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10 Step Power-Method To Systematically Solve Virtually Any Problem

10 Step Power-Method To Systematically Solve Virtually Any Problem

What is the first thing you do when you have a problem? Find solutions?

The first thing you have to do to resolve any problem is not to find solutions. It’s to ask yourself important questions.

Similar to a mathematical problem you had to solve in elementary school, there is always a question at the end of each problem. If there isn’t a specific question at the end of each problem, you won’t know what to solve.

Below are 10 steps you can follow to systematically solve any problem you have. At the end of each step, you’ll find suggested questions that help you solve your problem.

1. Assess if your problem needs to be solved.

Why find solutions to a problem when your problem doesn’t need to be solved in the first place?

Your mind loves to create problems for you to solve. It’s mentally stimulating. But sometimes, if you take a step back and assess your problem, you may find that your problem may not be something you need to solve.

For example, my friend told me that drinking coke is his vice. But his vice isn’t necessary something that needs to be solved. If the benefits he receives from drinking coke outweigh the benefits of not drinking it, why does he need to change his habit? Even if he tries to change, it’s highly likely he would fail because of the benefit he receives from drinking coke.

So whenever you face a new problem, first ask yourself why you want to solve the problem. Assess the cost and benefits of solving and not solving the problem and determine if the problem is still a problem you need to solve.

Suggested Questions:

  • Why do you want to solve this problem?
  • What are the benefits and costs of solving or not solving this problem?
  • Is the benefit of solving this problem more than the benefit of not solving this problem?
  • Is the cost of solving this problem more than the cost of not solving this problem?

2. Identify the underlying problem clearly.

Every time you have a problem, go deeper and ask yourself if there is a deeper underlying problem. What you define as the problem may just be a symptom.

For example, you have a constant headache. Taking medicine will only resolve this problem short-term. It will only help you ease your pain for now. Your headache may just be  a symptom of the problem.

The real problem could be a lack of sleep and dehydration. And if you go deeper and understand why you allow yourself so little sleep, you may find that the bigger problem you have is poor time management or work stress.

Identifying the underlying problem helps you get to the root of the issue. Solving it helps you remove all the small, recurring symptoms that it creates.

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If your problem isn’t clearly defined, then there is no point in finding solutions to it. Because you will end up solving the wrong problem or a problem that is of little value to you.

Suggested Questions:

  • What is the underlying problem here?
  • Is the problem you have defined a symptom instead?
  • What could be causing your current problem now?

3. Define specific and measurable objectives.

Now that you have defined your problems clearly, you can start to develop a strategic plan to tackle your problem.

But before you think of solutions, think of the objectives you are trying to achieve first. Because your problem will never be resolved if you do not have specific and measurable objectives to tell you that your problem has been resolved.

For example, you have identified that your problem is not having enough money to support yourself.

Finding more ways to earn money is good but without a clear objective you can’t check at any point in time if you have resolved your problem or not.

However, if you have determined your objective is to earn $5,000 each month in order to solve a financial problem, you will know that you are beginning to solve your problem when you do earn $5,000 in a month.

Moreover, it’s easier to come up with strategies and test their effectiveness when you have specific and measurable objectives defined.

Suggested Questions:

  • What are your objectives?
  • What are you trying to achieve by resolving this problem?
  • Are your objectives specific and measurable?
  • Does your objectives let you know your progress at any point in time?
  • Does your objectives help you determine if you have solved your problem or not?

4. Come up with as many solutions as you can.

The key to this step is to not filter any ideas you have.

No matter how crazy or how impossible your ideas may sound at first, write them down. Think about the constraints later (discussed in next step.) For now, just let your mind think freely and come up with as many solutions as possible.

For example, if you want to spend 2 hours more each week with your family, think of all the things you are willing to give up for your family. It could be spending less time watching TV, cutting down your commute time or spending less time at work. Even if they don’t seem possible at first, don’t dismiss them yet.

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If you are lost, look for other people who have the same problem as you and understand how they have solved their problem. Their experience will give you great insights into how to solve your problem.

