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10 Reasons Why People Give up Learning Musical Instruments Too Easily

10 Reasons Why People Give up Learning Musical Instruments Too Easily

I was lucky. I was able to learn the piano and organ as a child and teenager. Sixty years on, I still manage to play. But I know loads of people who start to learn to play a musical instrument and give up far too quickly and easily. The main reason seems to be that they have little idea of what is actually involved, the commitment it takes and, above all, their expectations are far too high. The result is that they blame themselves and wonder what went wrong. Whether they are learning woodwind, strings or keyboard instruments, the reasons why people give up are remarkably similar. Here are the top 10 reasons.

1. You are diligent but do not make the progress you expected, so you give up

If you are an adult, there are certain things you should keep in mind. First, diligence is just not enough. Perhaps you are not making the progress you would like because you are not taking advantage of your own learning experiences and the ways you always solve problems. In this respect, you have an enormous advantage over a child learner. An adult can apply memory techniques and logic to learning about notation and scales. By using these more, you can make more progress, as recommended in an article by K. Roulston in The International Journal of Music Education.

2. You practice a lot but are afraid of making too many mistakes, so you give up

Adults are self conscious and they are also keenly aware that their faculties are not what they once were. They think they have poorer co-ordination of fingers, arms and lips plus a lower level of sensory awareness and hearing difficulties. There is no denying that adults are facing a greater challenge, but the real problem seems that they are far too self conscious about making mistakes. If they were more relaxed about this, they would make much faster progress. Being more childlike in this can be a great help because the fear of failure or embarrassment is no big deal for them.

3. You like your teacher, but she is not encouraging you enough, so you give up

‘Great teachers do not exist, there are only great pupils.’ – Arthur Rubenstein

If you are not getting enough moral support, find another teacher. I had a change of piano teacher for the worst when I was seventeen. I did not like her at all and longed for my old teacher. The result was that I never practiced. Things came to a head when she told me I had not studied enough and that I could not do the exam. I stormed out and banged the door. There was a severe ticking off a week later, but it was a turning point for me. I began to practice and passed the exam with a decent grade. I was very proud of that and went on to study the organ.

Here is what you should do. If you find that your teacher is not encouraging you enough and giving you confidence, then you could have a word with her. You need more compassion and support. In an adult music students’ forum, the teachers usually ask “Why can’t adults learn?” The answer is of course, “Why can’t teachers teach adults?” It is a two way street and you have to find the right balance between getting enough encouragement with a teaching style that suits your learning mode.

In regards to praise, just bear in mind that Vladimir Horowitz, the great Russian pianist, got very faint praise when he played in New York in 1928. Critics described him as a “virtuoso, but musically underdeveloped.”

4. You are applying too much theory which is getting you nowhere, so you give up

Lots of adult learners would love to learn the violin, tuba or French horn by reading it all in a book. They are not prepared for the whole kinesthetic process where touch, control of the body and physical sensations are the keys to learning any musical instrument. Children can do this much more easily as learning in the early years is a physical process. Adults have forgotten this and replaced everything with words, logic and reasoning. A good teacher will help the adult become more aware of the physical sensations and the sounds they are producing. This will work for any instrument such as the violin or the guitar, but it may be more difficult with the piano because of its bulk.

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If you are intimidated by child prodigies, just forget the fact that Arturo Michelangeli Benedetti, the controversial and gifted Italian pianist, graduated from the Milan Conservatory at the age of thirteen!

5. You practice once a week but cannot see any improvement, so you give up

Maybe you think once a week is enough? If so, you should be aiming at several times a week. There is no short cut to learning a piece properly. It just takes hours of practice. The best way around this is to set aside a time for practice every one or two days and stick to it.

6. You perform your first pieces, but you get no great praise from your friends, so you give up

Look at what Joshua Bell, the world famous violinist, did at a metro station in Washington. He decided to be a busker. He wanted to see if people would really listen to his music in a rather busy setting. Well, they didn’t. Of the 1,097 people who passed by, only 7 actually stopped to listen. So, do not be discouraged, just keep practicing. You might remind your friends that learning a musical instrument takes people years so they should perhaps be more appreciative.

7. You want to perform really well, but you practice superficially, so you give up

Your expectations need to be lowered and you need to be more concentrated when you practice. It is as simple as that. Look at what the great musicians had to do to be successful, so take a leaf out of their book. I know that Maurizio Pollini, the extremely talented pianist, withdrew from performing for 6 years because he felt he needed to develop artistically!

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Intense practice and study really pays off. A world famous harpsichordist, Enrico Baiano, has told me that when he studies a piece really well, he finds that he has to do very little revision when he has to play it again, even if it is years later. As a music teacher himself, he also recommends that his students work with intelligence and concentration.

