Advertising
Advertising

11 Successful People And Their Unique Habits

11 Successful People And Their Unique Habits

Have you ever wondered about the habits of history’s most successful people? What is it they do that helps them earn money, respect and a good reputation? Becoming more successful with the help of simple daily habits is easier than you think when you have focus and are committed to reaching your goals.

Read on to learn about 11 successful people and the unique habits that helped them succeed.

1. Benjamin Franklin

Waking up early in the morning

    Benjamin Franklin is one of the most successful and well-known men in history, being not only known as a politician but also as a printer, inventor, scientist, and much more. One notable habit of his was to rise very early each day before he started work. He would wake up at 5 a.m., bathe, review his business for the day, and have breakfast. This way he would be fully focused by 8 a.m. and would be able to work without getting distracted.

    2. Evan Williams

    Advertising

    Evan Williams Co-Founder of Twitter

      Evan Williams, founder of Blogger and Twitter, keeps his mind sharp by making sure his body gets a workout. Every day he takes some time off in the middle of the day to go work out at the gym, and when he returns, his energy level is higher and he is able to focus more easily on his work.

      3. Arianna Huffington

      Arianna Huffinton Founder Huffintonpost

        Arianna Huffington, President and Editor-in-Chief of The Huffington Post, practices yoga and meditation each day to help her keep stress levels down and increase mindfulness in her life. When people don’t have as much stress in their life and they are more aware of their own feelings and needs, they are happier and healthier. Happy, healthy people can provide their best work to the companies that employ them or to the companies they own.

        4. Randy Garutti

        of the Shake Shack Randy Garutti

          Randy Garutti, CEO of the Shake Shack franchise, attributes his success to the habit of focusing on one thing at a time and “being present.” No one can do everything at once, so it is better to give your whole focus to one task at a time. Otherwise you’ll spread yourself out over numerous tasks and not be able to give as much time and energy to any of them as you could if you gave yourself more room to focus.

          Advertising

          5. Barack Obama

          US President Barack Obama

            Among the many successful habits that Obama practices, one of the most significant is making it a point to have breakfast with his daughters and the first lady, help his daughters get ready for school, and have dinner with his family again in the evening. Like Obama, successful people are careful to strike a good work-life balance, working hard but also making sure to prioritize spending time with family.

            6. Stephen King

            Famous Fiction Writer Stephen King Playing Guitar

              The famous fiction writer Stephen King makes a habit of keeping his work space arranged the same way every day. He sits down to work at around the same time every day and in the same chair, has a glass of water, keeps his papers arranged in the same way each day, and listens to the same music. This is his way of getting himself ready to focus on working, and when you are focused on your work, you are bound to succeed.

              7. Franz Kafka

              Advertising

              Franz Kafka Writer

                Another famous fiction writer, Franz Kafka spent his days as an insurance agent but always made time to feed his creative urge. He would start writing at 10:30 p.m. and keep going into the early hours of the morning. His day job was very stressful and busy, but creative writing was his release. No matter how busy your day job, everyone should nurture their passions when they have time in order to stay motivated. And who knows … perhaps your passion will be your calling.

                8. David Zinczenko

                Men's Health Editor-In-Chief David Zinczenko

                  David Zinczenko, Editor-in-Chief of Men’s Health magazine, practices the habit of keeping healthy snacks and drinks around his office. This way he stays energized and won’t experience a sugar crash later in the day from eating unhealthy foods. Plus, when he already has snacks stocked, he doesn’t have to leave the office while he is working just to waste time buying food.

                  9. Cindy Ratzlaff

                  Cindy Ratzlaff, a consultant, speaker and author

                    Cindy Ratzlaff, a consultant, speaker and author, comes up with a “success goal” each day and writes it on her white board in her office. It’s then in front of her all day to remind her to ask herself before each action if the action will serve her chosen goal. Keeping focused on a goal brings purpose to each choice she makes, eliminating time-wasters and distractions.

