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14 Important Steps You Should Take To Free Yourself From Debt

14 Important Steps You Should Take To Free Yourself From Debt

Whether your current debt is large or small, the challenge of getting out from under bills and “I owe yous” can feel insurmountable.

Free yourself from the quicksand by doing the following.

1. Acknowledge that Houston, we do have a problem.

If you are in debt, you have a problem. The degree to which the problem is manageable depends on whether you are in planned, deliberate debt, such as student loans or the purchase of a specific type of vehicle for work; or in chaotic debt, such as the kind that results from taking too many pretty dates out for expensive drinks you can’t afford. You must accept that debt is a problem before you can fix it. So throw your hand in the air, state your name, affirm that you have a challenge before you, and commit to meeting that challenge and free yourself from debt.

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2. Take stock of the situation.

Why are you in debt? What are you spending money on? How much money are you making? Has your debt increased, or are you having trouble climbing out from under hefty interest payments? Are your expenses driving you further into debt, or is it the costs associated with caring for a family member? Don’t worry about finding solutions just yet—first, identify the problem areas.

3. Step back from your emotions.

Spending habits are deeply personal, because they reflect our priorities. There are often added layers of shame, guilt, and regret when discussing debt.  Recognize that none of those emotions will help you solve your current debt problem, and step away from them.  Focus on the fact that you are taking control, you are asserting yourself, and you are disciplined and focused enough to make this happen, all of which are positive emotions.

4. Break out your pen.

Dedicate a notebook or binder to your “get out of debt” plan. Write down anything you identified as a problem area. Be sure to list all debts, who or what you owe money to, and your current payment schedule.

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5. Stop flailing.

While you are evaluating your spending habits and developing a course of action to correct your debt, stop spending. It is much easier to evaluate how and why the boat is leaking without more water pouring in. When you make purchases again, you will be able to do so with deliberate intention.

6. Record all expenditures.

Create a section in your notebook, or an online spreadsheet, to evaluate all expenditures over the course of the last six months. Print credit card statements, online bank records, and dig those receipts out of your purse, car, and gym bag. You must gain an accurate picture of where your money is going, and if debt is a problem, you likely don’t have this picture as in focus as you would like.

7. Identify patterns.

Can you identify patterns in your spending? Do you, for instance, always break the bank when you visit certain stores, or the day you get your paycheck? Do you spend a great deal of money on certain activities?

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8. Categorize spending, and prioritize.

Food, water, basic shelter, simple transportation, and functional clothing are needs.  Everything else is a “want.”  Break your spending into categories, starting with “needs” and “wants.”  Cut out all unnecessary items, and realize this might mean your cable subscription, smart phone, high speed internet, and a slew of other high-tag luxuries modern man is accustomed to having at his fingertips.

9. Be willing to make big changes.

Is rent eating you alive, or are you spending high dollars in gas each month to commute? You may have to move, locally or to another state, to lower your cost of living. You may have to drastically downsize. You may have to put that hobby on hold for a while. Commit to doing whatever it takes to get out of debt.

10. Seek expert help.

You are not the only person to stagger under debt, nor will you be the last. Talk to a financial planner at your bank, or attend a debt management class. There are numerous resources available.

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11. Do your own research.

Anytime the subject is money, be sure to actively engage your brain, scrutinizing all information you receive to confirm or reject its application to your financial situation. Get a library card, and spend some quality time there getting smart on financial management basics, as well as any unique considerations you may have. Bonus: libraries often offer basic financial management classes

12. Get creative in boosting income.

An extra dollar earned is an extra dollar to pay off that debt.  No opportunity is too menial, too demanding, or too low-paying for your time; if you’re in debt, you literally cannot afford to pass up income opportunities. Take a formal second job, or babysit, walk dogs, shovel manure at a community barn, scrub dishes, freelance online—aggressively seek opportunities for additional income and seize them.

13. Pay the maximum monthly amount possible.

Does your lender have penalties for paying off your debt early? Pay the maximum monthly amount possible without penalty, on time, every month.

14. Stay the course.

It took you a while to accumulate debt, and it is going to take you a while to get out from under it. Remain patient, keep chipping away at it, and soon you will be debt free and relaxed.

Featured photo credit: LendingMemo.com via flickr.com

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Published on November 20, 2018

The Best Ways to Save Money Even Impulsive Spenders Can Get Behind

The Best Ways to Save Money Even Impulsive Spenders Can Get Behind

The truth is, there are many “money saving guides” online, but most don’t cover the root issue for not saving.

Once I’d discovered a few key factors that allowed me to save 10k in one year, I realized why most articles couldn’t help me. The problem is that even with the right strategies you can still fail to save money. You need to have the right systems in place and the right mindset.

In this guide, I’ll cover the best ways to save money — practical yet powerful steps you can take to start saving more. It won’t be easy but with hard work, I’m confident you’ll be able to save more money–even if you’re an impulsive spender.

Why Your Past Prevents You from Saving Money

Are you constantly thinking about your financial mistakes?

If so, these thoughts are holding you back from saving.

I get it, you wish you could go back in time to avoid your financial downfalls. But dwelling over your past will only rob you from your future. Instead, reflect on your mistakes and ask yourself what lessons you can learn from them.

