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10 Signs You Will be Highly Successful and You Simply Don’t Realize It

10 Signs You Will be Highly Successful and You Simply Don’t Realize It
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We look up to powerful and successful people, but the ones that get the most respect are the rags to riches stories or those who started out like ordinary people and relied on their own wits to attain success. Some of these people didn’t even realize how much potential they had, and they didn’t really care – they just worked hard, and kept working hard day in and day out.

So, how do we know if we have some of the traits that can make us highly successful in life? You might be showing some of these positive signs of potential future success but simply aren’t aware of them yet.

1. You are punctual and dependable

It is difficult to find a person that keeps his or word every time and is never late to a meeting. Such people are held in high regard, both in the business world and among their friends.

If you are the kind of person who others find dependable, and are able to run a realistic schedule that allows you to be very punctual, then you have the potential to reach great heights.

2. You aren’t afraid to express yourself

Many people don’t feel comfortable showing their feelings to the world – revealing their true self to the world just makes them feel too vulnerable.

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However, if we look at some of the most successful and widely recognized modern artists, we see that they aren’t afraid to follow their vision, and they keep creatively expressing their inner self through their work. Film directors like Wes Anderson are considered auteurs because of their unique artistic style. In the same vein, the billionaire entrepreneurs of today have always been outspoken about their vision, even if it went against the grain.

3. You don’t expect others to do things for you

There are men and women out there who simply can’t get their act together, so they sit around waiting for the world to sort out their problems. They will call on their friends, family and even coworkers for support way too often, and they always complain about the myriad of trivial problems that keep them from reaching their goals.

On the other hand, truly successful people like to take things into their own hands, and they take responsibility for their own actions or inaction.

4. You keep your things well organized

Whenever you hear someone with any level of success talk about how they thrive in chaos, they most likely just have a very unique way of organizing their files. There are those who work best when sitting in the middle of large stacks of paper or looking back and forth from their phone to their laptop screen, with over a dozen tabs open. However, if you look closer there is a method to their madness.

It doesn’t matter whether you are really anal and systematic about your work and like everything to be in the right place, or you like to let your thoughts fly freely and have your work spread out across the room – if you can easily find what you need and work efficiently, then you can consider yourself organized.

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5. You have a desire to improve

Not everyone has a lot of ambition. They might be held back by fears that they can’t effectively deal with; they might not be creative enough or they might be lazy and used to settling for less if it means they don’t have to work too hard.

Then there are those that have a burning desire to constantly improve, learn new things, pick up new skills and sacrifice some fun and enjoyment now, so that they can be happier in the future.

The latter group is the one that keeps improving year after year, getting things done one step at a time.

6. You don’t feel awkward about asking for advice

There is a funny cliché about men being too proud to ask for directions. It might be my free-spirited European upbringing talking here, but anyone who is lost and clueless, yet thinks that asking for help is a sign of weakness, is a complete moron.

I understand that there are some fairly frail egos, but those who aren’t afraid to ask for help and advice will overcome obstacles much quicker, gain plenty of useful insight, and will be able to apply what they have learned in the future. A false sense of pride will ensure that you never make any serious progress.

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7. You are assertive and confident

You may not think much about your generally positive attitude towards life, or the fact that you are fairly pleased with yourself and your current situation, but believe me, confidence is a real game changer.

All it takes to stay motivated and focus on your goals is to believe in yourself. If you don’t downplay your capabilities, don’t let others push you around and aren’t afraid to speak up or pounce when a good opportunity presents itself, then you have what it takes to become fairly successful.

8. You see failure as a teaching tool and source of motivation

The problem most people fall into is that they allow themselves to be easily defeated. Of course, we all screw up from time to time, and even fail miserably when attempting new things, but that’s no reason to start shouting obscenities while waving your fist at the sky and then give up all hope.

Those who use failure to fuel their desire to become better, and manage to learn from all the mistakes they make along the way, these are the people who go on to achieve greatness.

9. You can stay calm and logical during stressful situations

Have you ever felt that others have a tendency to get a little too heated up about small things? Do you have trouble understanding how some people can allow themselves to go red in the face and start taking everything personally? Well, then you are one of the few people who can manage to keep their emotions in check during serious discussions, emergencies and other stressful situations.

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10. You look out for your people

The traits that often get associated with alpha personalities, i.e. natural leaders, are confidence and fearlessness, but people often forget about the most important alpha character trait – empathy.

Yes, you heard that right. If someone is to be a good leader they need to be able to provide for the group, to make sure that everyone gets what they need to feel safe and contempt.

It requires compromise, communications skills, quick thinking and some tough decisions, but a leader always tries to keep his people reasonably happy. If you only look out for yourself, you won’t get too far, or you’ll fall as quickly as you have risen.

If you are showing some of these signs, you might very well have a few dormant talents that will allow you to reach some of your biggest goals, if you can learn to harness their power. It will still take plenty of time and work, probably even some luck, but you definitely have an upper hand if you are already exhibiting some positive traits.

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Ivan Dimitrijevic

Ivan is the CEO and founder of a digital marketing company. He has years of experiences in team management, entrepreneurship and productivity.

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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