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11 Money Mistakes You Don’t Realize You’re Making

11 Money Mistakes You Don’t Realize You’re Making

If you’ve got money and you know it, take it out your pocket and show it. *snatches money out your hand and runs.* Thanks.

Here are some other mistakes you’re making with your money.

1. You Buy Extended Warranties

I’ve worked at a variety of retail stores, and they all require every employee to push the extended warranty. They do this because it’s a sale where you’re giving them money for a product they don’t have to stock. They gain free money, because the odds of you actually using that warranty are slim. If your product lasts six months, it’ll last two years, unless you break it in a way that’s not covered by the warranty anyway.

“Use warranties that come with the product or service,” says financial expert Harrine Freeman. “Keep the original packaging and receipt so if an issue arises, you can get the item fixed without delay.”

2. You Have Too Much Insurance

You’re required by law to meet certain insurance requirements for your vehicle and any collateral loan. Insurance agents will push to give you more insurance because they’re commissioned salespeople. Whether it’s your car, home or body, don’t buy more insurance than you need, or you’re just paying to keep everyone else’s premiums low.

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Also avoid cell phone insurance at all costs – these plans are difficult to use and cancel, and they’ll often charge you more to replace your phone than the actual phone manufacturer, the retail store you bought it at, or your service provider.

3. You Pay for Free Services

You can monitor your credit report for free by getting a copy once every year, yet credit monitoring services charge you for the privilege. It’s like paying to park in a free lot (which you’ll also do if there’s an event nearby). Avoid paying for anything you can do for free.

4. You Upgrade Too Often

When Apple releases a new iPhone, people wait in line for it. Android users are getting just as bad. Usually, the upgrades are minor. Sure, I can use my phone as a projector, but how often does that really come up?

Don’t get distracted by all those shiny features – buy a phone within your budget, and hold onto it for 3-4 years. By the time you upgrade, you can get a free (or extremely cheap) phone that’s still an upgrade over your current one without paying an arm and a leg

5. You Ignore Hidden Fees

Banks make their money by charging fees. They’ll charge both you and the merchants you shop at as much as possible, and many businesses pass these fees on to customers. Shell, for example, charges you for using your card. Shell is also notorious for keeping their gas prices higher because they have a branded credit card that many people confuse for a store card. The reality is that card can be used anywhere, so use it to shop elsewhere.

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“Avoid using out-of-network ATMs,” adds Freeman. “Get enough cash from your network ATM on a weekly basis to avoid fees. Avoid multiple trips to the ATM during the week. Keep track of your bank balance to avoid overdraft fees.”

6. You Don’t Save

I’ve been on my grind since I was five years old. When I was 10, I got a paper route, and my parents made me put half of my money immediately into a savings account (which was actually an envelope in a file cabinet in their house because banks don’t give accounts to ten-year-olds). As annoying as it was, it was a great way to learn about savings

You don’t have to give up half your paycheck, but you do need to put a set amount aside. Treat your savings account as your most important bill – it’s for you, and you shouldn’t short-change yourself for the benefit of any bank, grocery store, service provider or anyone else.

7. You Overpay Taxes

I get that most people don’t understand taxes. I understand that feeling of starting the year with a huge tax refund. If you don’t have the discipline to save, it can be tempting to let the government do it for you.

The problem with this line of thinking is you’re giving the government free money. They deposit it and earn interest that could’ve been yours. You think you’re making a smart financial decision, but what you’re really doing is losing money. The ideal tax situation isn’t the huge refunds advertised by H&R Block and all the other accountants; it’s zero.

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8. You Buy Things You Don’t Need

If you can’t decide between an Xbox One and a PS4, the answer isn’t both; it’s neither. You may like purses and shoes, but you don’t need so many of them. Just because you see celebrities showing off all their swag doesn’t mean you should be doing the same thing. Learn to separate wants from needs and live within your means.

9. You Join Too Many Clubs

If you have a membership to Costco, Sam’s Club, Amazon Prime, and more, you’re wasting your money. Trying to keep up on all those frequent shopper clubs is toxic too. You’ll end up spending more on fees and unnecessary purchases than you’ll save from any of their deals. Their business model is set up specifically for this purpose.

