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11 Successful People And Their Unique Habits

11 Successful People And Their Unique Habits

Have you ever wondered about the habits of history’s most successful people? What is it they do that helps them earn money, respect and a good reputation? Becoming more successful with the help of simple daily habits is easier than you think when you have focus and are committed to reaching your goals.

Read on to learn about 11 successful people and the unique habits that helped them succeed.

1. Benjamin Franklin

Waking up early in the morning

    Benjamin Franklin is one of the most successful and well-known men in history, being not only known as a politician but also as a printer, inventor, scientist, and much more. One notable habit of his was to rise very early each day before he started work. He would wake up at 5 a.m., bathe, review his business for the day, and have breakfast. This way he would be fully focused by 8 a.m. and would be able to work without getting distracted.

    2. Evan Williams

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    Evan Williams Co-Founder of Twitter

      Evan Williams, founder of Blogger and Twitter, keeps his mind sharp by making sure his body gets a workout. Every day he takes some time off in the middle of the day to go work out at the gym, and when he returns, his energy level is higher and he is able to focus more easily on his work.

      3. Arianna Huffington

      Arianna Huffinton Founder Huffintonpost

        Arianna Huffington, President and Editor-in-Chief of The Huffington Post, practices yoga and meditation each day to help her keep stress levels down and increase mindfulness in her life. When people don’t have as much stress in their life and they are more aware of their own feelings and needs, they are happier and healthier. Happy, healthy people can provide their best work to the companies that employ them or to the companies they own.

        4. Randy Garutti

        of the Shake Shack Randy Garutti

          Randy Garutti, CEO of the Shake Shack franchise, attributes his success to the habit of focusing on one thing at a time and “being present.” No one can do everything at once, so it is better to give your whole focus to one task at a time. Otherwise you’ll spread yourself out over numerous tasks and not be able to give as much time and energy to any of them as you could if you gave yourself more room to focus.

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          5. Barack Obama

          US President Barack Obama

            Among the many successful habits that Obama practices, one of the most significant is making it a point to have breakfast with his daughters and the first lady, help his daughters get ready for school, and have dinner with his family again in the evening. Like Obama, successful people are careful to strike a good work-life balance, working hard but also making sure to prioritize spending time with family.

            6. Stephen King

            Famous Fiction Writer Stephen King Playing Guitar

              The famous fiction writer Stephen King makes a habit of keeping his work space arranged the same way every day. He sits down to work at around the same time every day and in the same chair, has a glass of water, keeps his papers arranged in the same way each day, and listens to the same music. This is his way of getting himself ready to focus on working, and when you are focused on your work, you are bound to succeed.

              7. Franz Kafka

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              Franz Kafka Writer

                Another famous fiction writer, Franz Kafka spent his days as an insurance agent but always made time to feed his creative urge. He would start writing at 10:30 p.m. and keep going into the early hours of the morning. His day job was very stressful and busy, but creative writing was his release. No matter how busy your day job, everyone should nurture their passions when they have time in order to stay motivated. And who knows … perhaps your passion will be your calling.

                8. David Zinczenko

                Men's Health Editor-In-Chief David Zinczenko

                  David Zinczenko, Editor-in-Chief of Men’s Health magazine, practices the habit of keeping healthy snacks and drinks around his office. This way he stays energized and won’t experience a sugar crash later in the day from eating unhealthy foods. Plus, when he already has snacks stocked, he doesn’t have to leave the office while he is working just to waste time buying food.

                  9. Cindy Ratzlaff

                  Cindy Ratzlaff, a consultant, speaker and author

                    Cindy Ratzlaff, a consultant, speaker and author, comes up with a “success goal” each day and writes it on her white board in her office. It’s then in front of her all day to remind her to ask herself before each action if the action will serve her chosen goal. Keeping focused on a goal brings purpose to each choice she makes, eliminating time-wasters and distractions.

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                    10. Albert Einstein

                    Theoretical Physicist Albert Einstein

                      Albert Einstein, theoretical physicist, philosopher and author, enjoyed taking the time to go for long walks on the beach or gazing at the ceiling during the workweek so that he could listen to what was going on in his mind. By spending some time in solitude, you can reach deep within yourself and focus on the thoughts in your head.

