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100 Questions to Help You Write, Publish, and Sell Your Ebook

100 Questions to Help You Write, Publish, and Sell Your Ebook
    Photo credit: nuestraherenciaco (CC BY-SA 2.0)

    Just a few years ago, if you wanted to be a published author you had to jump through a series of hoops involving literary agents and publishers. Then you faced a seemingly endless wait before your book finally hit the shelves.

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    Boy, how times have changed.

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    Now, if you have access to a computer you can write and publish an ebook and become a published author in a few short weeks.

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    However, a lot of people have set the goal of writing an ebook and yet they can’t seem to get started.

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    If you’re one of these people, it may very well be that all you need is to answer a series of important questions to help get your creative juices flowing. Doing this can also motivate you to take action.

    Below you’ll find 100 questions that will help you write, publish, and sell your ebook. I suggest that you take the time to sit down and answer each one.

    The 100 Questions

    1. Why do you want to write an ebook?
    2. What are some of the ways in which writing and publishing an ebook might help your business?
    3. How will you judge the success of your eBook?
    4. Will you write your ebook alone, or will you collaborate with someone else?
    5. Have you tried to write an ebook in the past, but failed? If so, why do you think you failed? What lessons did you learn from that failure?
    6. Have you chosen a topic that you’re passionate about?
    7. What is your deadline for publishing your ebook?
    8. How much time do you plan to devote to writing your eBook each day?
    9. How will you make the time to write your ebook?
    10. Do you have a strategy in place for dealing with procrastination?
    11. How long will your ebook be?
    12. Who are your ideal readers?
    13. What are some of your ideal readers’ characteristics?
    14. What is the specific problem that your ebook will solve for your ideal reader?
    15. What are some of the obstacles and/or challenges that your ideal reader has been confronting in relation to the subject matter of your ebook?
    16. Can you come up with ten questions your readers might be asking themselves about your topic (each question could correspond to a chapter in your ebook)?
    17. In what ways will your readers benefit when they implement the ideas in your ebook?
    18. Will you be offering any measurable results (such as lose five pounds in ten weeks, double your sales, or write an eBook in 30 days)?
    19. Do you have any special expertise in the area that you’re writing about? Is there any reason why you’re particularly credible (for example, you’re a nutritionist and you’re writing an ebook on how to lose weight)?
    20. What have you done to make sure that there’s a market for your ebook?
    21. Are you sure that there are people out there who are willing to pay for the information that you’re planning to include in your ebook?
    22. Are you giving people what they want, or what you think they want?
    23. Have you researched how much competition there is out there on your topic?
    24. Based on the law of supply and demand, is it worth the time and effort that it will take you to write the ebook?
    25. Of all the possible topics that you could be writing an ebook about, are you sure that you’ve chosen the best one?
    26. What keywords will you be targeting (for your ebook’s title, the domain name for your sales page, and your sales copy)? What are the keywords or keyword phrases that your target audience is likely to use when looking for information online on your topic?
    27. What keyword phrases are your competitors targeting?
    28. Have you broken down the process of writing an ebook into small chunks that you can knock down one at a time?
    29. Have you set interim deadlines to help you make sure that you’re going to meet your final deadline?
    30. Have you set a reward that you’re going to give yourself each time that you meet one of your interim deadlines?
    31. How will you keep yourself motivated as you write your ebook?
    32. Is there someone who can hold you accountable (someone who will make sure that you’re meeting all of your interim deadlines)?
    33. How do you intend to get ideas on what to write for your ebook?
    34. Have you already written ezine articles, blog posts, and so on that you can incorporate into the ebook?
    35. How do you plan to take notes as you conduct research for your ebook?
    36. Are you going to include anecdotes (examples from your own life or the life of others)?
    37. Can you explain concepts in a catchy way that will make people remember them (so that they’re more likely to apply them)?
    38. Will you include images and quotes?
    39. What are some examples out there of the type of ebook that you would like to write?
    40.  What are some of the ideas, strategies, tools, and tips that you intend to share in your eBook?
    41.  What are the titles of the leading books in your field?
    42. Have you read or at least skimmed the top five books in your field?
    43. What are some of the things in the leading books in your field that you agree with?
    44. What are some of the things in the leading books in your field that you disagree with?
    45. Do the books available cover your subject matter well? Is there a gap in these books?
    46. Do you have a Unique Selling Proposition that would make your ebook standout from the books that are already available on your topic?
    47. Why would a book buyer prefer your ebook over what’s already out there?
