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10 Things Tough Leaders Do Differently

10 Things Tough Leaders Do Differently

Tough leaders have to walk a tightrope. They have to balance demanding and obtaining real results with inspiring and leading their staff impeccably. Read on to discover how these tough leaders do things differently.

“Leadership is lifting a person’s vision to high sights, the raising of a person’s performance to a higher standard, the building of a personality beyond its normal limitations.” —Peter Drucker

1. They set a great example.

A successful manager will be able to lead effectively without being a tyrant or being a ‘yes’ man or woman. Tough leaders set themselves incredibly high standards. They have clear objectives, work hard and are punctual and polite. They rightly demand the same standards from their teams, as they lead by example.

“It is absurd that a man should rule others, who cannot rule himself.” – Latin Proverb

 2. They can cope with setbacks.

“Anyone can hold the helm when the sea is calm.” —Publilius Syrus

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Failure may stalk a company in recessionary times when it loses a contract or has lost the competitive edge against a rival. The tough leaders will be able to re-align the objectives by skilful negotiation. In doing so, they will also be capable of learning lessons from the failure without demoralizing staff.

3. They know when to say no.

“The art of leadership is saying no, not saying yes. It is very easy to say yes.” – Tony Blair

Leaders have to say no to demands by staff and senior management. There may be problems with financial targets, marketing strategy or reduction in costs. But in saying no, they will be able to come up with solutions. In doing so, they will be able to involve all the team by asking for ideas and ways to improve performance.

4. They give constructive feedback.

Tough leaders will avoid confrontation and emotion. These are damaging when giving feedback. Instead, they will concentrate on:

  • Praising the employee for the good things first
  • Giving specific examples of what was not done well.
  • Asking the staff member what and how this can be improved.
  • Re-aligning job objectives with these points in mind.
  • Offering further training or assistance in specific areas.

5. They help their staff develop.

This is where clear job descriptions containing specific objectives and deadlines come into play. The good manager will have these in place so they can be used as a guideline for staff training. They can help to identify strengths and weaknesses. They are really useful in highlighting gaps in skills and competencies.

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6. They show gratitude for work well done.

Everyone, including the tough leader, craves praise, appreciation and thanks. This is essential for the following reasons:

  • Builds a team spirit
  • Increases motivation
  • Creates a better work environment
  • Helps to create a learning culture
  • Increases morale

Research led by Amy Edmondson at the Harvard Business School shows that employees perform better and feel more secure, when praised and appreciated.

7. They never bully their staff.

“A great person attracts great people and knows how to hold them together”. —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

Successful leaders know that their staff is the best asset the company has, when managed well. The tyrannical approach belongs to another century. Studies show that staffs respond better when:

  • They are appreciated
  • There are incentives to perform better
  • They are not insulted or belittled
  • They are never threatened
  • They are never sexually harassed
  • They are never bullied

8. They never play the blame game.

“A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit.” —John Maxwell

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Some managers delight in finding a scapegoat when things go pear-shaped. In many cases, this is unjustified, as the fault lies in poor management or bad decisions made by the boss. Passing the blame on to an employee who was marginally involved is the mark of a weak and ineffectual leader.

9. They talk openly about expectations.

Usually, expectations are only mentioned in job descriptions and in performance reviews. The tough leaders know that these have to be kept to the forefront and should be mentioned in normal conversations, almost on a daily basis. In this way, they can provide motivation, inspiration and a little fear, too.

10. They are not afraid to make difficult decisions.

“A cowardly leader is the most dangerous of men.” —Stephen King

Tough leaders are faced with a growing number of uncertainties in a very difficult economic climate. They have to come to terms with decreased consumer confidence, political decisions, not to mention technology which is changing at a dizzying speed. While negotiation skills will play a vital role, the tough leaders can show that they can navigate in uncertain environments with confidence. Above all, they are not afraid of making difficult decisions in a very precarious environment

As we have seen, the hard image of tyrannical managers who rule their staff with a rod of iron is no longer effective in the second millennium. Overall, the tough leader has to make great demands on his staff while at the same time, showing empathy and appreciation.

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“The challenge of leadership is to be strong, but not rude; be kind, but not weak; be bold, but not bully; be thoughtful, but not lazy; be humble, but not timid; be proud, but not arrogant; have humor, but without folly.” —Jim Rohn

Have you worked with tough leaders? What inspired you? Were there problems?  Let us know in the comments below

Featured photo credit: Meeting staff/Dell’s Official Flickr Page via flickr.com

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Robert Locke

Freelance writer

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Last Updated on September 20, 2018

8 Ways to Train Your Brain to Learn Faster and Remember More

8 Ways to Train Your Brain to Learn Faster and Remember More

You go to the gym to train your muscles. You run outside or go for hikes to train your endurance. Or, maybe you do neither of those, but still wish you exercised more.

Well, here is how to train one of the most important parts of your body: your brain.

When you train your brain, you will:

  • Avoid embarrassing situations. You remember his face, but what was his name?
  • Be a faster learner in all sorts of different skills. No problem for you to pick up a new language or new management skill.
  • Avoid diseases that hit as you get older. Alzheimer’s will not be affecting you.