If you’re single, consider asking a friend or family member to be added as an additional user on their account. A single person doesn’t need too many bulk items, especially perishables.

10. You Waste Food

Regardless of whether it’s bulk or single serving, don’t buy more perishable goods than you can eat. Every crumb you throw away is a crumb you paid for. You may as well just dump the contents of your wallet on the ground every time you go to the store.

Track your diet – it’s good for both your health and wealth. By focusing on your food intake, you’ll have an idea of your eating habits. This will help you make smart spending decisions at the grocery store. From there, all you have to do is cook the food you have instead of going out to eat all the time.

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11. You Lack Patience

Merchants love taking advantage of our impulse to spend money. It’s easiest to see this concept with movies. If you want to see a movie on opening night, you’re paying the highest price possible. You can’t even use a coupon because it’s a special engagement. If you want to see a movie in theaters, wait until it’s in the dollar theater. Otherwise you can see it on Redbox for $1 or Netflix for free. All you have to do is wait.

Now stop making money mistakes and start living like a shark.

Featured photo credit: Nuzree via pixabay.com

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Published on November 8, 2018

How to Answer the Tough Question: What are Your Salary Requirements?

How to Answer the Tough Question: What are Your Salary Requirements?

After a few months of hard work and dozens of phone calls later, you finally land a job opportunity.

But then, you’re asked about your salary requirements and your mind goes blank. So, you offer a lower salary believing this will increase your odds at getting hired.

Unfortunately, this is the wrong approach.

Your salary requirements can make or break your odds at getting hired. But only if you’re not prepared.

Ask for a salary too high with no room for negotiation and your potential employer will not be able to afford you. Aim too low and employers will perceive as you offering low value. The trick is to aim as high as possible while keeping both parties feel happy.

Of course, you can’t command a high price without bringing value.

The good news is that learning how to be a high-value employee is possible. You have to work on the right tasks to grow in the right areas. Here are a few tactics to negotiate your salary requirements with confidence.

1. Hack time to accomplish more than most

Do you want to get paid well for your hard work? Of course you do. I hate to break it to you, but so do most people.

With so much competition, this won’t be an easy task to achieve. That’s why you need to become a pro at time management.

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Do you know how much free time you have? Not the free time during your lunch break or after you’ve finished working at your day job. Rather, the free time when you’re looking at your phone or watching your favorite TV show.

Data from 2017 shows that Americans spend roughly 3 hours watching TV. This is time poorly spent if you’re not happy with your current lifestyle. Instead, focus on working on your goals whenever you have free time.

For example, if your commute to/from work is 1 hour, listen to an educational Podcast. If your lunch break is 30 minutes, read for 10 to 15 minutes. And if you have a busy life with only 30–60 minutes to spare after work, use this time to work on your personal goals.

Create a morning routine that will set you up for success every day. Start waking up 1 to 2 hours earlier to have more time to work on your most important tasks. Use tools like ATracker to break down which activities you’re spending the most time in.

It won’t be easy to analyze your entire day, so set boundaries. For example, if you have 4 hours of free time each day, spend at least 2 of these hours working on important tasks.

2. Set your own boundaries

Having a successful career isn’t always about the money. According to Gallup, about 70% of employees aren’t satisfied with their current jobs.[1]

Earning more money isn’t a bad thing, but choosing a higher salary over the traits that are the most important to you is. For example, if you enjoy spending time with your family, reject job offers requiring a lot of travel.

Here are some important traits to consider:

  • Work and life balance – The last thing you’d want is a job that forces you to work 60+ hours each week. Unless this is the type of environment you’d want. Understand how your potential employer emphasizes work/life balance.
  • Self-development opportunities – Having the option to grow within your company is important. Once you learn how to do your tasks well, you’ll start becoming less engaged. Choose a company that encourages employee growth.
  • Company culture – The stereotypical cubicle job where one feels miserable doesn’t have to be your fate. Not all companies are equal in culture. Take, for example, Google, who invests heavily in keeping their employees happy.[2]

These are some of the most important traits to look for in a company, but there are others. Make it your mission to rank which traits are important to you. This way you’ll stop applying to the wrong companies and stay focused on what matters to you more.