It wasn’t easy for me to accept that I had accumulated thousands of dollars in credit card debt. Once I did, I started heading in the right direction. Embrace your past failures and use them as an opportunity to set new financial goals.

For example, after accepting that you’re thousands of dollars in debt create a plan to be debt free in a year or two. This way when you’ll be at peace even when you get negative thoughts about your finances. Now you can focus more time on saving and less on your past financial mistakes.

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How to Effortlessly Track Your Spending

Stop manually tracking your spending.

Leverage powerful analytic tools such as Personal Capital and these money management apps to do the work for you. This tool has worked for me and has kept me motivated to why I’m saving in the first place. Once you login to your Personal Capital dashboard, you’re able to view your net worth.

When I’d first signed up with Personal Capital, I had a negative net worth, but this motivated me to save more. With this tool, you can also view your spending patterns, expenses, and how much money you’re saving.

Use your net worth as your north star to saving more. Whenever you experience financial setbacks, view how far you’ve come along. Saving money is only half the battle, being consistent is the other half.

The Truth on Why You Keep Failing

Saving money isn’t sexy. If it was, wouldn’t everyone be doing it?

Some people are natural savers, but most are impulsive spenders. Instead of denying that you’re an impulsive spender, embrace it.

Don’t try to save 60 to 70% of your income if this means you’ll live a miserable life. Saving money isn’t a race but a marathon. You’re saving for retirement and for large purchases.

If you’re currently having a hard time saving, start spending more money on nice things. This may sound counterintuitive but hear me out. Wouldn’t it be better to save $200 each month for 12 months instead of $500 for 3 months?

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Most people run into trouble because they create budgets that set them up for failure. This system won’t work for those who are frugal, but chances are they don’t need help saving. This system is for those who can’t save money and need to be rewarded for their hard work.

Only because you’re buying nice things doesn’t mean that you’ll save less. Here are some rules you should have in place:

  1. Save more than 50% of your available money (after expenses)
  2. Only buy nice things after saving
  3. Automate your savings with automatic bank transfers

These are the same rules that helped me save thousands each year while buying the latest iPhone. Focus only on items that are important to you. Remember, you can afford anything but not everything.

How to Foolproof Yourself out of Debt

Personal finance is a game. On one end, you’re earning money; and on the to other, you’re saving. But what ends up counting in the end isn’t how much you earn but how much you save. Research shows that about 60% of Americans spend more than they save.[1]

So how can you separate yourself from the 60%?

By not accumulating more debt. This way you’ll have more money to save and avoid having more financial obligations. A great way to stop accumulating debt is using cash to pay for all your transactions.

This will be challenging, depending on how reliant you are with your credit card, but it’s worth the effort. Not only will you stop accruing debt, but you’ll also be more conscious with what you buy.

For example, you’ll think twice about purchasing a new $200 headphone despite having the cash to buy them. According to a poll conducted by The CreditCards.com, 5 out of 6 Americans are impulsive spenders.[2]

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Telling yourself that you’ll have the discipline to not buy things won’t cut it. This is equal to having junk food in your fridge while trying to eat healthy–it’s only a matter of time before you slip. By using cash to make your purchases, you’ll spend less and save more.

A Proven Formula to Skyrocket Your Savings

Having proven systems in place to help you save more is important, but they’re not the best way to save money.

You can search for dozens of ways to save money, but there’ll always be a limit. Instead of spending the majority of your effort saving, look for ways to increase your income. The truth is that once you have the right systems in place, saving is easy.

What’s challenging is earning more money. There are many routes you can take to achieve this. For example, you can work long and hard at your current job to earn a raise. But there’s one problem–you’re depending on someone else to give you a raise.

Your company will have to have the budget, and you’ll have to know how to toot your own horn to get this raise. This isn’t to say that earning a raise is impossible, but things are better when you’re in control right? That’s why building a side-hustle is the best way to increase your income.

Think of your side-hustle as a part-time job doing something you enjoy. You can sell items on eBay for a profit, or design websites for small businesses. Building a side-hustle will be on the hardest things you’ll do, be too stubborn to quit.

During the early stages, you won’t be making money and that’s okay. Since you already have a source of income, you won’t be dependent on your side-hustle to pay for your expenses. Depending on how much time you invest in your side-hustle, it can one day replace your current income.

Whatever route you take, focus more on earning and save as much as possible. You have more control than you give yourself credit for.

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Transform Yourself into a Saving Money Machine

Saving money isn’t complicated but it’s one of the hardest things you’ll do.

By learning from your mistakes and rewarding yourself after saving you’ll save more. What would you do with an extra $200 or $500 each month? To some, this is life-changing money that can improve the quality of their lives.

The truth is saving money is an art. Save too much and you’ll quit, but save too little and you’ll pay for the consequences in the future. Saving money takes effort and having the right systems in place.

Imagine if you’d started saving an extra $100 this next month? Or, saved $20K in one year? Although it’s hard to imagine, this can be your reality if you follow the principles covered in this guide.

Take a moment to brainstorm which goals you’d be able to reach if you had extra money each month. Use these goals as motivation to help you stay on track on your journey to saving more. If I was able to save thousands of dollars with little guidance, imagine what you’ll be able to do.

What are you waiting for? Go and start saving money, the sky is your limit.

Featured photo credit: rawpixel via unsplash.com

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