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10 Things Tough Leaders Do Differently

10 Things Tough Leaders Do Differently

Tough leaders have to walk a tightrope. They have to balance demanding and obtaining real results with inspiring and leading their staff impeccably. Read on to discover how these tough leaders do things differently.

“Leadership is lifting a person’s vision to high sights, the raising of a person’s performance to a higher standard, the building of a personality beyond its normal limitations.” —Peter Drucker

1. They set a great example.

A successful manager will be able to lead effectively without being a tyrant or being a ‘yes’ man or woman. Tough leaders set themselves incredibly high standards. They have clear objectives, work hard and are punctual and polite. They rightly demand the same standards from their teams, as they lead by example.

“It is absurd that a man should rule others, who cannot rule himself.” – Latin Proverb

 2. They can cope with setbacks.

“Anyone can hold the helm when the sea is calm.” —Publilius Syrus

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Failure may stalk a company in recessionary times when it loses a contract or has lost the competitive edge against a rival. The tough leaders will be able to re-align the objectives by skilful negotiation. In doing so, they will also be capable of learning lessons from the failure without demoralizing staff.

3. They know when to say no.

“The art of leadership is saying no, not saying yes. It is very easy to say yes.” – Tony Blair

Leaders have to say no to demands by staff and senior management. There may be problems with financial targets, marketing strategy or reduction in costs. But in saying no, they will be able to come up with solutions. In doing so, they will be able to involve all the team by asking for ideas and ways to improve performance.

4. They give constructive feedback.

Tough leaders will avoid confrontation and emotion. These are damaging when giving feedback. Instead, they will concentrate on:

  • Praising the employee for the good things first
  • Giving specific examples of what was not done well.
  • Asking the staff member what and how this can be improved.
  • Re-aligning job objectives with these points in mind.
  • Offering further training or assistance in specific areas.

5. They help their staff develop.

This is where clear job descriptions containing specific objectives and deadlines come into play. The good manager will have these in place so they can be used as a guideline for staff training. They can help to identify strengths and weaknesses. They are really useful in highlighting gaps in skills and competencies.

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6. They show gratitude for work well done.

Everyone, including the tough leader, craves praise, appreciation and thanks. This is essential for the following reasons:

  • Builds a team spirit
  • Increases motivation
  • Creates a better work environment
  • Helps to create a learning culture
  • Increases morale

Research led by Amy Edmondson at the Harvard Business School shows that employees perform better and feel more secure, when praised and appreciated.

7. They never bully their staff.

“A great person attracts great people and knows how to hold them together”. —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

Successful leaders know that their staff is the best asset the company has, when managed well. The tyrannical approach belongs to another century. Studies show that staffs respond better when:

  • They are appreciated
  • There are incentives to perform better
  • They are not insulted or belittled
  • They are never threatened
  • They are never sexually harassed
  • They are never bullied

8. They never play the blame game.

“A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit.” —John Maxwell

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Some managers delight in finding a scapegoat when things go pear-shaped. In many cases, this is unjustified, as the fault lies in poor management or bad decisions made by the boss. Passing the blame on to an employee who was marginally involved is the mark of a weak and ineffectual leader.

9. They talk openly about expectations.

Usually, expectations are only mentioned in job descriptions and in performance reviews. The tough leaders know that these have to be kept to the forefront and should be mentioned in normal conversations, almost on a daily basis. In this way, they can provide motivation, inspiration and a little fear, too.

10. They are not afraid to make difficult decisions.

“A cowardly leader is the most dangerous of men.” —Stephen King

Tough leaders are faced with a growing number of uncertainties in a very difficult economic climate. They have to come to terms with decreased consumer confidence, political decisions, not to mention technology which is changing at a dizzying speed. While negotiation skills will play a vital role, the tough leaders can show that they can navigate in uncertain environments with confidence. Above all, they are not afraid of making difficult decisions in a very precarious environment

As we have seen, the hard image of tyrannical managers who rule their staff with a rod of iron is no longer effective in the second millennium. Overall, the tough leader has to make great demands on his staff while at the same time, showing empathy and appreciation.

