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20 Technology Tools Educators Should Use

20 Technology Tools Educators Should Use

Old-school educators may feel intimidated by the new trends involved in the classroom, but that should only challenge them to make their classes more interesting for the students. There are various online solutions that can really promote the process of education by enabling teachers to organize the classroom activities and inspire students to get more involved. This article will list 20 new apps that promise great potential in terms of education enhancement.

1. Writinghouse.org

whitehouse.com

    Are you looking for an easy way to create your textbooks according to the widely-accepted referencing styles? Citation generator Writinghouse will automatically take care of the citations and bibliographies and format them according to the referencing style you choose (APA, Chicago or MLA).

    2. HowStuffWorks

    how stuff works

      This website is a valuable source of information you can use in the classroom. It explains thousands of topics in an understandable way that your students will find interesting.

      3. HippoCampus

      Hippo Games

        This interesting online project provides multimedia content that can be used for enhancing the quality of general education subjects.

        4. Fun Brain

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        Fun Brain

          It is time to acknowledge the fact that your students are influenced by technology, so you should accept that trend and turn it to your advantage. This website provides games with real educational value for young students.

          5. First In Math

          First In Math

            This online tool can be used to make math skills interesting for young students. It features online games that encourage kids to learn math because they get rewards and stickers from their teachers as they progress.

            6. DoSomething.org

            DoSomething.org

              Every teacher should encourage their students to take part in social campaigns and make an effort to bring positive changes into the society. This website is the perfect source of inspiration that takes students towards real action.

              7. Exploratorium

              Exploratorium

                Did you think that nothing could ever make science fun for your students? Implement this website into the classroom activities and watch how the impossible turns into reality.

                8. Cool Math

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                Cool Math

                  This website features various games that are safe to be used in the classroom and make school subjects interesting for your students. Besides math games, the website is also a source of geography, science, and reading games.

                  9. Edmondo

                  Edmondo

                    This online collaboration hub can inspire your students to use their full learning potential. It makes social media useful by providing customized classrooms that can enhance the learning and teaching experience.

                    10. Collaborize Classroom

                    Collaborize Classroom

                      This is a free collaborative platform that complements your classroom instructions with additional assignments, activities and discussions your students can access after class.

                      11. Weebly

                      Collaborize Classroom

                        This website enables teachers to develop a site or blog for their classroom, which can be used for easy communication with both students and their parents.

                        12. Spelling City

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                        Spelling City

                          This online tool offers games that make the learning experience very easy for young children. They can play writing, vocabulary, and spelling games that will make their education more interesting.

                          13. Starfall

                          Starfall

                            This website can help you teach young children to read through fun online games and interesting interactive storybooks.

                            14. Scratch

                            Scratch

                              Scratch is another website intended to be used by the younger population. However, it teaches them something different than reading and vocabulary–children are invited to create their own stories, animations, and games via this online tool.

                              15. Raz Kids

                              Raz Kids

                                This online source provides an entire curriculum of reading lessons in the form of cute online books. Students from a wide range of ages can use this website to improve their reading skills, and the teacher corner enables the educators to monitor their students’ progress.

                                16. Schoology

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                                Schoology

                                  This is a unique social network and learning management system that can be used by both teachers and students for the development of academic content. The website also allows users to share the content they create.

                                  17. Scholastic Kids Press Corps

                                  Scholastic Kids Press Corps

                                    Your students should be interested in reading news that is appropriate for their age, and this website is the best way to inspire this habit. Teachers are encouraged to incorporate the news they find on this website into their classes.

                                    18. MyBackPack

                                    MyBackPack

                                      Teachers have always been trying to find the most effective way of communication with their students’ parents. This website provides a solution to their problems, by allowing them to share real-time updates on the schedule, grades, and class attendance.

                                      19. iCivics

                                      iCivics

                                        This website will inspire ideas about making positive changes in the community, so educators should definitely present it to their students.

                                        20. Melody Street

                                        Melody Street

                                          Music is already interesting for young students, but learning about notes and different instruments isn’t an easy process. This website makes everything easy because the instruments come to life and teach music lessons in a fun way.

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                                          Last Updated on June 18, 2019

                                          The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder That Works)

                                          The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder That Works)

                                          No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

                                          Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

                                          Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

                                          A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

                                          Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

                                          In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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                                          From Making Reminders to Building Habits

                                          A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

                                          For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

                                          This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

                                          The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

                                          That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

                                          Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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                                          The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

                                          Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

                                          But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

                                          The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

                                          The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

                                          A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

                                          For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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                                          But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

                                          If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

                                          For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

                                          These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

                                          For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

                                          How to Make a Reminder Works for You

                                          Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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                                          Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

                                          Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

                                          My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

                                          Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

                                          I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

                                          More About Habits

                                          Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

                                          Reference

                                          [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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