    48. How do you plan to organize your ebook? (For example, if you’re going to explain a series of steps, it makes sense if each step is explained in a separate chapter. As another example, you could answer the 100 most commonly asked questions in your field, and you could devote a page to each question and answer. As a last example, you could expose and debunk the top ten myths in your field, or offer ten tips to solve a particular problem. Again, each myth or tip could be a separate chapter.)
    49. Does each chapter in your ebook open with a hook that grabs your readers’ attention?
    50. Does each chapter in your ebook solve a particular problem related to your topic?
    51. Does each chapter clearly convey the information that your readers need? Is the information incomplete? Do any ideas need to be fleshed out further? Would an example make the ideas in the chapter easier to understand?
    52. Have you made sure that every chapter in your ebook serves a purpose and provides value?
    53. Have you expressed your ideas clearly?
    54. Are you making the reading experience enjoyable for your readers?
    55. Are you giving others credit when you use their ideas?
    56. Does each chapter have a title that’s clear, concise, and compelling?
    57. Is your subject too broad? Do you need to narrow it down?
    58. As you read each chapter, think of someone who has just had a meal. Are your readers still hungry; meaning that you didn’t answer their most important questions or you didn’t explain things clearly? Are your readers satisfied; meaning that you did a good job and your readers are happy with the amount of information that you provided? Are your readers uncomfortably full; meaning that the chapter is too long and complex?
    59. Do you have a title and subtitle in mind for your ebook?
    60. Have you put together a focus group to test your ebook’s title and subtitle?
    61.  Are you going to conduct interviews (for example, interview a successful internet marketer on how to conduct keyword research)?
    62. Are you going to conduct experiments (for example, teach your brother how to set up a blog and start making money in 60 days)?
    63. How do you plan to format your eBook?
    64. Are you going to include bonuses with your ebook?
    65. Will you include audio or video?
    66. Can you include spreadsheets or templates?
    67. Can you include checklists?
    68. Are you going to have exercises at the end of each chapter so that people apply what they learned in each chapter?
    69. Can you include worksheets?
    70. Have you put your first draft aside for a few days so that you can look at it again with fresh eyes?
    71. Do you have someone who can help you proofread your ebook to make sure that it doesn’t have any spelling or grammatical mistakes?
    72. How do you plan to compile your eBook (for example, .EXE or .PDF)?
    73. What file-formats will your ebook be available in? Which devices will your readers be able to use to read your eBook
    74. Are you going to create a cover yourself, or are you going to hire someone to do it for you?
    75. Are you going to send an advance copy of your ebook to a few people in order to get testimonials?
    76. Where will you sell your ebook?
    77. Do you currently have a platform (such as a blog) from which you can sell your ebook?
    78. Do you have a social media presence (such as Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook)? If so, how do you plan to use social media in order to promote your ebook?
    79. Do you plan to build a Squidoo lens about your ebook?
    80. Do you plan to write ezine articles to promote your ebook? If so, which ezines will you be sending articles to?
    81. Will you be writing guest posts to promote your ebook (if so, what blogs will you be targeting)?
    82. Do you plan to participate in forums and leave comments on popular blogs about your topic in order to promote your ebook?
    83. Have you set any email alerts in order to track your topic?
    84. Are you going to offer free chapters of your ebook in order to entice people to buy your ebook?
    85. Are you going to offer a free mini-ecourse so that people are exposed to your message at least 7 times (marketers argue that people need to be exposed to your message 7 times before they’ll buy your product)?
    86. Can you begin to grow interest in your ebook while you’re writing it (publish excerpts or write blog posts that are related to your topic)?
    87. Will you be offering an affiliate program so that others sell your ebook for you?
    88. Are you going to set up a separate website to sell your ebook?
    89. Are you planning to buy the domain for your ebook’s title?
    90. Do you have a template for your sales page?
    91. Are you going to offer free coaching to those who buy your ebook (or free email support)?
    92. Are you going to offer a time-limited offer (such as offering your ebook at half price for a few days as soon as you launch it)?
    93. What’s your pricing strategy? Are you going to sell your ebook at the same price as your competition?
    94. Have you conducted a survey in order to determine what people would be willing to pay for your ebook?
    95. Are you going to have any back-end products?
    96. How will you deliver the ebook to those who purchase it?
    97. How will you be paid? What forms of payment will you accept?
    98. Will you get an ISBN?
    99. Are you going to offer a money-back guarantee?
    100. Are you planning to publish a hard copy version of your ebook?

    Now that you’ve answered these questions, you just might end up with the first draft of your ebook, along with a strategy detailing how you’re going to publish it — and then sell it.

    More by this author

    Marelisa Fabrega

    Marelisa is a lawyer and entrepreneur who blogs about creativity, productivity, and getting the most out of life.

