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Freelancers And Consultants: 3 Reasons You Shouldn’t be Billing Hourly

Freelancers And Consultants: 3 Reasons You Shouldn’t be Billing Hourly

Imagine a method of paying for a time-sensitive service whereby the slower the service provider is, the more they’re paid; and by contrast, the faster they are the less they earn.

One bizarre consequence of this arrangement is that the more experienced professionals in a given field, whose experience typically makes them faster than newcomers to the profession, will be treated as less valuable than the inexperienced practitioners who usually take longer to complete the same amount of (often inferior) work.

And consider also that this payment method means not only that the service provider has incentive to drag out his work as long as possible, but also that the client paying for the final product has incentive to rush the work.

Insane, right?

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And yet this is how tens of millions of service providers, consultants and other freelancers charge their clients. Hourly billing. What on earth are we thinking?

For the same reason the “Print Screen” key persists on desktop keyboards years after its real estate should have gone to, say, a “.com” key, consultants in just about every profession continue to bill by the hour. Because we always have.

If you’re a consultant, freelance contractor or the sole proprietor of a service business, there will of course be times when a client insists on paying you by the hour. (That simply means the client hasn’t given enough thought to this arrangement, either, because it works against their interests as much as against yours.) In those cases, what can you do?

But if you’re given the choice, or asked to define your preferred method of billing, here are 3 reasons you should not opt to charge by the hour:

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1)  It creates an adversarial relationship between you and your client — when such conflict is totally unnecessary and another billing arrangement would better benefit both sides.

Say you’re a graphic artist, and you and your client agree upfront that the new icon set you’re going to create for their website is worth $1,000 — for the first set, plus one round of revisions. (Tweaks beyond that are another matter, not important here.) You’re happy with that figure, and your client is as well.

Now that you’ve got that out of the way, you both have an incentive to arrive at an icon set everyone loves as soon as possible. The sooner it’s done, the sooner your client starts reaping the benefits of their new icons — on their website, in marketing collateral and in other branding channels. And the sooner it’s done, the more time you have for other paying projects — and the more “per hour” you’ve earned, if you want to think of it that way.

In other words, once the client has determined what the final work product is actually worth to them, the fact that you can bang out an excellent icon set in a hurry becomes a virtue for both parties. When you’re billing by the hour, by contrast, you have a perverse incentive not to finish your excellent first draft too quickly, because it means you’ll get paid less.

And this inherent conflict of interest carries through your entire relationship with your hourly-paying clients: If you demonstrate you can complete an icon set very quickly (and in fewer hours than the job’s compensation would be worth to you), you also have to worry you’re setting a precedent that the client should expect all of your design work to be completed fast — and not to have to pay you much for it.

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2)  It measures and rewards the wrong things (and neglects the right ones).

Let’s stick with our $1,000 icon set example. Imagine you’re billing hourly — say, $50 an hour — and you nail the icons on the first shot. Your client is thrilled with the work! You’re thrilled with the great feedback you’ve gotten. And because the job took you 20 hours, you can bill them $1,000. Not bad!

Now a different scenario: Your first draft falls flat. The client calls you frustrated and a bit panicked. After an unpleasant conversation, you crank out a second draft and, after you send in the new icons a couple of days later, the client responds that they’re pleased. Not thrilled, but pleased. And because the two drafts took you a combined 31 hours, you can bill the client… $1,550?

But wait. In the first scenario, you nailed the work on the first try. And they loved it. Second scenario? Not so much. It took you two tries, you shook your client’s faith in you, and you didn’t turn in an approved draft for an extra couple of days. But they paid you 50% more!

In a perfect scenario — or at least one where the client pays you for your work based on criteria less arbitrary than the number of hours the job takes — you’d whip up a brilliant design ASAP and then get yourself back out there working on other billable projects. And your client would start reaping the benefits of your completed work sooner.

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But in this nonsensical hourly-billing arrangement, you and your client are actually both working counter to your own best interests. You are, because you’re spending more time than necessary on the project (or at least holding back on delivering until you’ve racked up a number of billable hours you can live with). Your client is as well, because they’re rushing you to hurry the work rather than take the time you need to make it outstanding.

All because you and your client are measuring the project’s worth based on the totally arbitrary “total hours worked” rather than what really matters.

3)  It creates a built-in mechanism to make your work less compensated as you gain more relevant knowledge and expertise for your client.

Imagine you’ve been working with your icon-set client for a few months now. You’re learning about their organization, products, vision, customers and competitors. In short, you’re becoming faster at understanding new projects and banging out great work. Doesn’t this mean you’re becoming more valuable to your client than you were on your first assignments for them?

And yet, if you’re billing them honestly, the fact that you’re becoming quicker at completing assignments — and turning in work that delights your client — means that your compensation from this client goes down the more the relevant knowledge and experience you gain for them goes up.

My advice: Bill by the project. Once you and your client agree on the ultimate worth of a given task or service, your interests become nicely aligned from that moment forward. And you can both get on with the business of generating the best work possible in the shortest time possible.

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robbie hyman

Copywriter

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Published on November 20, 2018

The Best Ways to Save Money Even Impulsive Spenders Can Get Behind

The Best Ways to Save Money Even Impulsive Spenders Can Get Behind

The truth is, there are many “money saving guides” online, but most don’t cover the root issue for not saving.

Once I’d discovered a few key factors that allowed me to save 10k in one year, I realized why most articles couldn’t help me. The problem is that even with the right strategies you can still fail to save money. You need to have the right systems in place and the right mindset.

In this guide, I’ll cover the best ways to save money — practical yet powerful steps you can take to start saving more. It won’t be easy but with hard work, I’m confident you’ll be able to save more money–even if you’re an impulsive spender.