Suggested Questions:

  • What can you do to reach your objectives?
  • What do you think is impossible to do but could help you achieve your objectives?
  • How can you achieve your objectives if you aren’t limited by any constraints?
  • Who has the same problem as you?
  • How did they solve their problem?

5. Determine your constraints and refine your solutions.

Now that you have come up with solutions, it’s time to determine your constraints. Your constraints could be time, deadlines, money, resources or even fears that are blocking you from reaching your objectives.

Using the same example above, you have identified that to have more time for your family the solution is to spend less time at work. However, you feel that it’s not possible to knock off work time because you have so many things to do.

Determine if your constraints are true or just assumptions. Can you eliminate your constraints? Perhaps some of your work doesn’t need to be completed urgently.

Even if your constraints are true and you can’t eliminate them, use them to help you come up with better solutions. Combine your constraints with your initial solution and ask yourself a better question.

So for the example above, ask yourself questions such as:

  • How do I knock off work time while completing the work I need to produce? (Maybe I can trade tasks with my colleagues and do the work that I can do more efficiently.)
  • How can I do my work faster and produce the same outcome? (Maybe I can improve my personal workflow or change the existing way of doing things.)

Suggested Questions:

  • What constraints do you have that prevent you from solving your problem?
  • Is your constraint true or just an assumption?
  • Can you eliminate the constraints you have?
  • What questions can you ask yourself to come up with a better solution?
  • How can you do things differently but yet produce the same results?

6. Pick the best solution.

Having many solutions is good, but it’s important to pick one solution and focus on it.

To pick the best solution, go through your list of solutions and identify the solution that will give you the most results but takes the least time, effort and resources.

Why should you do this?

Implementing the solution that produce the most results will be fine if your solution works out. But what if it doesn’t? You need to think about what you will lose if your solution fails completely. Is it something you can live with?

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Choose a solution which you can implement quickly and test if it works or not.

However, bear in mind, don’t pick the solution that is quick to implement but doesn’t produce the result you want. Always think of the results a solution can potentially provide, then implement the solution.

Suggested Questions:

  • How well can this solution solve your problem and meet your objectives?
  • How much time, effort and resources do you need to implement this solution?
  • Which solutions give you the most results but takes the least time, effort and resources?
  • If this solution fails, can you live with it?
  • Will this solution provide the results you desire?

7. Break the solution down into small action steps.

If you don’t make your solution actionable and easy for you to do, you won’t do it.

Let’s say you have a messy home and your solution is to clean it up. But cleaning it up seems like a lot of work. So what do you do?

You break it into smaller tasks that you can do within 5 – 30 minutes. For example:

  • Put the books on the table back into the cupboard.
  • Empty the trash.

Instead of tackling your problem or implementing your solution fully, chunk it down to bite size so that you can do a bit each day without overwhelming yourself.

Suggested Questions:

  • What do you need to do to implement this solution?
  • How can you break the solution down into small action steps?
  • What can you do within 5 to 30 minutes?
  • Are the action steps manageable or still too overwhelming?
  • How can you break your action steps even further?

8. Ask for help.

You don’t have to solve your problem alone. But you also don’t want to turn your problem into other people’s problem.

After you break down your solution into small actionable steps, it’ll be easier for you to ask others for help, and others are more likely to help you because you will have made it simple for them to help you.

Go through your list of action steps, pick tasks that you think others can do better and faster than you. And simply ask others for help. It doesn’t have to be restricted to friends and family. You can hire a virtual assistant online or someone professional to help you implement your strategy.

Apart from helping you with action steps, you can also ask or hire someone to be your accountability partner. For example, hiring a trainer to help you lose weight.

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You will report your progress to that person every week and tell him or her what you are going to do next week. Having someone holding you accountable will keep you on track.

Suggested Questions:

  • What action steps are easy enough that others are willing to help you?
  • What action steps can others do better and faster than you?
  • Who will be suitable to help you with these tasks?
  • Do you need someone professional to help you with some of the action steps?
  • Who can you seek or hire to be your accountability partner?

9. Prioritize, schedule and follow up.

For the remaining action steps, prioritize them according to importance. Similar to step #6, pick the action steps that take the less time and effort to do but give you the most results.