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“The challenge of leadership is to be strong, but not rude; be kind, but not weak; be bold, but not bully; be thoughtful, but not lazy; be humble, but not timid; be proud, but not arrogant; have humor, but without folly.” —Jim Rohn

Have you worked with tough leaders? What inspired you? Were there problems?  Let us know in the comments below

Featured photo credit: Meeting staff/Dell’s Official Flickr Page via flickr.com

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Robert Locke

Author of Ziger the Tiger Stories, a health enthusiast specializing in relationships, life improvement and mental health.

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Last Updated on August 6, 2020

Why Working 9 to 5 Is Outdated

Why Working 9 to 5 Is Outdated

Bristol is the most congested city in England. Whenever I have to work at the office, I ride there, like most of us do. Furthermore, I always make sure to go at off hours; otherwise, the roads are jam-packed with cars, buses, bikes, even pedestrians. Why is that? Because everyone is working a traditional 9 to 5 work day.

Where did the “9 to 5” Come From?

It all started back in 1946. The United States government implemented the 40 hour work week for all federal employees, and all companies adopted the practice afterwards. That’s 67 years with the same schedule. Let’s think about all the things that have changed in the 67 years:

  • We went to the moon, and astronauts now live in space on the ISS.

  • Computers used to take up entire rooms and took hours to make a single calculation. Now we have more powerful computers in our purses and back pockets with our smartphones.

  • Lots of employees can now telecommute to the office from hundreds, and even thousands of miles away.

In 1946 a 9-5 job made sense because we had time after 5pm for a social life, a family life. Now we’re constantly connected to other people and the office, with the Internet, email on our smartphones, and hashtags in our movies and television shows. There is no downtime anymore.

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Different Folks, Different Strokes

Enjoying your downtime is an important part of life. It recharges your batteries and lets you be more productive. Allowing people to balance life and work can provide them with much needed perspective and motivation to see the bigger picture of what they are trying to achieve.

Some people are just more productive when they’re working at their optimal time of day, after feeling well rested and personally fulfilled.  For some that can be  from 4 a.m. to 9 a.m; for others, it could be  2 p.m. to 7 p.m.

People have their own rhythms and routines. It would be great if we could sync our work schedule to match. Simply put, the imposed 8-hour work day can be a creativity and morale killer for the average person in today’s world.

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Productivity and Trust Killer

Fostering creativity among employees is not always an easy endeavor, but perhaps a good place to start is by simply not tying their tasks and goals to a fixed time period. Let them work on their to-do list at their own pace, and chances are, you’ll get the best out of your employee who feels empowered instead of babysat.

That’s not to say that you should  allow your team to run wild and do whatever they want, but restricting them to a 9 to 5 time frame can quickly demoralize people. Set parameters and deadlines, and let them work at their own creative best with the understanding that their work is crucial to the functioning of the entire team.

Margaret Heffernan, an entrepreneur who previously worked in broadcasting, noted to Inc that from her experience, “treating employees like grown-ups made it more likely that they would behave the same way.” The principle here is to have your employees work to get things done, not to just follow the hands on the clock.

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A Flexible Remote Working Policy

Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer famously recalled all her remote workers, saying she wanted to improve innovation and collaboration, but was that the right decision? We’ve all said that we’re often more productive in a half day working from home than a full day working in the office, right? So why not let your employees work remotely from home?

There are definitely varying schools of thought on remote working. Some believe that innovation and collaboration can only happen in a boardroom with markers, whiteboards and post-it notes and of course, this can be true for some. But do a few great brainstorms trump a team that feels a little less stressed and a little more free?

Those who champion remote working often note that these employees are not counting the clock, worried about getting home, cooking dinner or rushing through errands post-work. No one works their 9-5 straight without breaks here and there.  Allowing some time for remote working means employees can handle some non-work related tasks and feel more accomplished throughout the day. Also, sometimes we all need to have a taste of working in our pajamas, right?

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It’ll be interesting to see how many traditional companies and industries start giving their employees more freedom with their work schedule. And how many end up rescinding their policies like Yahoo did.

What are your thoughts of the traditional 9-5 schedule and what are you doing to help foster your team’s productivity and creativity? Hit the comments and let us know.

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