 “Practicing comes and goes. There are nights I can’t do anything right, but at other times it’s incredible. I play something that sounds decent and it makes my whole day. It colors my whole world when I practice well.”- Barbara Klain (violist)

8. You have not analysed your own technique enough and feel dissatisfied, so you give up

When musicians find that they cannot perform a piece to their satisfaction, they start to analyse their own technique. They see it as a problem solving exercise. This may mean slowing down and taking it to pieces. It may be a question of fingering, breath control or bowing technique. Then they will drill it unmercifully and gradually add the repaired bit to the whole piece, thus restoring it to its rightful glory. Older musicians have to be more aware of fatigue and stamina issues and may have to build in more breaks. Discover what works best for you and stick to it. Routine always helps.

9. You practice a lot but do not use the time efficiently, so you give up

We have talked above about how much you need to practice but what about how you organize it? Here is what the experts recommend.

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Just as with gym, you have to warm up. Don’t start straightaway on the hard stuff. Play something easy and which is also fun. You want to be fairly relaxed and comfortable. The warm up should last about 5 minutes. Then get down to the really difficult bit while you are still fresh and alert. You should be able to play this section a few times without any mistakes if you are to cross it off as actually learned. You can practice scales too, but try to make them interesting by building in good tone and some rhythm. It makes it more enjoyable and you are also experimenting. Then finish off with fun stuff or you could try some sight reading if you are not too tired.

10. Your motivation sinks after a while, so you give up

How can you stay motivated? Remember your first enthusiasm when you started out on this adventure? There is a sense of magic about approaching music and the desire to be a protagonist in this wonderful experience, not just a mere listener. You know there is an element of risk and this is where the teacher has an essential role in encouraging you in being compassionate and considerate.

Set yourself reasonable goals and divide these into mini goals so that you can measure your progress in a more concrete way. As you discover more and more about music, listen to some great musicians and read extensively about composers and concert artists and the struggles they too had.

Keep a few inspirational quotes in your music case or on top of your keyboard. Remind yourself that you are in it for the long haul and that you will not be performing at Carnegie Hall in a few years!

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Featured photo credit: Wounded Soldiers learn to play musical instruments as part of their therapy/ Army Medicine via flickr.com

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Robert Locke

Author of Ziger the Tiger Stories, a health enthusiast specializing in relationships, life improvement and mental health.

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Last Updated on February 21, 2019

7 Natural Memory Boosters That Actually Work for All Ages

7 Natural Memory Boosters That Actually Work for All Ages

Forgot a name? Misplaced your keys? Taking longer to find the right words? Don’t panic. There’s plenty you can do to improve your memory.

You’re probably expecting us to reveal 7 little known and newly discovered herbs from the forests of the Amazon, the peaks of the Himalayas and the Arctic tundra. No such luck.

Despite Americans spending hundreds of millions of dollars a year on Ginkgo Biloba, Ashwagandha, Periwinkle, Bacopa, Vitamin B’s, Omega 3’s and memory boosting supplement cocktails, there is very little scientific evidence they actually work. [1]

Instead, we’re going to offer you 7 completely natural memory boosters, backed up by scientific research. It may take a little more effort than a magic memory pill, but the benefits will transcend your memory and improve your overall quality of life as well, making you more fit, energetic, happy and sharp.

How Do We Remember?

The first process in remembering is creating a memory.

This is where our brain sends a signal, associated with a thought, event or piece of information our mind is processing, over our brains neural pathways, called synapses.

Think of our neural pathways like roads and information like trucks. The better the roads, the more trucks can be driven.

The second step in remembering is memory consolidation.

Consolidation is when the brain takes that thought, event or piece of information and actually stores it in the brain. So now we’re talking about taking delivery of the trucks and storing its contents in the warehouse.

Consolidation helps us store information and label it properly, so its organized and easy to retrieve when needed.

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The last step is memory retrieval.

That’s the step whereby we try to retrieve the information stored in our brains. You know when you have the name of someone on the tip of your tongue.

You have the information; it’s been stored, but you just can’t find it. Our memory recall is typically better the stronger the memory is and the more often we’ve used it.

Memory decline is a normal part of aging. However, new scientific research is discovering many new ways for us to improve memory creation, consolidation and retrieval–no matter our age.

7 Natural Memory Boosters

So how to work on memory and boost your brain power? Here’re 7 brain boosters backed by science that you should try:

1. Aerobic Exercise

Aerobic activity is about as close as we get to a magic pill for our memories. Exercise helps your brain create new capillaries and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) which creates new brain cells and connections. To put it in plain english, aerobic activity changes our brains and helps it grow.

Studies have shown that exercising increases the size of the hippocampus and improves memory. In fact, even if you start exercising as an older adult, you can reverse cognitive decline by 1 to 2 years and protects against further decreases in the size of the hippocampus, which is essential for memory. [2]

In another study, reviewed by Dr. Ian Robertson of the University of Dublin, they looked at a group of people of 60 years and older, who engaged in “active walking” for four months.

They compared them with another group of people who only stretched over the same period of time. After testing both groups before and after the 4 month period, the walkers improved their memory and attention considerably more than the stretching group.

So which exercises are best and how much do we have to exercise?