Why Your Past Prevents You from Saving Money

Are you constantly thinking about your financial mistakes?

If so, these thoughts are holding you back from saving.

I get it, you wish you could go back in time to avoid your financial downfalls. But dwelling over your past will only rob you from your future. Instead, reflect on your mistakes and ask yourself what lessons you can learn from them.

It wasn’t easy for me to accept that I had accumulated thousands of dollars in credit card debt. Once I did, I started heading in the right direction. Embrace your past failures and use them as an opportunity to set new financial goals.

For example, after accepting that you’re thousands of dollars in debt create a plan to be debt free in a year or two. This way when you’ll be at peace even when you get negative thoughts about your finances. Now you can focus more time on saving and less on your past financial mistakes.

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How to Effortlessly Track Your Spending

Stop manually tracking your spending.

Leverage powerful analytic tools such as Personal Capital and these money management apps to do the work for you. This tool has worked for me and has kept me motivated to why I’m saving in the first place. Once you login to your Personal Capital dashboard, you’re able to view your net worth.

When I’d first signed up with Personal Capital, I had a negative net worth, but this motivated me to save more. With this tool, you can also view your spending patterns, expenses, and how much money you’re saving.

Use your net worth as your north star to saving more. Whenever you experience financial setbacks, view how far you’ve come along. Saving money is only half the battle, being consistent is the other half.

The Truth on Why You Keep Failing

Saving money isn’t sexy. If it was, wouldn’t everyone be doing it?

Some people are natural savers, but most are impulsive spenders. Instead of denying that you’re an impulsive spender, embrace it.

Don’t try to save 60 to 70% of your income if this means you’ll live a miserable life. Saving money isn’t a race but a marathon. You’re saving for retirement and for large purchases.

If you’re currently having a hard time saving, start spending more money on nice things. This may sound counterintuitive but hear me out. Wouldn’t it be better to save $200 each month for 12 months instead of $500 for 3 months?

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Most people run into trouble because they create budgets that set them up for failure. This system won’t work for those who are frugal, but chances are they don’t need help saving. This system is for those who can’t save money and need to be rewarded for their hard work.

Only because you’re buying nice things doesn’t mean that you’ll save less. Here are some rules you should have in place:

  1. Save more than 50% of your available money (after expenses)
  2. Only buy nice things after saving
  3. Automate your savings with automatic bank transfers

These are the same rules that helped me save thousands each year while buying the latest iPhone. Focus only on items that are important to you. Remember, you can afford anything but not everything.

How to Foolproof Yourself out of Debt

Personal finance is a game. On one end, you’re earning money; and on the to other, you’re saving. But what ends up counting in the end isn’t how much you earn but how much you save. Research shows that about 60% of Americans spend more than they save.[1]

So how can you separate yourself from the 60%?

By not accumulating more debt. This way you’ll have more money to save and avoid having more financial obligations. A great way to stop accumulating debt is using cash to pay for all your transactions.

This will be challenging, depending on how reliant you are with your credit card, but it’s worth the effort. Not only will you stop accruing debt, but you’ll also be more conscious with what you buy.

For example, you’ll think twice about purchasing a new $200 headphone despite having the cash to buy them. According to a poll conducted by The CreditCards.com, 5 out of 6 Americans are impulsive spenders.[2]

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Telling yourself that you’ll have the discipline to not buy things won’t cut it. This is equal to having junk food in your fridge while trying to eat healthy–it’s only a matter of time before you slip. By using cash to make your purchases, you’ll spend less and save more.

A Proven Formula to Skyrocket Your Savings

Having proven systems in place to help you save more is important, but they’re not the best way to save money.

You can search for dozens of ways to save money, but there’ll always be a limit. Instead of spending the majority of your effort saving, look for ways to increase your income. The truth is that once you have the right systems in place, saving is easy.

What’s challenging is earning more money. There are many routes you can take to achieve this. For example, you can work long and hard at your current job to earn a raise. But there’s one problem–you’re depending on someone else to give you a raise.

Your company will have to have the budget, and you’ll have to know how to toot your own horn to get this raise. This isn’t to say that earning a raise is impossible, but things are better when you’re in control right? That’s why building a side-hustle is the best way to increase your income.

Think of your side-hustle as a part-time job doing something you enjoy. You can sell items on eBay for a profit, or design websites for small businesses. Building a side-hustle will be on the hardest things you’ll do, be too stubborn to quit.

During the early stages, you won’t be making money and that’s okay. Since you already have a source of income, you won’t be dependent on your side-hustle to pay for your expenses. Depending on how much time you invest in your side-hustle, it can one day replace your current income.

Whatever route you take, focus more on earning and save as much as possible. You have more control than you give yourself credit for.

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Transform Yourself into a Saving Money Machine

Saving money isn’t complicated but it’s one of the hardest things you’ll do.

By learning from your mistakes and rewarding yourself after saving you’ll save more. What would you do with an extra $200 or $500 each month? To some, this is life-changing money that can improve the quality of their lives.

The truth is saving money is an art. Save too much and you’ll quit, but save too little and you’ll pay for the consequences in the future. Saving money takes effort and having the right systems in place.

Imagine if you’d started saving an extra $100 this next month? Or, saved $20K in one year? Although it’s hard to imagine, this can be your reality if you follow the principles covered in this guide.

Take a moment to brainstorm which goals you’d be able to reach if you had extra money each month. Use these goals as motivation to help you stay on track on your journey to saving more. If I was able to save thousands of dollars with little guidance, imagine what you’ll be able to do.

What are you waiting for? Go and start saving money, the sky is your limit.

Featured photo credit: rawpixel via unsplash.com

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