                      11. Warren Buffett

                      Warren Buffett CEO Berkshire Hathaway

                        Warren Buffett, the oracle of Omaha, likes to play online bridge with three other partners almost every Monday because of the emphasis it places on “playing a hand right rather than on playing it successfully.” Successful people know that luck comes from working hard over time and positioning themselves for success rather than hoping to just get lucky.

                        These successful individuals have great habits that work to help them stay successful. Develop some unique habits for yourself and soon you will be on your way to success and time well spent.

                        Featured photo credit: Silhouette of successful business man /KieferPix via shutterstock.com

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                        Last Updated on September 23, 2020

                        5 Reasons for Your Facebook Addiction (and How to Break It)

                        5 Reasons for Your Facebook Addiction (and How to Break It)

                        Facebook is embedded into lives around the world. We use it to connect with friends, share important milestones, and check in with the news. However, what may seem like harmless scrolling can become harmful if it takes up inordinate amounts of time and turns into a Facebook addiction.

                        The first step to breaking any bad habit is to understand the symptoms and psychological triggers that made you pick up the habit in the first place. Below you’ll find the common causes, and the good news is that, once you’ve identified them, you can implement specific strategies to get over your Facebook addiction.

                        Symptoms of a Facebook Addiction

                        Do you find that the first thing you do when you wake up is grab your phone and scroll through Facebook? Is it the last thing you see before falling asleep? You may have a Facebook addiction. Here are some more of the signs and symptoms[1]:

                        • You end up spending hours on Facebook, even when you don’t mean to.
                        • You use Facebook to escape problems or change your mood.
                        • You go to sleep later because you’re glued to your screen.
                        • Your relationships are suffering because you spend more time on your phone than you do talking with the people you care about.
                        • You automatically pull out your phone when you have free time.

                        You can check out this TED Talk by Tristan Harris to understand how Facebook and other social media gain and hold our attention:

                        Psychological Reasons for a Facebook Addiction

                        A compulsive Facebook addiction doesn’t come out of nowhere. There are often root causes that push you into Facebook, which can ultimately manifest as an addiction once you become dependent on it. Here are some of the common causes.

                        Procrastination

                        Facebook can cause procrastination, but many times, your tendency to procrastinate can lead you to scrolling through your Facebook feed.

                        Facebook capitalizes on your tendency to procrastinate[2] by incorporating a news feed with an infinite scroll. No matter how far down you go, there will always be more memes and status updates to keep you distracted from whatever you should be doing.

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                        Thus, it might be helpful to change your perception of Facebook. Instead of looking at it like a place to be social or kill time, frame Facebook as the enemy of your productivity and purpose. Doesn’t sound as tempting now, right?

                        Loneliness or Indecision

                        Facebook resembles a boring reality TV show that is on full display during every hour of the day. Do you really need to tell everybody what you ate for lunch? I doubt it.

                        You don’t share such trivial details to add value to people’s lives. You’re likely doing it because you’re lonely and in need of attention or approval[3].

                        Seeking opinions from your friends could be a sign of indecision or low self-confidence. If you get a bad suggestion, then you can conveniently blame somebody else, thus protecting your ego.

                        Social Comparisons

                        Social comparison is a natural part of being human[4]. We need to know where we stand in order to judge our rank among our peers. And Facebook has made this all too easy.

                        When we get into Facebook, our brains are bombarded by hundreds of people to compare ourselves to. We see our cousin’s amazing vacation to Europe, our friend’s adorable baby, our brother’s new puppy, etc. Everything looks better than what we have because, of course, people are only going to post the best parts.

                        This extreme form of social comparison with a Facebook addiction can, unfortunately, lead to depression. One study pointed out that “people feel depressed after spending a great deal of time on Facebook because they feel badly when comparing themselves to others”[5].

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                        People-Pleasing

                        Facebook takes advantage of your desire for instant gratification[6]. Your brain receives a dopamine hit every time you see that red notification light up. Dopamine is a chemical in your brain that causes you to seek pleasure from things.

