Advertising
Advertising

15 Eating Habits to Make You Stay Productive at Work

15 Eating Habits to Make You Stay Productive at Work

Everyone knows it: staying energetic at work can be a real drag. Only a few hours into your Monday and your eyes are blurry, your back is sore, and you are longing for the weekend once again. While getting a good night’s sleep and maintaining a healthy exercise routine both play important parts in daytime productivity, eating habits are crucial as well. By simply avoiding foods that will slow you down, and building eating habits that move you forward, everyone can stay more productive at work. While this may seem like a daunting task, some of the most effective ways to boost your productivity at work are actually incredibly simple changes to make.

Don’t eat junk food

Whether you have a sweet tooth or just have a lot of free snacks around the office, eating junk food is a quick way to lose your alertness at work. Foods that are high in trans and saturated fats will make you feel sluggish, while foods high in sugar will give you a quick energy high, followed by a crash. Despite the fact that sugary and fatty snacks tend to be easy to transport and consume on the go, you are better off eating nutritious foods if you want to stay sharp at work.

Be careful with caffeine

When you start to feel your productivity at work slide, it’s all too easy to reach for a triple espresso, or a handful of chocolate covered coffee beans. Even though it seems counterintuitive, consuming sizable amounts of caffeine can actually make your productivity at work suffer. Much like unhealthy snacks, consuming too much caffeine at once will give you a quick spike in energy, but guarantees a productivity-harming crash. To stay productive all day, it’s better to consume small amounts of caffeine, like the amount in a cup of green tea.

Advertising

Eat breakfast every morning

Another foolproof way to keep your energy up at work is to make sure you eat breakfast. Even if you are not someone who is generally hungry in the morning, eating breakfast ensures your body moves out of its sleep-friendly energy-conserving state and into its wakeful daytime state. Even a glass of juice, protein shake, or piece of fruit in the morning is better for your productivity than nothing.

Eat the right foods for breakfast

Now that you are comfortable eating breakfast, make sure you eat the right snacks in the morning. Much like gaining steady energy by eating complex carbohydrates, foods known as low glycemic foods are digested slowly by your body. To fuel up effectively for the rest of your day, eat low glycemic foods for breakfast. In doing so, your body gains a steady source of energy to get you through until lunch.

Eat small, frequent meals

Similarly, eating small, frequent meals is a good way to keep your blood glucose levels constant, which helps you have energy. If you eat infrequently, your body’s blood sugar levels dip excessively low in between meals. When you finally eat, you are more likely to overeat, causing your blood sugar levels to go higher than normal. This yo-yo cycle in your blood sugar makes your energy levels unpredictable. Having low energy at inopportune times will cause a serious dip in your productivity. By eating smaller and more frequent meals, you space out your body’s fuel supply more evenly. By spacing out your meals equally, your energy levels fluctuate less dramatically, so your body stays energized.

Advertising

Keep lunch moderate

On a related note, staying productive at work is easier when you eat smaller portion sizes. For example, though many people believe that turkey is to blame for feeling sleepy on Thanksgiving, many scientists agree that it is actually overindulging in our portion sizes that causes the dip. This means that eating a giant lunch, especially while you’re at work, will have a similar effect. If you want to stay productive at work all day, make sure the amount you eat at lunch is moderate.

Don’t eat tryptophan on an empty stomach

Tryptophan is the ingredient in turkey and other poultry responsible for that pesky rumor that Thanksgiving foods, and not their portion sizes, is what causes drowsiness on the holiday. In reality, tryptophan only causes sleepiness when ingested on an empty stomach. For this reason, foods high in tryptophan should be avoided when you haven’t had anything to eat in a while. Foods high in tryptophan include turkey and other poultry, milk and cheese, as well as some fish.

