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7 Ways To Spend Money Wisely

7 Ways To Spend Money Wisely

Frugal living doesn’t have to be a life devoid of fun. In fact, you might be surprised how easy it is to trim your expenses with a little patience and planning. The more you can get out of every dollar you spend, the more money you will have to save for potential emergencies, a college education for your children, vacations to exotic locations, or whatever big ticket item your heart desires. To get you started, here are 7 ways to spend money wisely.

1. Pony up for quality where it counts.

The cheapest option isn’t always the best option. What’s the point of buying a cheap pair of shoes if they’re just going to become worn out and rugged within a few months? It would be cheaper to pay $50 for an outfit that will be in good shape next year than $20 for an outfit that has to be replaced in less than 6 months.

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2. Buy generic label groceries.

You would be hard-pressed to find any difference between name-brand and generic labels in the grocery store. Don’t believe me? Grab a bottle of a name-brand peanut butter and the generic grocery store variety and compare the ingredients. Repeat this exercise with things like canned vegetables, boxes of pasta, cleaning products, and medicine. When you purchase name-brands, you are not paying for the product itself, but rather the idea behind the product. In other words: name brands are more expensive because they have higher marketing budgets (not higher quality). 

3. Cut down on food waste.

Answer honestly: if you had to guess, what percentage of the groceries you buy end up uneaten and tossed in the trash? According to a study by the Natural Resources Defense Center, the average American family of four throws away almost 50% of the food they purchase, resulting in an annual loss up to $2,275. To avoid grocery waste, change your thinking about shopping. Instead of making a list of items to purchase without thought process, plan ahead by writing down a weekly schedule of the specific meals you are going to cook before you go to the store. If it isn’t required in the ingredients you need, it doesn’t go in your cart. Make note of how much food gets tossed in the trash and cut the amount you purchase accordingly. If you’d like to save time and money, check out this essential resource on once a month cooking.

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4. Wait for it…

Retail therapy is almost always a good idea, but smart shoppers know how to be patient. Why should you spend $100 on that gorgeous skirt now if it’s going to be marked down to make room for fall and winter clothes? Be patient and you will be rewarded with a steep price cut. Keep an eye out for the special offers that you can’t refuse.

5. Clip coupons for special occasions.

Dining out is one of my favorite date night activities, but it sure can empty a wallet fast. Restaurants are typically generous with their deals, so start clipping for serious cash savings. Wanna make coupon-clipping a fun and interesting game? Try this:

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  • Get an envelope and start collecting coupons
  • Decide on a weekly date night
  • Have a random drawing to determine where you go (it will always be a surprise!)

6. Go to the matinee.

Late night movies are so overrated. Why would you pay double the matinee ticket price just for the pleasure of combating a much larger crowd and struggling to find a seat in a packed auditorium? Go to the early show to save some dough and beat the crowd.

7. Hit up the thrift shop.

Consignment shops are full of deals on barely-used clothing that could save you tons of money on your wardrobe. If you have never considered thrift shopping because you’re afraid the quality won’t be up-to-par, give it a chance. The thrift shops in my neighborhood are quite picky about the items they accept, so I bet you just might be surprised.

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Do you have any additional tips that will help people save some dough? 

If you’re feeling cash-strapped, please don’t feel like you’re alone. I understand how you feel, and I’m willing to wager the overwhelming majority of people reading this share your pain. Do you have any tips that will help everybody spend money wisely? If so, please share them below because we could all benefit from your knowledge.

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Daniel Wallen

Daniel is a writer who focuses on blogging about happiness and motivation at Lifehack.

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Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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