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10 Reasons Why Crazy People Are More Likely To Be Successful

10 Reasons Why Crazy People Are More Likely To Be Successful
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Let me start by saying that success is not normal, it is unusual and in fact insane.  Normal hardworking people very rarely become successful.

Normal people work very hard at their jobs to barely make ends meet. Normal people take out high interest loans they can’t afford to get degrees they probably won’t use. Normal people buy cookie cutter cars and live in cookie cutter houses so they can enslave themselves to the perceptions of people they don’t like.

In a world fascinated with conformity, mediocrity is sanity. People are unfortunately content living up to the status quo – go to school, get a good job, get married, buy a house and have kids.

When you consider this quote by Steve Jobs, you realize that being crazy is not just about thinking outside the box, it is creating the box that normal people will think inside of.

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“Here’s to the crazy ones, the misfits, the rebels, the troublemakers, the round pegs in the square holes… the ones who see things differently — they’re not fond of rules… You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them, but the only thing you can’t do is ignore them because they change things… they push the human race forward, and while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius, because the ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do.”

Steve Jobs

Here are ten reasons why crazy people are more likely to be successful

1. They create new boxes for normal people to think inside of

Crazy people like Steve Jobs don’t just challenge the norm: they create new norms for others to either challenge or think inside of. Innovation doesn’t always mean coming up with something new. Most times, it is as “crazy” and mind blowing as making something that already exist better. By thinking differently, crazy people like kids use the power of their imagination to power their way to success.

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2. They are too foolish to be scared.

When crazy people set goals for themselves, they aren’t concerned with the “what if” possibility of failure. For them, there is no plan “B” because plan “A” will absolutely work. While normal people are paralyzed by the fear of failure, the crazy ones saddle up and ride anyways. To them, failure is a word with no meaning. This ability to seemingly disregard the fear of failure is why the crazy ones are more likely to succeed.

“Fear is not real. The only place that fear can exist is in our thoughts of the future. It is a product of our imagination, causing us to fear things that do not at present and may not ever exist. That is near insanity. Do not misunderstand me danger is very real but fear is a choice.”

Will Smith

3. They strive for authenticity

The need to be authentic is the need to be different from everybody else. Crazy people develop their own sense of style and paint the portrait of life exactly the way they see it. This ability to be original has seen many crazies achieve success by developing life skills that normal people would call a bad habit or simply absurd. For example, Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg are known to wear the same type of outfit every day. Billionaire Warren Buffett collects an annual salary of $100,000 dollars and has pledged 99% of his wealth to charity.

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“Develop your own style and wear it long enough to become a trendsetter” – Anonymous

4. They have high energy

Normal people can’t wait to do nothing. They can’t wait to get off work, go home, sit in front of the TV and do nothing. They always complain about how much energy they don’t have and how much more time they wish they had. Crazies however have all the time, passion and energy in the world. They dedicate themselves to a craft and work tirelessly to develop their skills. This intent focus and energy definitely gives them an advantage for success.

5. They dare to break the rules.

Deviating from the norm isn’t always easy, especially if you have spent your whole life following rules. However, crazies understand that while rules are important, they can be limiting. What rules in your industry do you accept as fact? Why do you follow them? If the answer is “that’s the way it has always been” then you are normal and probably will never succeed. It is this ability to question authority without disrespect that makes the crazies more likely to be successful.

6. They invent out of necessity

To other people, crazies may seem like highly resourceful people, which is true. But a deeper truth is that they are just people who take action to solve a problem they can no longer ignore. Their unusual minds help them view the world from a different perspective than normal people. So problems that normal people would just accept as “the way things are,” crazy people cannot accept.  Crazies embody the old adage, “necessity is the mother of all inventions.”

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7. They recognize other crazies.

No matter what type of person you are, it is easy to recognize others of like mind. Crazies all over the world have begun a revolution to find other crazies. They almost seem to be drawn to inventions, ideas and other individuals born a little crazy. They see genius in what normal people have written off as abnormal and are often the early adopters of all the great new trends and technologies. The idea of being able to brainstorm with others who think as differently as you do gives you a greater chance of success. Crazy’s challenge one another’s beliefs.

8. They are always curious

Crazies have the minds of kids, constantly asking why. Their minds are insatiable and they are not afraid to follow the rabbit hole no matter how deep down it goes. This allows them to see life as not full of problems, but full of wonder and potential. This ability to always see the glass half full makes the crazies more likely to succeed.

9. They are like a dog with a bone

Once crazies sink their teeth into something, they never let go. Crazy people become obsessed with certain problems and how to solve them. They become so engrossed that no matter how impossible a task supposedly is, they will always find a way. This is the X factor that will drive a crazy person to succeed at a task that a normal person would have long ago given up in frustration.

10. They don’t label.

Crazies don’t label people or problems; they are only intrigued by what’s inside a person.  While normal people see defined lines and segregate people into labels of race, religion, gender, career specialization or sexual orientation, crazies only see heart and passion. To the crazies, there is no black or white, just shades of grey. By not labelling others, crazies are able to surround themselves with an extremely diverse group of talent and unlock the human potential and ability for action.

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Featured photo credit: http://itnews.iplabbd.com/improve-your-presentation-skill-steve-jobs-technique/ via itnews.iplabbd.com

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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