Do eat fruit on an empty stomach

Fruit is uniquely situated to give you long-lasting productivity during your day at work. Fruit contains fiber and complex sugars, which breakdown slower then simple sugars (like those found in candy and junk food). Fruit is also easily digested by the body, which lets you skip the fatigue associated with hard to digest snacks or large portion sizes. When you haven’t had anything to eat in a while, it’s best to reach for a bit of fruit instead of dairy or poultry so your body gets off to the right start.

Advertising

Eat whole grains

When you eat carbohydrates that your stomach breaks down quickly, your blood sugar levels will spike, which is always followed by a bottoming out of your energy levels. Multigrain and whole grain carbohydrates take longer for your body to digest, which means the energy you gain from them is spread out over a particularly lengthy amount of time. This steady gain in energy will help you stay productive at work for greater periods of time.

Skip the steak

While you don’t have to cut meat out of your diet entirely, eating less meat for breakfast and lunch can help you be more productive at work. Meat is usually high fat, and is always high-protein, which makes it more strenuous to digest than other foods. It’s perfectly healthy to love meat, but indulging in large portions of meat before and during work could hamper your productivity.

Eat extra omega 3s

Omega 3s are an essential fatty acid found in many nuts, oils, and fatty fishes. These critical ingredients help keep your brain cells thriving, as well as help your body store carbohydrates as energy, rather than fat. Making a special effort to ensure you have enough omega 3s in your diet can help you stay alert at work.

Advertising

Hydrate

Not only does drinking enough water help your body to stay healthy, keeping hydrated aids the transport of energy-providing nutrients throughout the body. Not only that, as you grow dehydrated your blood thickens, which forces your heart to pump with difficulty, which makes you feel drained more quickly.

Eat enough fiber

Much like complex carbohydrates, eating enough fiber helps your body to digest food slowly and steadily. This means your energy levels stay uniform, letting you be more productive, more alert, and better prepared for your day.

Avoid drinking to help you sleep

While having a glass of wine before bed might help you nod off initially, alcohol may actually make your sleep less restful. Alcohol affects the way your body metabolizes food, plus it depresses your body’s energy levels. Although this makes it easier to fall asleep, when the alcohol wears off in the middle of the night you might be more prone to waking up. Staying productive at work is tied to getting enough rest, so avoiding alcohol before bed the day prior to work will help you get more efficient sleep.

Fight the afternoon blahs intelligently

Much like eating quick and healthy meals, fighting your afternoon slump without caffeine will help you be more productive at work. As mentioned, too much caffeine will cause your energy levels to crash, severely affecting your productivity. However, another way caffeine makes you less productive is by messing with your sleep. Consuming too much caffeine in the afternoon can negatively impact your sleep later that night, which will give you an even less productive tomorrow. Instead of reaching for caffeine-heavy beverages when you grow groggy in the afternoon, which are often heavy in sugar as well, try one of the other energy boosting methods on this list. A quick snack that is high in omega-3s or fiber, or simply drinking a glass of water, can be a better way to boost your energy and skip the crash.

Featured photo credit: Wall_Food_10051/Michael Stern via flickr.com

More by this author

When You Start to Enjoy Being Single, These 12 Things Will Happen 10 Things You Should Do If You’re Unemployed common words 18 Common Words That You Should Replace in Your Writing Wondering Why K Pop is So Popular? Here are 10 Reasons The 10 Most (And Least) Expensive States In America

Trending in Productivity

1 7 Natural Memory Boosters That Actually Work for All Ages 2 How to Improve Your Memory: 7 Natural (And Highly Effective) Ways 3 11 Tactics on Increasing Brain Power, Memory, and Motivation 4 How to Use More of Your Brain to Become More Productive and Happy 5 Master These 10 Management Skills to Become a Strong Leader

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on February 21, 2019

7 Natural Memory Boosters That Actually Work for All Ages

7 Natural Memory Boosters That Actually Work for All Ages

Forgot a name? Misplaced your keys? Taking longer to find the right words? Don’t panic. There’s plenty you can do to improve your memory.