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3. Continuously invest in yourself

Investing in yourself is the best investment you can make. Cliche I know, but true nonetheless.

You’ll grow as a person and gain confidence with the value you’ll be able to bring to others. Investing in yourself doesn’t have to be expensive. For example, you can read books to expand your knowledge in different fields.

Don’t get stuck into the habit of reading without a purpose. Instead, choose books that will help you expand in a field you’re looking to grow. At the same time, don’t limit yourself to reading books in one subject–create a healthy balance.

Podcasts are also a great medium to learn new subjects from experts in different fields. The best part is they’re free and you can consume them on your commute to/from work.

Paid education makes sense if you have little to no debt. If you decide to go back to school, be sure to apply for scholarships and grants to have the least amount of debt. Regardless of which route you take to make it a habit to grow every day.

It won’t be easy, but this will work to your advantage. Most people won’t spend most of their free time investing in themselves. This will allow you to grow faster than most, and stand out from your competition.

4. Document the value you bring

Resumes are a common way companies filter employees through the hiring process. Here’s the big secret: It’s not the only way you can showcase your skills.

To request for a higher salary than most, you have to do what most are unwilling to do. Since you’re already investing in yourself, make it a habit to showcase your skills online.

A great way to do this is to create your own website. Pick your first and last name as your domain name. If this domain is already taken, get creative and choose one that makes sense.

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Here are some ideas:

  • joesmith.com
  • joeasmith.com
  • joesmithprojects.com

Nowadays, building a website is easy. Once you have your website setup, begin producing content. For example, if you a developer you can post the applications you’re building.

During your interviews, you’ll have an online reference to showcase your accomplishments. You can use your accomplishments to justify your salary requirements. Since most people don’t do this, you’ll have a higher chance of employers accepting your offer

5. Hide your salary requirements

Avoid giving you salary requirements early in the interview process.

But if you get asked early, deflect this question in a non-defensive manner. Explain to the employer that you’d like to understand your role better first. They’ll most likely agree with you; but if they don’t, give them a range.

The truth is great employers are more concerned about your skills and the value you bring to the company. They understand that a great employee is an investment, able to earn them more than their salary.

Remember that a job interview isn’t only for the employer, it’s also for you. If the employer is more interested in your salary requirements, this may not be a good sign. Use this question to gauge if the company you’re interviewing is worth working for.

6. Do just enough research

Research average salary compensation in your industry, then wing it.

Use tools like Glassdoor to research the average salary compensation for your industry. Then leverage LinkedIn’s company data that’s provided with its Pro membership. You can view a company’s employee growth and the total number of job openings.

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Use this information to make informed decisions when deciding on your salary requirements. But don’t limit yourself to the average salary range. Companies will usually pay you more for the value you have.

Big companies will often pay more than smaller ones.[3] Whatever your desired salary amount is, always ask for a higher amount. Employers will often reject your initial offer. In fact, offer a salary range that’ll give you and your employer enough room to negotiate.

7. Get compensated by your value

Asking for the salary you deserve is an art. On one end, you have to constantly invest in yourself to offer massive value. But this isn’t enough. You also have to become a great negotiator.

Imagine requesting a high salary and because you bring a lot of value, employers are willing to pay you this. Wouldn’t this be amazing?

Most settle for average because they’re not confident with what they have to offer. Most don’t invest in themselves because they’re not dedicated enough. But not you.

You know you deserve to get paid well, and you’re willing to put in the work. Yet, you won’t sacrifice your most important values over a higher salary.

The bottom line

You’ve got what it takes to succeed in your career. Invest in yourself, learn how to negotiate, and do research. The next time you’re asked about your salary requirements, you won’t fumble.

You’ll showcase your skills with confidence and get the salary you deserve. What’s holding you back now?

Featured photo credit: LinkedIn Sales Navigator via unsplash.com

Reference

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