So how to train your brain and improve your cognitive skills?

1. Work your memory

Twyla Tharp, a NYC-based renowned choreographer has come up with the following memory workout:

When she watches one of her performances, she tries to remember the first twelve to fourteen corrections she wants to discuss with her cast without writing them down.

If you think this is anything less than a feat, then think again. In her book The Creative Habit she says that most people cannot remember more than three.

The practice of both remembering events or things and then discussing them with others has actually been supported by brain fitness studies.

Memory activities that engage all levels of brain operation—receiving, remembering and thinking—help to improve the function of the brain.

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Now, you may not have dancers to correct, but you may be required to give feedback on a presentation, or your friends may ask you what interesting things you saw at the museum. These are great opportunities to practically train your brain by flexing your memory muscles.

What is the simplest way to help yourself remember what you see? Repetition.

For example, say you just met someone new:

“Hi, my name is George”

Don’t just respond with, “Nice to meet you”. Instead, say, “Nice to meet you George.”

Got it? Good.

2. Do something different repeatedly

By actually doing something new over and over again, your brain wires new pathways that help you do this new thing better and faster.

Think back to when you were three years old. You surely were strong enough to hold a knife and a fork just fine. Yet, when you were eating all by yourself, you were creating a mess.

It was not a matter of strength, you see. It was a matter of cultivating more and better neural pathways that would help you eat by yourself just like an adult does.

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And guess what? With enough repetition you made that happen!

But how does this apply to your life right now?

Say you are a procrastinator. The more you don’t procrastinate, the more you teach your brain not to wait for the last minute to make things happen.

Now, you might be thinking “Duh, if only not procrastinating could be that easy!”

Well, it can be. By doing something really small, that you wouldn’t normally do, but is in the direction of getting that task done, you will start creating those new precious neural pathways.

So if you have been postponing organizing your desk, just take one paper and put in its right place. Or, you can go even smaller. Look at one piece of paper and decide where to put it: Trash? Right cabinet? Another room? Give it to someone?

You don’t actually need to clean up that paper; you only need to decide what you need to do with it.

That’s how small you can start. And yet, those neural pathways are still being built. Gradually, you will transform yourself from a procrastinator to an in-the-moment action taker.

3. Learn something new

It might sound obvious, but the more you use your brain, the better its going to perform for you.

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For example, learning a new instrument improves your skill of translating something you see (sheet music) to something you actually do (playing the instrument).

Learning a new language exposes your brain to a different way of thinking, a different way of expressing yourself.

You can even literally take it a step further, and learn how to dance. Studies indicate that learning to dance helps seniors avoid Alzheimer’s. Not bad, huh?

4. Follow a brain training program

The Internet world can help you improve your brain function while lazily sitting on your couch. A clinically proven program like BrainHQ can help you improve your memory, or think faster, by just following their brain training exercises.

5. Work your body

You knew this one was coming didn’t you? Yes indeed, exercise does not just work your body; it also improves the fitness of your brain.

Even briefly exercising for 20 minutes facilitates information processing and memory functions. But it’s not just that–exercise actually helps your brain create those new neural connections faster. You will learn faster, your alertness level will increase, and you get all that by moving your body.

Now, if you are not already a regular exerciser, and already feel guilty that you are not helping your brain by exercising more, try a brain training exercise program like Exercise Bliss.

Remember, just like we discussed in #2, by training your brain to do something new repeatedly, you are actually changing yourself permanently.

6. Spend time with your loved ones

If you want optimal cognitive abilities, then you’ve got to have meaningful relationships in your life.  Talking with others and engaging with your loved ones helps you think more clearly, and it can also lift your mood.

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If you are an extrovert, this holds even more weight for you. At a class at Stanford University, I learned that extroverts actually use talking to other people as a way to understand and process their own thoughts.

I remember that the teacher told us that after a personality test said she was an extrovert, she was surprised. She had always thought of herself as an introvert. But then, she realized how much talking to others helped her frame her own thoughts, so she accepted her new-found status as an extrovert.

7. Avoid crossword puzzles

Many of us, when we think of brain fitness, think of crossword puzzles. And it’s true–crossword puzzles do improve our fluency, yet studies show they are not enough by themselves.

Are they fun? Yes. Do they sharpen your brain? Not really.

Of course, if you are doing this for fun, then by all means go ahead. If you are doing it for brain fitness, then you might want to choose another activity

8. Eat right – and make sure dark chocolate is included

Foods like fish, fruits, and vegetables help your brain perform optimally. Yet, you might not know that dark chocolate gives your brain a good boost as well.

When you eat chocolate, your brain produces dopamine. And dopamine helps you learn faster and remember better. Not to mention, chocolate contains flavonols, antioxidants, which also improve your brain functions.

So next time you have something difficult to do, make sure you grab a bite or two of dark chocolate!

The bottom line

Now that you know how to train your brain, it’s actually time to start doing.

Don’t just consume this content and then go on with your life as if nothing has changed. Put this knowledge into action and become smarter than ever!

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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