You’re probably expecting us to reveal 7 little known and newly discovered herbs from the forests of the Amazon, the peaks of the Himalayas and the Arctic tundra. No such luck.

Despite Americans spending hundreds of millions of dollars a year on Ginkgo Biloba, Ashwagandha, Periwinkle, Bacopa, Vitamin B’s, Omega 3’s and memory boosting supplement cocktails, there is very little scientific evidence they actually work. [1]

Instead, we’re going to offer you 7 completely natural memory boosters, backed up by scientific research. It may take a little more effort than a magic memory pill, but the benefits will transcend your memory and improve your overall quality of life as well, making you more fit, energetic, happy and sharp.

How Do We Remember?

The first process in remembering is creating a memory.

This is where our brain sends a signal, associated with a thought, event or piece of information our mind is processing, over our brains neural pathways, called synapses.

Think of our neural pathways like roads and information like trucks. The better the roads, the more trucks can be driven.

The second step in remembering is memory consolidation.

Consolidation is when the brain takes that thought, event or piece of information and actually stores it in the brain. So now we’re talking about taking delivery of the trucks and storing its contents in the warehouse.

Consolidation helps us store information and label it properly, so its organized and easy to retrieve when needed.

Advertising

The last step is memory retrieval.

That’s the step whereby we try to retrieve the information stored in our brains. You know when you have the name of someone on the tip of your tongue.

You have the information; it’s been stored, but you just can’t find it. Our memory recall is typically better the stronger the memory is and the more often we’ve used it.

Memory decline is a normal part of aging. However, new scientific research is discovering many new ways for us to improve memory creation, consolidation and retrieval–no matter our age.

7 Natural Memory Boosters

So how to work on memory and boost your brain power? Here’re 7 brain boosters backed by science that you should try:

1. Aerobic Exercise

Aerobic activity is about as close as we get to a magic pill for our memories. Exercise helps your brain create new capillaries and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) which creates new brain cells and connections. To put it in plain english, aerobic activity changes our brains and helps it grow.

Studies have shown that exercising increases the size of the hippocampus and improves memory. In fact, even if you start exercising as an older adult, you can reverse cognitive decline by 1 to 2 years and protects against further decreases in the size of the hippocampus, which is essential for memory. [2]

In another study, reviewed by Dr. Ian Robertson of the University of Dublin, they looked at a group of people of 60 years and older, who engaged in “active walking” for four months.

They compared them with another group of people who only stretched over the same period of time. After testing both groups before and after the 4 month period, the walkers improved their memory and attention considerably more than the stretching group.

So which exercises are best and how much do we have to exercise?

Advertising

Turns out, it doesn’t really matter whether you run, swim, row or bike. What does matter is that you push yourself beyond your current abilities, keep doing more, keep getting better. Set yourself short term goals and keep pushing the goal posts.

2. Sleep

You need your sleep. The deeper the better. Sleep helps improve your procedural memory (how to do things, like how do I navigate my iPhone) and declarative memory (facts, like what’s my password). [3]

Even short naps from 6 to 45 minutes have been shown to improve your memory. In one Harvard study, college students memorized pairs of unrelated words, memorized a maze and copied a complex form. All were tested on their work. Half were then allowed to take a 45 minute nap. They were then retested. Those who took a nap, got a boost in their performance. [4]

Another study showed that getting REM (deep) sleep can increase your memory and mental performance by 33% to 73%. Getting a deep sleep helps the brain consolidate memories through dreams and “associative processing”. However, the study also revealed that heart rate variability in deep sleep also contributed significantly to increased memory performance. [5]

3. MIND Diet

Healthy eating, particularly more dark colored fruit, vegetables and oily fish has been shown to improve memory and stave off cognitive decline.

The MIND diet is proven to reduce the risk of dementia. It’s a mix of the popular Mediterranean diet and the low blood pressure DASH diet. [6]

The study kept track of the diets of almost 1,000 older adults. They were followed for an average of 4½ years.

