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11 Mistakes Billionaires Learned the Hard Way

11 Mistakes Billionaires Learned the Hard Way

It’s been said it’s easier to learn from your mistakes, but you don’t always have to, particularly in business. Working your way to the top can be extremely difficult and mistakes in the business world can be costly. It is important for the entrepreneur to learn not only from their successes, but also from their failures. Although there’s much to gain when it comes to experience, you can save a lot of time and money by learning through the mistakes of others.

Even today’s top grossers have had their dull moments. Here are 11 mistakes billionaires learned to avoid the hard way:

The 1 Percent
    1. Failure to research.

    When making an acquisition or starting a new business, research is essential. Is there competition? Is there a big enough market? Is your acquisition worthwhile? In 1999, the world’s richest man, Carlos Slim, did not do his research and acquired CompUSA for $800 million, only to see the company’s value plummet because desktop computers were quickly being replaced by laptop computers and other emerging technology.

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    2. Fixation on the wrong investments.

    Few things are worse than a missed opportunity. Focusing on the wrong investments can bring disastrous results. Take Bill Gate’s mistake of ignoring search engines, for example. Focusing on the loss of profit that came from piracy lead Microsoft to completely ignore the development of the search engine. This neglect left plenty of space for other companies, such as Google and Yahoo, to fill the gap. By the time Gates realized he had made a mistake, it was too late. Presently Bing has picked up some of the search engine market, but in 2011 it cost Microsoft $2.5 million more than it earned.

    3. Lack of communication.

    When offering goods or services, communication from the top directors to the employee team and from the employees to the customers is vital. You cannot expect the members of your team to immediately know what you are thinking and this is a mistake billionaire Larry Ellison experienced first hand. After acquiring Island Air, Paul Casey was quickly appointed as CEO. The lack of communication that ensued regarding the changes resulted in various flight delays (one of which was seven hours long) and many disgruntled customers.

    4. Cutting vital costs.

    Maximizing profits and cutting unnecessary costs is a natural part of business. However, it’s easy to get lost in the profit frenzy and so one should be careful such costs do not damage quality or the brand. Take for example the case of billion-dollar company Hewlett Packard. Once known for innovation, everything started to go wrong once innovation was replaced by cost cutting. Current owner and CEO Meg Whitman has seen stock price plummet 39% from one year ago.

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    Billionaire Status

      5. Letting good opportunities go.

      If you think you have a good idea or your research has proven your idea to be a sound choice, go for it. Do not let a good opportunity go by, because just like you are capable of coming up with great ideas, so are other people. Larry Page of Google learned this the hard way. In 2003, after he noticed the success of Friendster, he offered to purchase the then social media giant instead of focusing on developing his own. The offer was turned down and the result was disastrous, as Facebook swooped in to take the social media market by storm. Google+ was eventually released in 2011, and to this day has yet to match the social capital and earnings of Zuckerberg’s giant.

      6. Refusing to explore other options.

      Not all acquisitions are in great shape, and sometimes the industry you want to focus on may be shrinking. These things can difficult to accept but it is important to know when to explore other ventures. Billionaire Warren Buffet admits to having made this mistake when purchasing Berkshire Hathaway on emotional impulse in 1964. A New England textile company at the time, he kept the original business running at a loss for 20 years, before finally giving up and focusing on the company’s other, more profitable ventures.

      7. Cultivating a negative image.

      When you are a billionaire and have a brand to protect, you must behave like it. Anything negative that is said about you will reflect badly in your company and this is a mistake Alice Walton, heiress of the Walmart empire, has committed. Walmart is already involved in numerous controversies regarding the giant’s effect on small businesses and wages paid to workers. Walton’s own Texas escapades, which included a DWI, are negative publicity and include a mug shot no PR executive can wipe from Walmart’s already negative record.

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      8. Allowing credibility to plummet.

      A lot of business ventures depend on credit lines. It is important to remember that this is not only about paying your bills, but also about paying them on time. Used-to-be billionaire Eike Batista saw his oil and mineral empire plummet from more than $30 billion to a mere $200 million once key stakeholders lost trust in him after he failed to deliver the results he’d promised. Once Batista lost credibility in one area, he quickly lost it in all of them, and was forced to watch his empire shrink.

      9. Hiring the wrong people.

      Hiring is an important part of every business. Human capital is what makes a company prosper, but when hiring, keep in mind the ideals of each new hire and whether or not they fit with the company. A bad hire in an important position could be disastrous. Billionaire philanthropist Manoj Bhargava admits the worst business mistake he’s ever made is hiring the wrong people—those who enter his charity wholesale business hoping to help themselves instead of helping others.

      10. Being afraid of postponing.

      It is important to jump in to big opportunities; however, it is also important to do self-assessment to know whether or not you and your team are prepared for the next move. Billionaire Oprah Winfrey cites her TV network, OWN, as one of her biggest mistakes. Her blunder? Launching when she wasn’t ready to launch and doing so only because she said she would.

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      11. Taxes? What taxes?

      It hasn’t been proven whether or not billionaires avoid taxes more than the average citizen. However, a tax scandal is one of the most difficult things to recuperate from. The Beanie Baby creator, billionaire Ty Warner, barely escaped jail for allegedly owing $25 million in taxes, a report that will undoubtedly damage both his brand and reputation.

      Billionaire Make It Rain

        These are 11 mistakes that forced billionaires to clean up their act. As an aspiring billionaire, you should be able to learn from the mistakes of others and take these eleven points to heart as you continue your journey.