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Turns out, it doesn’t really matter whether you run, swim, row or bike. What does matter is that you push yourself beyond your current abilities, keep doing more, keep getting better. Set yourself short term goals and keep pushing the goal posts.

2. Sleep

You need your sleep. The deeper the better. Sleep helps improve your procedural memory (how to do things, like how do I navigate my iPhone) and declarative memory (facts, like what’s my password). [3]

Even short naps from 6 to 45 minutes have been shown to improve your memory. In one Harvard study, college students memorized pairs of unrelated words, memorized a maze and copied a complex form. All were tested on their work. Half were then allowed to take a 45 minute nap. They were then retested. Those who took a nap, got a boost in their performance. [4]

Another study showed that getting REM (deep) sleep can increase your memory and mental performance by 33% to 73%. Getting a deep sleep helps the brain consolidate memories through dreams and “associative processing”. However, the study also revealed that heart rate variability in deep sleep also contributed significantly to increased memory performance. [5]

3. MIND Diet

Healthy eating, particularly more dark colored fruit, vegetables and oily fish has been shown to improve memory and stave off cognitive decline.

The MIND diet is proven to reduce the risk of dementia. It’s a mix of the popular Mediterranean diet and the low blood pressure DASH diet. [6]

The study kept track of the diets of almost 1,000 older adults. They were followed for an average of 4½ years.

The study concluded that “people whose diets were most strongly in line with the MIND diet had brains that functioned as if they were 7½ years younger than those whose diets least resembled this eating style.”

The study also showed that people who followed the MIND diet in the study reduced their chance of getting Alzheimer’s disease in half.

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So what does the MIND diet consist of? Lots of vegetables, leafy greens, nuts, berries, beans, fish, poultry, olive oil, whole grains and wine.

4. Relax

We all know that stress is bad for our health. It can raise our blood pressure, impact our immune system and interrupt our sleep. Stress also impairs our memory.

When our body gets stressed, it releases cortisol into our blood stream, which can cause short and long term physical changes to the brain. While cortisol has sometimes been shown to cause increases in short term memory, it can actually decrease our long term recall memory.

To help reduce the stress in your life, try relaxing with meditation, yoga or breathing exercises. Unplug–even for just a few hours. Stop checking your emails, social accounts and news. Release some endorphins with some exercise.

Bottom line, the more anxious and stressed we are, the less clearly we think, the poorer our memory works.

5. Continuous Learning

The mind is like a muscle. The more you challenge it, the stronger it gets. The more you learn, the more you can learn.

Research shows that learning can actually change the physical makeup of your brain. Not too long ago, we used to think that you were born with a fixed amount of brain cells, which declined with age. New research now shows that we can actually increase the number of brain cells we have throughout our life.

Aside from staying physically active, learning new skills and studying can actually keep our brains healthier. Consider taking a continuing education class, studying a new language, learning a new instrument, playing new card games. [7]

Studies show that the more complex the task, the more benefits for your mind. Simply showing up to class is not enough. You need to be actively engaged. Anything that forces you to focus and learn something new and get out of a rote routine will help you sharpen your mind and boost your memory.

6. Stay Social

The more deep and meaningful social connections you maintain, the more you protect your brain. Bottom line, the more friends you have, the more people you work with, the more you’re forced to use your brain.

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Social isolation and loneliness are significant risks of dementia. Without interacting with others, our brains wilt. Isolation and loneliness lead to depression, physical and mental decline. [8]

In a 2016 study published in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, seniors with a full social calendar did better on memory, reasoning, and processing speed tests. [9]

What to do?

Party! Seriously, get together with friends as often as possible. Have family dinners. Choose social activities or sports like tennis, golf, cards or go for walks with a friend. Bottom line have fun, build meaningful social relationships and stay connected. Not only will it make your mind sharper and your memory better, you’ll be happier, too!

7. Wakeful Rest

This one is getting harder and harder to do. In a world where we can’t sit on a bus, go up an elevator or go to the bathroom without our phones, doing absolutely nothing to distract our minds is becoming increasingly difficult.

But, the results are in. Doing nothing is great for your memory. Quietly resting for 10 minutes, after you learn something will help you remember and help you create more detailed memories. [10]

What we do minutes after we learn something new has a significant impact on how well we retain the new information. In another study, it didn’t matter what you did after you learned something new, as long as you weren’t distracted by outside factors. In other words, you could be thinking of your day, making a grocery list, or thinking of a story. In either case, wakeful rest for a period of 10 minutes helped the brain process and consolidate your memories so that you were better able to recall the information at a later date. [11]

Conclusion

You don’t have to spend a dime on cocktails and supplements promising a quick boost to your memory power. There is very little conclusive scientific evidence suggesting supplements will help improve the memories of healthy individuals–not for Ginkgo Biloba, Vitamin B, fish oils, Vitamin D, Folate or other supplements claiming they a secret formula.

There are far cheaper and more effective ways to boost your memory: exercise, rest, eat well, learn, love, laugh and relax. Who wouldn’t want that prescription?

More Resources About Boost Brain Power

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

Reference

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