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10 Health Benefits of Music That You Were Never Aware Of

10 Health Benefits of Music That You Were Never Aware Of

Can you imagine a civilization without music? Impossible, I would say. In addition, history shows that every culture on this planet has used music in its religion, meditation, medicine, rituals and enjoyment of life. Let us look at the actual health benefits now.

1. Music is good for your heart.

“There’s just something about music—particularly live music—that excites and activates the body.”

—Joanne Loewy, Editor, Music and Medicine.

They say that music is good for the soul, but what about the heart? There are lots of experiments which are more or less impressive on the benefits of music when treating illness.

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Heart patients were observed at Massachusetts General Hospital. They were recovering from heart surgery. Some patients listened to Mozart’s piano sonatas for half an hour every day. These patients were the ones who had improved heart rates and lower blood pressure compared with those who never listened to any music at all.

2. We are musical creatures.

A must-read book on the power of music is Musicophilia by Dr. Oliver Sacks. He tells us that music and its powerful rhythms and sounds occupy more space in our brain than language does! As a neurologist, he has researched and studied extensively the role of music in our lives.

On his website, Dr. Sacks explains that when he meets people who are aphasic (have lost the power of speech), he always sings “Happy Birthday” to them. It is a starting point for treatment as many aphasic patients can still sing.

3. Music can help with pain relief.

Patients suffering from unrelenting pain have found relief from listening to music. Classical music seems to be the best option and Mozart and Bach are the most suitable. Also music for meditation can help but heavy metal and other techno sounds can actually agitate patients and cause irregular heartbeats, so they are not recommended.

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4. Music may be useful in controlling obesity.

Subliminal music which sends messages to the subconscious may work in helping people with weight control. It may act on the working memory so the messages about which foods to avoid will be repeated more effectively.

Other studies show that simply playing soft and relaxing music while eating can have a controlling effect on how full you feel. The result is that you will eat less.

5. Music can strengthen your immune system.

The Community Music School at the Michigan State University lists many health benefits of music therapy. One of the more interesting studies done hows that the interleukin-1 levels, which are key boosters for our immune system, can benefit from exposure to music. Even a quarter of an hour of music was effective. This is mentioned in the book, The Rebirth of Music.

6. Music helps premature babies.

The Beth Israel Medical Center treated over 250 premature babies with a special type of musical therapy. They chose music which resembled the sounds of the mother’s womb. These ranged from percussion instruments to lullabies. The music therapists chose the music carefully to suit the babies’ heartbeats and breathing patterns. The results were surprising in that the babies were quieter, slept better and were generally less stressed, as well as their parents!

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7. Music may help with memory and learning.

There was a lot of publicity about the “Mozart Effect” which showed that a group of college students did better at math while they were listening to some classical music. Some students find that music can aid concentration, while others need silence.

8. Playing a musical instrument can help with motor skills.

Many patients who have suffered brain damage after a stroke have gained benefits by learning to play a musical instrument. It can help with impulse control and social interaction. Stroke patients also benefit greatly when they have to learn lyrics and melody.

9. Music can help the elderly.

Elderly people often suffer from loneliness and depression, especially when they end up in nursing homes. Music has helped Alzheimer’s patients to actually focus on reality, albeit for short periods. It also makes them less agitated. Researchers have also noted that those senior citizens who still play an instrument are much fitter physically and emotionally than those who have never played.

10. Music may help you feel less sad.

For those people who feel down, there is a therapeutic benefit in listening to music. It does not have to be joyful or jolly either! Researchers at the University of Kent found that the selection of SSIM (Self-Identified Sad Music) by sad people was not necessarily linked to improving their mood. As long as it was beautiful, it would help them.

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Now the next time you listen to music to keep you motivated at the gym or to relax, help you sleep or help with stress, just thank your lucky stars that you have free therapy. There are no negative side effects either!

Featured photo credit: Artsedge Kennedy Centre via artsedge.kennedy-center.org

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Robert Locke

Author of Ziger the Tiger Stories, a health enthusiast specializing in relationships, life improvement and mental health.

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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