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7 Creative And Effective Ways To Make Money On Twitter

7 Creative And Effective Ways To Make Money On Twitter

There are plenty of ways to make money online, though not all of them are created equal. With Twitter, however, there are more opportunities than ever to generate some extra income.

In fact, some people have even made careers out of the money they make with Twitter, but you don’t have to be a social media wunderkind in order to mimic their success. All it takes is some creativity and the ambition to carry it out.

1. Crowdsource.

Crowdsourcing is the practice of soliciting ideas and contributions from a large group or community. It’s been a marketing darling for years, especially when it comes to social media.

With Twitter, crowdsourcing is an effective way to bring in contributions from your followers (new and old) in order to fund your business or idea. This is especially useful in tandem with something like Kickstarter.

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Crowdsourcing can make you plenty of money, or at least capital, but only if it is done correctly. Read up on plenty of successful case studies before attempting to start your first project.

2. Sell products.

This seems like a no-brainer, but some businesses actually forget that people won’t buy anything if they don’t see a call-to-action.

Now, when it comes to *how* you sell products on Twitter, the conversation becomes a little more old school. One of the most effective strategies is to use promotions and discounts to spur spending.

Some businesses have found plenty of success in “daily deals” and other basic marketing practices that fit well with Twitter. Just make sure that you’re not overwhelming your Twitter feed with pushy selling.

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3. Produce your own Twitter-related service.

Your audience is on Twitter, which means you already know what they’re using in their free time. Take advantage of this by creating a Twitter product that they will want.

For example, a lot of Twitter users would like to use an app that lets them generate hashtags automatically, based on popularity. Something like this may exist already, but you can develop a better product that your followers will love you for.

Alternatively, you can use websites like Fiverr to charge people for building their Twitter presence. I’ve done this myself by helping other people generate (real) Twitter followers for low prices‒$5 for every 100 followers.

4. Use Sponsored Tweets

Did you know you can actually charge businesses for your Tweets? On SponsoredTweets, you can find sponsors who will pay you to Tweet about their products for a fee you arrange.

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Just make sure that you watch what you Tweet on the side. There are ample people who’ve been fired for what they Tweet, and the same goes for losing a relationship with a sponsor.

5. Discover new leads.

Thanks to Twitter’s fantastic search engine tool, you can seek out potential customers based on their bios and what they’re Tweeting.

Let’s say you sell skateboards. You can find new leads by searching for terms like “Need a new skateboard” or “Wish I had a skateboard like this.” From there, you can Tweet at the individual and let them know of a promotion you’re doing on skateboards. You could even offer them a coupon code if they’re interested.

6. Hold a Twitter contest.

Nothing engages people quite as efficiently as a prize. Try linking up with a local business who wants some publicity. Offer to hold a contest with Twitter and be paid a percentage of the sales that come in.

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There are a lot of fun and creative ways to make a contest enticing for followers. You can ask them to be judges, crowdsource them for ideas, or simply ask them to favorite/retweet something.

7. Use YouTube.

If you’re savvy with videos, then consider making Twitter-related tutorials that people are searching for on Twitter. With AdSense, you can monetize your YouTube content and make plenty of money based solely on your Twitter expertise.

More by this author

Jon Negroni

An author and blogger who shares about lifestyle advice

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Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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