You want to start off with some easy tasks to get your momentum going and let them build up your confidence.

Pick a few action steps that you think you can complete in a week and schedule them. Then, find a time each week to schedule your next action steps for the week.

For those action steps that you have outsourced to others in step #8, you also need to schedule a time to follow up with the other party and check their progress.

This step is crucial because it minimizes procrastination. If you don’t put your action steps on your calendar, you most likely won’t do it.

Suggested Questions:

  • What are three to five action steps that you can complete this week?
  • When would you be doing these action steps?
  • What actions do you need to take next week?
  • When would you be following up on the action steps that you have outsourced?
  • Have you scheduled these action steps on your calendar?

10. Take action and go back to the previous steps if necessary.

After you have scheduled your action steps, take action accordingly. If you are stuck, go back to any of the previous steps and revise your strategy.

Don’t be afraid to start all over again. You have already gained knowledge and experience in solving the problem from this process.

Even if you are not stuck, it’s good to take a step back and see if you are solving the correct problem, using the most effective strategies and making progress.

Also, check if you have already resolved the problem with the objectives you established in step #3. If you have resolved your problem, there’s no need to carry out the other miscellaneous action steps. Just celebrate what you have achieved so far and congratulate yourself for a job well done.

Suggested Questions:

  • Are the actions that you have taken producing any results?
  • Are you feeling stuck or not seeing any progress?
  • Which step do you need to go back to and revise your strategy?
  • Have your objectives in step #3 been met?
  • If so, do you still need to carry out the other miscellaneous action steps?

Featured photo credit: Worried!/Alon via flickr.com

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Last Updated on December 10, 2019

How to Stay Motivated and Reach Your Big Goals in Life

How to Stay Motivated and Reach Your Big Goals in Life

It is hardly a secret that the key to successfully accomplishing one goal after another is staying motivated. There are, of course, tasks which successful people may not like at all, yet they find motivation to complete them because they recognize how each particular task serves a greater goal.

So how to stay motivated most of the time? Here are 5 simple yet effective ways on how to stay motivated and get what you want:

1. Find Your Good Reasons

Anything you do, no matter how simple, has a number of good reasons behind it.

You may not be able to find good reasons to do some tasks at first but, if you take just a few moments to analyze them, you will easily spot something good. We also have many tasks which don’t need any reasoning at all – we’ve been doing them for so long that they feel natural.

If you’re ever stuck with some tasks you hate and there seems to be no motivation to complete it whatsoever, here’s what you need to do: find your good reasons.

Even when you set goals, there needs to be reasons behind these goals. They may not be obvious, but stay at it until you see some, as this will bring your motivation back and will help you finish the task.

Some ideas for what a good reason can be:

  • A material reward – quite often, you will get paid for doing something you normally don’t like doing at all.
  • Personal gain – you will learn something new or will perhaps improve yourself in a certain way.
  • A feeling of accomplishment – at least you’ll be able to walk away feeling great about finding the motivation and courage to complete such a tedious task.
  • A step closer to your bigger goal – even the biggest accomplishments in history have started small and relied on simple and far less pleasant tasks than you might be working on. Every task you complete brings you closer to the ultimate goal, and acknowledging this always feels good.

2. Make It Fun

When it comes to motivation, attitude is everything. Different people may have completely opposite feelings towards the same task: some will hate it, others will love it.

Why do you think this happens? It’s simple: some of us find ways to make any task interesting and fun to do!

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Take sports for example. Visiting your local gym daily for a half-an-hour workout session sounds rather boring to some. Yet many others love the idea!

They like exercising not only because they recognize the good reasons behind it, but simply because it’s fun! At certain time of their daily schedule, they find going to gym to be the best thing to do, simply because nothing else will fit their time and lifestyle so perfectly.

Depending on how you look at it, you can have fun doing just about anything! Just look for ways of having fun, and you’ll find them!

A simple approach is to start working on any task by asking yourself a few questions:

  • How can I enjoy this task?
  • What can I do to make this task fun for myself and possibly for others?
  • How can I make this work the best part of my day?

