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How to Save Money on Your Monthly Phone Bill

How to Save Money on Your Monthly Phone Bill

Families in the United States squander around one hundred and thirty nine dollars each month on cellular phones according to J.D. Power and Associates. This is above the one hundred and twenty seven monthly in the year 2009. And based on the reports of the Bureau of Labor Statistics in 2011 household spending on cell phone services shot up by above 4.5% and since the year 2006 has increased over 20%. While there are methods to get free home phone using Google’s GV service as I talked about on this post on CorVoIP website, we are mostly talking about cellular phones.

Avoid Wireless Charges You Don’t Use

Todd Dunphy used to work closely with Verizon and he helped develop the mobile phone analytics organization called Validas. Todd has partnered with ABC News “Real Money” team in an attempt to do away with “wireless waste”, which is data, minutes, and texts that haven’t been put to use. Validas is a business that executes evaluations of cell phone utilization for big organizations, and they just lately released Savelovegive (SLG) the very same service for no cost at all to consumers. Its creators plan for the website to turn that “wireless waste” into something useful although the service is free, inviting people to pledge a small amount of their savings to charity. The company doesn’t take a cut from users’ donations. Even if you do not want to take your phone with you in case your CDMA does not work abroad, you could get same apps on your laptop through the infamous hack of emulation.

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“So you have your savings linked to a foundation for the empowerment of women we built in microphilanthropy inside the app”, according to Dunphy. You can take a bit of that savings and redirect it. Or you can preserve it all for yourself, it’s no big issue. But we developed a vehicle.

Validas claimed that when it comes to monthly mobile phone bills 80% of the American population overspend by about $200 every year. As soon as Dunphy looked over the bill of Barry at SLG, he figured out ways to save much more than that almost instantly.

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Though SLG automatically prepares an email that customers may send to their carriers to switch plans, Barry went into an AT&T retailer to switch his plan face-to-face. Because Barry changed his plan to a MobileShare with 6GB of data monthly and adding a corporate discount he’ll go on to save about $1,400 within the year.

Pro Tips to Save Your Cell Phone Bill

If you are ready to lessen your bill and make sure you have a cellphone that fits you perfectly check out some of Dunphy’s effective tips below.

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1. Let free sites figure it out on your behalf—just plug in your cellular phone number. At SLG, you log in with your carrier account information, giving the site access to your previous bills. By taking a look at usage and charges the website analyzes the bills. Once the analysis is complete it will compare your plan to other plans on hand and give you ways to switch up the plan you currently have and save. At the moment customers of AT&T and Verizon are who SLG works for, but the website expects to expand to other carriers soon. Another analysis site is Billshrink. When it came to Barry he was only utilizing 2.5 gigabytes of data each month, but he was purchasing a total of 8. By bundling talking and texting into one new plan, he could save nearly $1,200 a year. You can also check out VoIP plans to use when you are at home or even there are VoIP plans for small businesses.

2. Look for sneaky charges like horoscope texts, roadside assistance and 411.
Very small charges can be added onto your bill without your knowledge. According to research done by the Citizens Utility Board and Validas it’s over five dollars each month on average. If you notice a charge doesn’t look right call your carrier immediately to get them to get rid of it.

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3. Obtain your discount.
In order to get their employees discounts many companies work with mobile phone carriers. It’s not merely for corporate workers – teachers, government workers and even students can qualify. But the key is that you must ask for it, entering your company email on the carrier’s discount site. Examine the discount pages at AT&T, Verizon and Sprint. Barry will qualify for a discount of upwards of twenty five percent since his employer was just bought by IBM – check yours here. The discount may save him yet another $200 yearly. Dunphy told ABC News that Barry’s situation was standard.
A good deal of it is awareness, he explained. Awareness of what’s out there and then also figuring out what you use and what’s out there. It’s like going and acquiring a suit or a dress, getting it perfectly customized to you.

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Mukesh Agarwal

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Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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