                    Advertising

                    10. Albert Einstein

                    Theoretical Physicist Albert Einstein

                      Albert Einstein, theoretical physicist, philosopher and author, enjoyed taking the time to go for long walks on the beach or gazing at the ceiling during the workweek so that he could listen to what was going on in his mind. By spending some time in solitude, you can reach deep within yourself and focus on the thoughts in your head.

                      11. Warren Buffett

                      Warren Buffett CEO Berkshire Hathaway

                        Warren Buffett, the oracle of Omaha, likes to play online bridge with three other partners almost every Monday because of the emphasis it places on “playing a hand right rather than on playing it successfully.” Successful people know that luck comes from working hard over time and positioning themselves for success rather than hoping to just get lucky.

                        These successful individuals have great habits that work to help them stay successful. Develop some unique habits for yourself and soon you will be on your way to success and time well spent.

                        Featured photo credit: Silhouette of successful business man /KieferPix via shutterstock.com

                        More by this author

                        Affordable and chic clothes 16 Highly Recommended Budget And Chic Online Fashion Stores You Should Bookmark 30 ways to organize and clean your kitchen Kitchen Hacks: 31 Clever Ways To Organize And Clean Your Kitchen Tips to Wearing a Suit The Ultimate Suit Wearing Cheat Sheet Every Man Needs 14 Things Only Coffee Drinkers Would Understand Have You Tried All These 31 Coffees From Around The World? You Should!

                        Trending in Productivity

                        1 How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster 2 11 Ways to Be Productive And Happy At Once 3 What Is a Routine? 9 Ways Routines Make Your Life Easier 4 What Is a Habit? Understand It to Control It 100% 5 11 Important Things to Remember When Changing Habits

                        Read Next

                        Advertising
                        Advertising
                        Advertising

                        Last Updated on November 18, 2019

                        How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

                        How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

                        Everyone of my team members has a bucketload of tasks that they need to deal with every working day. On top of that, most of their tasks are either creativity tasks or problem solving tasks.

                        Despite having loads of tasks to handle, our team is able to stay creative and work towards our goals consistently.

                        How do we manage that?

                        I’m going to reveal to you how I helped my team get more things done in less time through the power of correct prioritization. A few minutes spent reading this article could literally save you thousands of hours over the long term. So, let’s get started with my method on how to prioritize:

                        The Scales Method – a productivity method I created several years ago.

                        How to Prioritize with the Scales Method

                          One of our new editors came to me the other day and told me how she was struggling to keep up with the many tasks she needed to handle and the deadlines she constantly needed to stick to.

                          At the end of each day, she felt like she had done a lot of things but often failed to come up with creative ideas and to get articles successfully published. From what she told me, it was obvious that she felt overwhelmed and was growing increasingly frustrated about failing to achieve her targets despite putting in extra hours most days.

                          After she listened to my advice – and I introduced her to the Scales Method – she immediately experienced a dramatic rise in productivity, which looked like this:

                          • She could produce three times more creative ideas for blog articles
                          • She could publish all her articles on time
                          • And she could finish all her work on time every day (no more overtime!)

                          Curious to find out how she did it? Read on for the step-by-step guide:

                          Advertising

                          1. Set Aside 10 Minutes for Planning

                          When it comes to tackling productivity issues, it makes sense to plan before taking action. However, don’t become so involved in planning that you become trapped in it and never move beyond first base.

                          My recommendation is to give yourself a specific time period for planning – but keep it short. Ideally, 10 or 15 minutes. This should be adequate to think about your plan.

                          Use this time to:

                          • Look at the big picture.
                          • Think about the current goal and target that you need/want to achieve.
                          • Lay out all the tasks you need to do.

                          2. Align Your Tasks with Your Goal

                          This is the core component that makes the Scales Method effective.

                          It works like this:

                          Take a look at all the tasks you’re doing, and review the importance of each of them. Specifically, measure a task’s importance by its cost and benefit.

