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15 Creative Tips and Resources to Efficiently Memorize Vocab

15 Creative Tips and Resources to Efficiently Memorize Vocab
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There are many different ways to learning vocabulary, whether it be for a test in science, business or politics, learning the vocab of a new language or even the small details within your speech that you want to memorize. The way that you memorize vocab is very important – it needs to be powerful, smart and efficient in order for you to progress with speed. Luckily, there are some helpful tools and resources out there to help you unlock your potential in memorizing key vocab.

Let’s start:

Creating associations is a very clever tactic to developing memory strength for specific information that you are learning – in this case, vocabulary.

1. Mnemonics

These are very simple ways to remember a large sentence of words. Below is an example. This has helped millions learn the solar system, the north, east, south and west directions, and the colors in the rainbow, among other important things.

tclef_mnemonic
    2. Environment

    This is an opportunity to expand your association to physical objects and real life things. Associating your vocab or information with a physical object has been very useful in helping to learn and relate to the original piece of information. People have been doing it with their hands, equipment and resources around them for years.

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    3. Weird associations

    Another useful method is using weird associations to already existing objects or names of certain things. An example of this is when one of my friends in my class remembered “mandare”, which is “to send” in Italian, by associating it to her other friend’s name Mandy, who would mail her presents at Christmas. These kind of associations won’t let you forget the information of the word and its meanings.

    Tool for Associations:

    4. FlashSticks – For Language Learning

    FlashSticks are foreign language Post-it Notes, each printed with a unique, commonly used word, translation, icon and phonetic.They are designed to help you memorise vocabulary by using association. The main benefit to using FlashSticks is the opportunity to stick them in the areas that help you remember more easily. For example, if someone wanted to learn Spanish and they had a pack of FlashSticks, they would place each note over the object of relevance.

    This helps the brain create association and build on its memory strength. You can also strengthen this by taking out your smartphone and scanning the note, and from here you can get a language coach to show you the correct pronunciation.

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      The next step:

      Creating an environment – This is developing things around you to learn a specific thing.

      5. Different Sources

      You need to explore different sources of taking in new vocabulary that tests what kind of person you are, whether you are more visual, audio or physical.

      6. Learning from friends

      Your friends can be an environment, and they can be of huge use when it comes to engaging with another one on one about something that they know and you are trying to learn. Whether it s a language, computer problem or training, learning the right vocab from another will help you build association and learn more effectively.

      7. Using Technologies

      Using new technology, wearable technology, and podcasts are resources that you need to be taking advantage of.

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      8. StudyBlue

      Revise and memorize anything online. This is targeted towards students and other learners, as StudyBlue is an online flashcards website that allows you to learn online and on the go. This website is amazing for collaborating with others on notes and improving student’s revision. Perfect for memorizing vocab.

      studyblue_large
        9. Duolgingo – Android Wear application

        This is, again, targeted toward language learners, but on the go you need to have something at your fingertips. StudyBlue has an app, but Duolingo has an Android wear application that allows you to learn vocab on languages on the go. This is based off of a card app that allows you to choose whether you’ve gotten something correct or incorrect. You get 10 new words a day to learn and it is available in multiple languages,

        Duolingo-Android-Wear-640

          Reviewing your memory – Using a review system is useful in build up a much stronger ability to memorize vocab. For this process I take my time to discover some new technologies out there to meet the needs of my vocabulary

          10. Evernote & Get Reflect – For reviewing on your notes

          If you are using Evernote for the collection of notes, images and documents throughout your day, then you’ll love this application on the web. Get Reflect is designed to help you recover notes, review notes, and remains perfect for learning vocabulary from notes – just use a tag in your Evernote and you’ll master this vocab revision opportunity.

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            11. Drink lots

            When learning new things, it is important that your brain knows what you are doing and keeps working to its top capacity. Drink lots of water throughout your day for that vocab to be retained.

            12. SoundCloud

            From experience, some of the best ways to memorize vocab is audio and SoundCloud has a massive library of vocabulary-based content, especially in the language area. This is such a great source to check out!

            13. Mono-tasking

            Focus on one task, don’t get distracted. When learning something like vocab, you need all of your attention. Find a quiet place and focus on just one thing.

            14. Chewing gum

            Apparently if you are chewing gum while studying, then gum of the same flavor will help you make the association when reviewing the material later. Very powerful – grab some gum and try it out over time.

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            15. Mind-mapping

            Get a big piece of A3, and hit into spreading your vocab across the page. This will help you discover and learn the words in a more visual way.

            Featured photo credit: Flashsticks via flashsticks.com

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            Last Updated on July 21, 2021

            The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

            The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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            No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

            Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

            Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

            A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

            Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

            In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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            From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

            A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

            For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

            This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

            The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

            That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

            Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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            The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

            Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

            But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

            The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

            The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

            A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

            For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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            But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

            If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

            For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

            These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

            For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

            How to Make a Reminder Works for You

            Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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            Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

            Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

            My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

            Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

            I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

            More on Building Habits

            Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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            Reference

            [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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