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    Last Updated on January 21, 2020

    How to Develop a Millionaire Mindset in 6 Simple Steps

    How to Develop a Millionaire Mindset in 6 Simple Steps

    We all like to dream about being financially wealthy. For most people though, it remains a dream and nothing more. Why is that?

    It’s because most people don’t set their mind to achieving that goal. They might not be happy in their current situation but they’re comfortable – and comfort is one of the biggest enemies of growth.

    How do you go about developing that millionaire mindset? By following these simple steps:

    1. Focus On What You Want – And Take It!

    So many people are too timid to admit they want something and go for it. When there is something that you want to accomplish don’t think “I could never actually do that”, think “I could do that and I WILL do that”.

    Millionaires play to win, not to avoid defeat.

    This doesn’t mean to have to become a selfish jerk. What it means is becoming more assertive and honest with yourself. You don’t have to grab off other people. There is a big pot of unclaimed gold in the middle of the table — why shouldn’t you be the one to claim it? You deserve it!

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    2. Become Goal-Orientated

    It’s almost impossible to achieve anything if you don’t set firm goals. Only lottery winners become millionaires overnight. By setting yourself attainable goals, you will get there eventually. Don’t try to get rich quickly — get rich slowly.

    Let’s take the idea of making your first million dollars and expand on what kind of goals you might set to get there. Let’s also say you’re starting at a break-even position – you’re making enough to get by with a few luxuries, but nothing more.

    Your goal for the first year can be having $10,000 in the bank within a year. It won’t be easy but it is doable. Next, you need to figure out the steps you need to take to achieve that goal.

    Always look at ways to make growth before cutbacks. With that in mind, you might want to see if you can negotiate a pay rise with your boss, or if there’s another job out there that will pay better. You might be comfortable in your old job but remember, comfort stunts growth.

    You may also have other skills outside of your workplace that you can monetize to boost your bank balance. Maybe you can design websites for people, at a fee of course, or make alterations to clothes.

    If this is still not enough to make the money you need to save $10,000 in a year, then it’s time to look at cutbacks. Do you have a bunch of old junk that someone else might love? Sell it! Do you really need to spend $10 on your lunch everyday when you could make your own for a fraction of the cost?

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    If you are to become a millionaire, you need to start accumulating money.

    Here’re some tips to help you: How to Become Goal Oriented and Achieve More in Life

    3. Don’t Spend Your Money – Invest It

    The reason you need to accumulate money is for step three. Millionaires tend to be frugal people, and that’s because they know the true value of money is in investing. Being your own boss goes hand-in-hand with becoming a millionaire. You’ll want to quit your regular job at some point.

    Stop working for your money and make your money work for you.

    Rather than buying yourself a new iPad, that $500 could be used to invest in the stock market. Find the right shares (more on that later), and that money could easily double within a year.

    There’s not just the stock market — there’s also property, and your own education.

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    4. Never Stop Learning

    The best thing you can invest in is yourself.

    Once most people leave the education system, they think their learning days are over. Well theirs might be, but yours shouldn’t be. Successful people continually learn and adapt.

    Billionaire Warren Buffet estimates that he read at least 100 books on investing before he turned twenty. Most people never read another book after they’ve left school. Who would you rather be?

    Learn everything you can about how economics works, how the stocks markets work, how they trend.

    Learn new skills. If you have an interest in it, learn everything you can about it. You’d be surprised at how often, seemingly useless skills, can become extremely useful in the right situation.

    Start developing the habit of learning continuously: How to Create a Habit of Continuous Learning for a Better You

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    5. Think Big

    While I advise to start off with small goals, you absolutely should have a big goal in mind. If you have a business idea, then that is your ultimate goal – to start that business and make a success of it. If you want to invest your way to millions of dollars and do little work other than research, then that is your big goal.

    There is no shame in not achieving a big goal. If you run a business and aim to make $1 million profit in a year and “only” make $200,000, then you’re still significantly ahead of most people.

    Aim for the stars, if you fail you’ll still be over the moon.

    6. Enjoy the Attention

    To be successful, you have to be willing to promote yourself and enjoy the attention to a certain extent. Now the attention doesn’t need to be on yourself, it could be on your brand, but attention definitely attracts money.

    Never be embarrassed to get your name out there. That means finding a spotlight and being brave enough to step right up underneath it.

    If you run a business, try contacting the local papers. You’d be surprised at how amenable they often are to running a story about you and your business, and it’s all free publicity.

    Above all, remember: You control your own destiny. Push hard enough for anything and you’ll get it.

    More About Thinking Smart

    Featured photo credit: Austin Distel via unsplash.com

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