                          By cost, I am referring to the effort needed per task (including time, money and other resources). The benefit is how closely the task can contribute to your goal.

                            To make this easier for you, I’ve listed below four combinations that will enable you to quickly and easily determine the priority of each of your tasks:

                            Low Cost + High Benefit

                            Advertising

                            Do these tasks first because they’re the simple ones to complete, yet help you get closer to your goal.

                            Approving artwork created for a sales brochure would likely fit this category. You could easily decide on whether you liked the artwork/layout, but your decision to approve would trigger the production of the leaflet and the subsequent sales benefits of sending it out to potential customers.

                            High Cost + High Benefit

                            Break the high cost task down into smaller ones. In other words, break the big task into mini ones that take less than an hour to complete. And then re-evaluate these small tasks and set their correct priority level.

                            Imagine if you were asked to write a product launch plan for a new diary-free protein powder supplement. Instead of trying to write the plan in one sitting – aim to write the different sections at different times (e.g., spend 30 minutes writing the introduction, one hour writing the body text, and 30 minutes writing the conclusion).

                            Low Cost + Low Benefit

                            This combination should be your lowest priority. Either give yourself 10-15 minutes to handle this task, or put these kind of tasks in between valuable tasks as a useful break.

                            These are probably necessary tasks (e.g., routine tasks like checking emails) but they don’t contribute much towards reaching your desired goal. Keep them way down your priority list.

                            High Cost + Low Benefit

                            Review if these tasks are really necessary. Think of ways to reduce the cost if you decide that the completion of the task is required.

                            Advertising

                            For instance, can any tools or systems help to speed up doing the task? In this category, you’re likely to find things like checking and updating sales contacts spreadsheets. This can be a fiddly and time-consuming thing to do without making mistakes. However, there are plenty of apps out there they can make this process instant and seamless.

                            Now, coming back to the editor who I referred to earlier, let’s take a look at her typical daily task list:

                              After listening to my advice, she broke down the High cost+ High benefit task into smaller ones. Her tasks then looked like this (in order of priority):

                                And for the task about promoting articles to different platforms, after reviewing its benefits, we decided to focus on the most effective platform only – thereby significantly lowering the associated time cost.

                                Bonus Tip: Tackling Tasks with Deadlines

                                Once you’ve evaluated your tasks, you’ll know the importance of each of them. This will immediately give you a crystal-clear picture on which tasks would help you to achieve more (in terms of achieving your goals). Sometimes, however, you won’t be able to decide every task’s priority because there’ll be deadlines set by external parties such as managers and agencies.

                                What to do in these cases?

                                Well, I suggest that after considering the importance and values of your current tasks, align the list with the deadlines and adjust the priorities accordingly.

                                For example, let’s dip into the editor’s world again.

                                Advertising

                                Some of the articles she edited needed to be published by specific dates. The Scales Method allows for this, and in this case, her amended task list would look something like this:

                                  Hopefully, you can now see how easy it is to evaluate the importance of tasks and how to order them in lists of priority.

                                  The Scales Method Is Different from Anything Else You’ve Tried

                                  By adopting the Scales Method, you’ll begin to correctly prioritize your work, and most importantly – boost your productivity by up to 10 times!

                                  And unlike other methods that don’t really explain how to decide the importance of a task, my method will help you break down each of your tasks into two parts: cost and benefits. My method will also help you to take follow-up action based on different cost and benefits combinations.

                                  Start right now by spending 10 minutes to evaluate your common daily tasks and how they align with your goal(s). Once you have this information, it’ll be super-easy to put your tasks into a priority list. All that remains, is that you kick off your next working day by following your new list.

                                  Trust me, once you begin using the Scales Method – you’ll never want to go back to your old ways of working.

                                  More to Boost Productivity

                                  Featured photo credit: Vector Stock via vectorstock.com

                                  Read Next