                        Pleasure sounds nice in theory, but dopamine is responsible for self-destructive behavior if overproduced. Thus, becoming a slave to your notifications can destroy your self-control in a hurry.

                        If that wasn’t bad enough, the human desire to be liked and accepted is at play, too. Every time you get a “Like,” your brain decides that means somebody likes you. Keep this up and you’ll turn into an addict desperate for another “hit.”

                        Fear of Missing out (FOMO)

                        Facebook wrecks your focus by preying on your fear of missing out. You check your Facebook feed during a date because you don’t want to miss any interesting updates. You check your messages while you drive because a friend might have something exciting to share.

                        One study found that “a high level of fear of missing out and high narcissism are predictors of Facebook intrusion, while a low level of fear of missing out and high narcissism are related to satisfaction with life”[7].

                        Therefore, while you may feel temporarily glad that you didn’t miss something, research shows that FOMO will actually reduce your overall life satisfaction.

                        How to Break a Facebook Addiction

                        Now that you know some of the causes of a Facebook addiction, you may be ready to break it. If so, follow these 5 steps to get over your addiction and improve your mental health.

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                        1. Admit the Addiction

                        You can’t fix a problem if you deny it exists. Don’t beat yourself up, but do try and be honest enough to admit you’re a Facebook addict. If it makes you feel any better, I’m a recovering addict myself. There is no reason to be ashamed.

                        Telling a trusted friend might help you stay accountable, especially if they share your goal.

                        2. Be Mindful of Triggers

                        In order to discover the triggers that lead you to use Facebook, ask yourself the following questions. It may be helpful to write them down at a journal.

                        • What did I do? (scrolling, sharing, notification checking, etc.)
                        • When did I do it? (down-time at work, as soon as you woke up, right before bed, on a date, etc.)
                        • What happened right before? (a stressful event, boredom, etc.)
                        • How did this make me feel? (stressed, anxious, sad, angry, etc.)

                        Once you’re aware of what pushes you to use Facebook, you can work on tackling those specific things to get over your Facebook addiction.

                        3. Learn to Recognize the Urge

                        Every time you feel the urge to update your status or check your feed, recognize that impulse for what it is (a habitual behavior—NOT a conscious decision). This is especially powerful when you complete step 2 because you’ll be able to make a mental note of the specific psychological trigger at play.

                        Have a plan for when you feel the desire to use Facebook. For example, if you know you use it when you’re bored, plan to practice a hobby instead. If you use it when you’re stressed, create a relaxation routine instead of jumping on Facebook.

                        4. Practice Self-Compassion

                        Facebook is an epic time-suck, but that doesn’t mean you should criticize yourself every time you log-on to your feed. Beating yourself up will make you feel bad about yourself, which will ironically cause you to be even more tempted.

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                        Self-loathing can only lead to failure. You might end up deciding it’s hopeless because you are “too lazy.”  If you want to break your addiction for good, then you need to be self-compassionate.

                        5. Replace the Addiction With a Positive Alternative

                        It’s a lot easier to eliminate a bad habit when you decide on a good habit that you would like to replace it with. I applied this idea by choosing to pick up a book every time I was tempted to check my feed.

                        The result blew my mind. I read over a hundred pages in the first day! Trust me when I say those “few minutes of down-time” can add up to an obscene amount of waste.

                        Having a specific metric to track is important. If you want to stay encouraged, you need to have compelling evidence that your time would be better spent elsewhere.

                        For example, download an app to help you determine exactly how much time is spent on Facebook so you know how much of your life you’re losing to it. Then, when you find a healthy alternative, you can feel good about all the time you’re giving to it!

                        Final Thoughts

                        Facebook addictions aren’t uncommon in today’s technologically dependent world. In the pursuit of human connection, we’ve mistakenly taken our interactions online, thinking it would be an easier alternative. Unfortunately, this is no replacement for genuine, face-to-face interaction in real life.

                        If you think you have a problem, there are things you can do to tackle it. Get started today and improve your overall well-being.

                        More on How to Use Social Media Less

                        Featured photo credit: Tim Bennett via unsplash.com

                        Reference

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