standing in our way of accomplished goals. Fortunately for us, we don’t have to fall victim to these mistakes for 2015. There are many common mistakes we make with setting goals, but there are also surefire ways to fix them too.

Goal Setting

1. You make your goals too vague.

Instead of having a vague goal of “going to the gym,” make your goals specific—something like, “run a mile around the indoor track each morning.”

2. You have no way of knowing where you are with your goals.

It’s hard to recognize where you are at reaching your goal if you have no way of measuring where you are with it. Instead, make your goal measurable with questions such as, “how much?” or “how many?” This way, you always know where you stand with your goals.

3. You make your goals impossible to reach.

If it’s impossible of reaching, you’re simply not going to reach for it. Sometimes, our past behavior can predict our future behavior, which means if you have no sign of changing a behavior within a week, don’t set a goal that wants to accomplish that. While you can do many things you set your mind to, it’ll be much easier if you realize your capabilities, and judge your goals from there.

4. You only list your long-term goals.

Long-term goals tend to fizzle out because we’re stuck on the larger view rather than what we need to accomplish in the here and now to get there. Instead, list out all the short-term goals involved with your long-term goal. For instance, if you want to seek a publisher for a book you’ve written, your short-term goals might involve your marketing your writing and writing for more magazines in order to accomplished your goal of publishing. By listing out the short-term goals involved with your long-term goal, you’ll focus more on doing what’s in front of you.

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5. You write your goals as negative statements.

It’s hard to reach a goal that’s worded as, “don’t fall into this stupid trap.” That’s not inspiring, and when you’re first starting out, you need inspiration to stay committed to your goal. Instead, make your goals positive statements, such as, “Be a friend who says yes more” rather than, “Stop being an idiot to your friends.”

6. You leave your goals in your head.

Don’t keep your goals stuck in your head. Write them down somewhere and keep them visible. It’s a way making your goals real and holding yourself accountable for achieving them.

Achieving Goals

7. You only focus on achieving one goal at a time, and you struggle each time.

In order to keep achieving your goals, one right after the others, you need to build the healthy habits to do so. For instance, if you want to write a book, developing a habit of writing each morning. If you want to lose weight and eventually run a marathon, develop a habit of running each morning. Focus on buildign habits, and your other goals in the future will come easier.

Studies show that it takes about 66 days on average to change or develop a habit.[1] If you focus on forming one habit every 66 days, that’ll get you closer to accomplishing your goals, and you’ll also build the capability to achieve more and more goals later on with the help of your newly formed habits.

8. You live in an environment that doesn’t support your goals.

Gary Keller and Jay Papasan in their book, The One Thing, state that environments are made up of people and places. They state that these two factors must line up to support your goals. Otherwise, they would cause friction to your goals. So make sure the people who surround you and your location both add something to your goals rather than take away from them.

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9. You get stuck on the end result with your goals.

James Clear brilliantly suggests that our focus should be on the systems we implement to reach our goals rather than the actual end result. For instance, if you’re trying to be healthier with your diet, focus more on sticking to your diet plan rather than on your desired end result. It’ll keep you more concentrated on what’s right in front of you rather than what’s up in the sky.

Keeping Motivated

10. You get discouraged with your mess-ups.

When I wake up each morning, I focus all my effort in building a small-win for myself. Why? Because we need confidence and momentum if we want to keep plowing through the obstacles of accomplishing our goals. Starting my day with small wins helps me forget what mess-ups I had yesterday, and be able to reset.

Your win can be as small as getting out of bed to writing a paragraph in your book. Whatever the case may be, highlight the victories when they come along, and don’t pay much attention to whatever mess-ups happened yesterday.

11. You downplay your wins.

When a win comes along, don’t downplay it or be too humble about it. Instead, make it a big deal. Celebrate each time you get closer to your goal with either a party or quality time doing what you love.

12. You get discouraged by all the work you have to do for your goals.

What happens when you focus on everything that’s in front of you is that you can lose sight of the big picture—what you’re actually doing this for and why you want to achieve it. By learning how to filter the big picture through your every day small goals, you’ll be able to keep your motivation for the long haul. Never let go of the big picture.

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13. You waste your downtime.

When I take a break, I usually fill my downtime with activities that further me toward my goals. For instance, I listen to podcasts about writing or entrepreneurship during my lunch times. This keeps my mind focused on the goal, and also utilizes my downtime with motivation to keep trying for my goals.

Wondering what you can do during your downtime? Here’re 20 Productive Ways to Use the Time.

14. You have no system of accountability.

If you announce your goal publicly, or promise to offer something to people, those people suddenly depend on your accomplishment. They are suddenly concerned for your goals, and help make sure you achieve them. Don’t see this as a burden. Instead, use it to fuel your hard work. Have people depend on you and you’ll be motivated to not let them down.

15. You fall victim to all your negative behaviors you’re trying to avoid with your goals.

Instead of making a “to-do” list, make a list of all the behaviors, patterns, and thinking you need to avoid if you ever want to reach your goal. For instance, you might want to chart down, “avoid Netflix” or “don’t think negatively about my capability.” By doing this, you’ll have a visible reminder of all the behavior you need to avoid in order to accomplish your goals. But make sure you balance this list out with your goals listed as positive statements.

How To Stop Failing Your Goal?

If you want to stop failing your goal and finally reach it, don’t miss these actionable tips explained by Jade in this episode of The Lifehack Show:

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Bottom Line

Overcoming our mistakes is the first step to building healthy systems for our goals. If you find one of these cogs jamming the gears to your goal-setting system, I hope you follow these solutions to keep your system healthy and able to churn out more goals.

Make this year where you finally achieve what you’ve only dreamed of.

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Featured photo credit: NORTHFOLK via unsplash.com

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