As long as you learn to have the definite expectation of any task being potentially enjoyable, you will start to feel motivated.

Some of you will probably think of a thing or two which are valid exceptions from this statement, like something you always hate doing no matter how hard you try making it fun. You’re probably right, and that’s why I don’t claim everything to be fun.

However, most tasks have a great potential of being enjoyable, and so looking for ways to have fun while working is definitely a good habit to acquire.

3. Change Your Approach And Don’t Give Up

When something doesn’t feel right, it’s always a good time to take a moment and look for a different approach for the task.

You may be doing everything correctly and most efficiently, but such approach isn’t necessarily the most motivating one. Quite often, you can find a number of obvious tweaks to your current approach which will both change your experience and open up new possibilities.

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That’s why saying “one way or another” is so common — if you really want to accomplish your goal, there is always a way; and most likely, there’s more than one way.

If a certain approach doesn’t work for you, find another one, and keep trying until you find the one which will both keep you motivated and get you the desired results.

Some people think that trying a different approach means giving up. They take pride in being really stubborn and refusing to try any other options on their way towards the goal.

My opinion on this is that the power of focus is great, but you should be focusing on your goal, and not limiting your options by focusing on just one way to accomplish it it.

4. Recognize Your Progress

Everything you may be working on can be easily split into smaller parts and stages. For most goals, it is quite natural to split the process of accomplishing them into smaller tasks and milestones. There are a few reasons behind doing this, and one of them is tracking your progress.

We track our progress automatically with most activities. But to stay motivated, you need to recognize your progress, not merely track it.

Here’s how tracking and recognizing your progress is different:

Tracking is merely taking a note of having reached a certain stage in your process. Recognizing is taking time to look at a bigger picture and realize where exactly you are, and how much more you have left to do.

For example, if you’re going to read a book, always start by going through the contents table. Getting familiar with chapter titles and memorizing their total number will make it easier for you to recognize your progress as you read. Confirming how many pages your book has before starting it is also a good idea.

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You see, reading any book you will be automatically looking at page numbers and chapter titles, but without knowing the total number of pages, this information will have little meaning.

Somehow, it is human nature to always want things to happen in short term or even at once. Even though we split complex tasks into simpler actions, we don’t quite feel the satisfaction until all is done and the task is fully complete.

For many scenarios though, the task is so vast that such approach will drain all the motivation out of you long before you have a chance to reach your goal. That’s why it is important to always take small steps and recognize the positive different and progress made. This is how your motivation can sustain in long term.

5. Reward Yourself

This is a trick everyone likes: rewarding yourself is always pleasant. This is also one of the easiest and at the same time most powerful ways to stay motivated!

Feeling down about doing something? Dread the idea of working on some task? Hate the whole idea of working? You’re not alone.

Right from the beginning, agree on some deliverables which will justify yourself getting rewarded. As soon as you get one of the agreed results, take time to reward yourself in some way.

For some tasks, just taking a break and relaxing for a few minutes will do.

For others, you may want to get a fresh cup of coffee and even treat yourself a dessert.

For even bigger and more demanding tasks, reward yourself by doing something even more enjoyable, like going to a cinema or taking a trip to some place nice, or even buying yourself something.

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Your progress may not seem to others like anything worth celebrating but, take time and do it anyway! It is your task and your reward, so any ways to stay motivated are good.

The more you reward yourself for the honestly made progress, the more motivated you will feel about reaching new milestones, thus finally accomplishing your goal.

Mix and Match

Now that you have these five ways of staying motivated, it is a good moment to give you the key to them all: mix and match!

Pick one of the techniques and apply it to your situation. If it doesn’t work, or if you simply want to get more motivated, try another technique right way. Mix different approaches and match them to your task for the best results.

Just think about it: Finding good reasons to work on your task is bound to helping you feel better; and identifying ways to make it fun will help you enjoy the task even more.

Or, if you plan a few points for easier tracking of your progress and on top of that, agree on rewarding yourself as you go; this will make you feel most motivated about anything you have to work through.

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Featured photo credit: Lucas Lenzi via unsplash.com

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