        Have you hit a stumbling block before that taught you a valuable lesson? If so, I would love to hear about them in the comments below.

        Featured photo credit: Flickr via flickr.com

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        Joel Goldstein

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        Last Updated on October 15, 2019

        Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

        Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

        Procrastination is very literally the opposite of productivity. To produce something is to pull it forward, while to procrastinate is to push it forward — to tomorrow, to next week, or ultimately to never.

        Procrastination fills us with shame — we curse ourselves for our laziness, our inability to focus on the task at hand, our tendency to be easily led into easier and more immediate gratifications. And with good reason: for the most part, time spent procrastinating is time spent not doing things that are, in some way or other, important to us.

        There is a positive side to procrastination, but it’s important not to confuse procrastination at its best with everyday garden-variety procrastination.

        Sometimes — sometimes! — procrastination gives us the time we need to sort through a thorny issue or to generate ideas. In those rare instances, we should embrace procrastination — even as we push it away the rest of the time.

        Why we procrastinate after all

        We procrastinate for a number of reasons, some better than others. One reason we procrastinate is that, while we know what we want to do, we need time to let the ideas “ferment” before we are ready to sit down and put them into action.

        Some might call this “creative faffing”; I call it, following copywriter Ray Del Savio’s lead, “concepting”.[1]

        Whatever you choose to call it, it’s the time spent dreaming up what you want to say or do, weighing ideas in your mind, following false leads and tearing off on mental wild goose chases, and generally thinking things through.

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        To the outside observer, concepting looks like… well, like nothing much at all. Maybe you’re leaning back in your chair, feet up, staring at the wall or ceiling, or laying in bed apparently dozing, or looking out over the skyline or feeding pigeons in the park or fiddling with the Japanese vinyl toys that stand watch over your desk.

        If ideas are the lifeblood of your work, you have to make time for concepting, and you have to overcome the sensation— often overpowering in our work-obsessed culture — that faffing, however creative, is not work.

        So, is procrastination bad?

        Yes it is.

        Don’t fool yourself into thinking that you’re “concepting” when in fact you’re just not sure what you’re supposed to be doing.

        Spending an hour staring at the wall while thinking up the perfect tagline for a marketing campaign is creative faffing; staring at the wall for an hour because you don’t know how to come up with a tagline, or don’t know the product you’re marketing well enough to come up with one, is just wasting time.

        Lack of definition is perhaps the biggest friend of your procrastination demons. When we’re not sure what to do — whether because we haven’t planned thoroughly enough, we haven’t specified the scope of what we hope to accomplish in the immediate present, or we lack important information, skills, or resources to get the job done.

        It’s easy to get distracted or to trick ourselves into spinning our wheels doing nothing. It takes our mind off the uncomfortable sensation of failing to make progress on something important.

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        The answer to this is in planning and scheduling. Rather than giving yourself an unspecified length of time to perform an unspecified task (“Let’s see, I guess I’ll work on that spreadsheet for a while”) give yourself a limited amount of time to work on a clearly defined task (“Now I’ll enter the figures from last months sales report into the spreadsheet for an hour”).

        Giving yourself a deadline, even an artificial one, helps build a sense of urgency and also offers the promise of time to “screw around” later, once more important things are done.

        For larger projects, planning plays a huge role in whether or not you’ll spend too much time procrastinating to reach the end reasonably quickly.

        A good plan not only lists the steps you have to take to reach the end, but takes into account the resources, knowledge and inputs from other people you’re going to need to perform those steps.

        Instead of futzing around doing nothing because you don’t have last month’s sales report, getting the report should be a step in the project.

        Otherwise, you’ll spend time cooling your heels, justifying your lack of action as necessary: you aren’t wasting time because you want to, but because you have to.

        How bad procrastination can be

        Our mind can often trick us into procrastinating, often to the point that we don’t realize we’re procrastinating at all.

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        After all, we have lots and lots of things to do; if we’re working on something, aren’t we being productive – even if the one big thing we need to work on doesn’t get done?

        One way this plays out is that we scan our to-do list, skipping over the big challenging projects in favor of the short, easy projects. At the end of the day, we feel very productive: we’ve crossed twelve things off our list!

        That big project we didn’t work on gets put onto the next day’s list, and when the same thing happens, it gets moved forward again. And again.

        Big tasks often present us with the problem above – we aren’t sure what to do exactly, so we look for other ways to occupy ourselves.

        In many cases too, big tasks aren’t really tasks at all; they’re aggregates of many smaller tasks. If something’s sitting on your list for a long time, each day getting skipped over in favor of more immediately doable tasks, it’s probably not very well thought out.

        You’re actively resisting it because you don’t really know what it is. Try to break it down into a set of small tasks, something more like the tasks you are doing in place of the one big task you aren’t doing.

        More consequences of procrastination can be found in this article:

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        8 Dreadful Effects of Procrastination That Can Destroy Your Life

        Procrastination, a technical failure

        Procrastination is, more often than not, a sign of a technical failure, not a moral failure.

        It’s not because we’re bad people that we procrastinate. Most times, procrastination serves as a symptom of something more fundamentally wrong with the tasks we’ve set ourselves.

        It’s important to keep an eye on our procrastinating tendencies, to ask ourselves whenever we notice ourselves pushing things forward what it is about the task we’ve set ourselves that simply isn’t working for us.

        Featured photo credit: chuttersnap via unsplash.com

        Reference

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