The study concluded that “people whose diets were most strongly in line with the MIND diet had brains that functioned as if they were 7½ years younger than those whose diets least resembled this eating style.”

The study also showed that people who followed the MIND diet in the study reduced their chance of getting Alzheimer’s disease in half.

Advertising

So what does the MIND diet consist of? Lots of vegetables, leafy greens, nuts, berries, beans, fish, poultry, olive oil, whole grains and wine.

4. Relax

We all know that stress is bad for our health. It can raise our blood pressure, impact our immune system and interrupt our sleep. Stress also impairs our memory.

When our body gets stressed, it releases cortisol into our blood stream, which can cause short and long term physical changes to the brain. While cortisol has sometimes been shown to cause increases in short term memory, it can actually decrease our long term recall memory.

To help reduce the stress in your life, try relaxing with meditation, yoga or breathing exercises. Unplug–even for just a few hours. Stop checking your emails, social accounts and news. Release some endorphins with some exercise.

Bottom line, the more anxious and stressed we are, the less clearly we think, the poorer our memory works.

5. Continuous Learning

The mind is like a muscle. The more you challenge it, the stronger it gets. The more you learn, the more you can learn.

Research shows that learning can actually change the physical makeup of your brain. Not too long ago, we used to think that you were born with a fixed amount of brain cells, which declined with age. New research now shows that we can actually increase the number of brain cells we have throughout our life.

Aside from staying physically active, learning new skills and studying can actually keep our brains healthier. Consider taking a continuing education class, studying a new language, learning a new instrument, playing new card games. [7]

Studies show that the more complex the task, the more benefits for your mind. Simply showing up to class is not enough. You need to be actively engaged. Anything that forces you to focus and learn something new and get out of a rote routine will help you sharpen your mind and boost your memory.

6. Stay Social

The more deep and meaningful social connections you maintain, the more you protect your brain. Bottom line, the more friends you have, the more people you work with, the more you’re forced to use your brain.

Advertising

Social isolation and loneliness are significant risks of dementia. Without interacting with others, our brains wilt. Isolation and loneliness lead to depression, physical and mental decline. [8]

In a 2016 study published in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, seniors with a full social calendar did better on memory, reasoning, and processing speed tests. [9]

What to do?

Party! Seriously, get together with friends as often as possible. Have family dinners. Choose social activities or sports like tennis, golf, cards or go for walks with a friend. Bottom line have fun, build meaningful social relationships and stay connected. Not only will it make your mind sharper and your memory better, you’ll be happier, too!

7. Wakeful Rest

This one is getting harder and harder to do. In a world where we can’t sit on a bus, go up an elevator or go to the bathroom without our phones, doing absolutely nothing to distract our minds is becoming increasingly difficult.

But, the results are in. Doing nothing is great for your memory. Quietly resting for 10 minutes, after you learn something will help you remember and help you create more detailed memories. [10]

What we do minutes after we learn something new has a significant impact on how well we retain the new information. In another study, it didn’t matter what you did after you learned something new, as long as you weren’t distracted by outside factors. In other words, you could be thinking of your day, making a grocery list, or thinking of a story. In either case, wakeful rest for a period of 10 minutes helped the brain process and consolidate your memories so that you were better able to recall the information at a later date. [11]

Conclusion

You don’t have to spend a dime on cocktails and supplements promising a quick boost to your memory power. There is very little conclusive scientific evidence suggesting supplements will help improve the memories of healthy individuals–not for Ginkgo Biloba, Vitamin B, fish oils, Vitamin D, Folate or other supplements claiming they a secret formula.

There are far cheaper and more effective ways to boost your memory: exercise, rest, eat well, learn, love, laugh and relax. Who wouldn’t want that prescription?

More Resources About Boost Brain Power

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

Reference

Read Next