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100 Questions to Help You Write, Publish, and Sell Your Ebook

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100 Questions to Help You Write, Publish, and Sell Your Ebook
    Photo credit: nuestraherenciaco (CC BY-SA 2.0)

    Just a few years ago, if you wanted to be a published author you had to jump through a series of hoops involving literary agents and publishers. Then you faced a seemingly endless wait before your book finally hit the shelves.

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    Boy, how times have changed.

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    Now, if you have access to a computer you can write and publish an ebook and become a published author in a few short weeks.

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    However, a lot of people have set the goal of writing an ebook and yet they can’t seem to get started.

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    If you’re one of these people, it may very well be that all you need is to answer a series of important questions to help get your creative juices flowing. Doing this can also motivate you to take action.

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    Below you’ll find 100 questions that will help you write, publish, and sell your ebook. I suggest that you take the time to sit down and answer each one.

    The 100 Questions

    1. Why do you want to write an ebook?
    2. What are some of the ways in which writing and publishing an ebook might help your business?
    3. How will you judge the success of your eBook?
    4. Will you write your ebook alone, or will you collaborate with someone else?
    5. Have you tried to write an ebook in the past, but failed? If so, why do you think you failed? What lessons did you learn from that failure?
    6. Have you chosen a topic that you’re passionate about?
    7. What is your deadline for publishing your ebook?
    8. How much time do you plan to devote to writing your eBook each day?
    9. How will you make the time to write your ebook?
    10. Do you have a strategy in place for dealing with procrastination?
    11. How long will your ebook be?
    12. Who are your ideal readers?
    13. What are some of your ideal readers’ characteristics?
    14. What is the specific problem that your ebook will solve for your ideal reader?
    15. What are some of the obstacles and/or challenges that your ideal reader has been confronting in relation to the subject matter of your ebook?
    16. Can you come up with ten questions your readers might be asking themselves about your topic (each question could correspond to a chapter in your ebook)?
    17. In what ways will your readers benefit when they implement the ideas in your ebook?
    18. Will you be offering any measurable results (such as lose five pounds in ten weeks, double your sales, or write an eBook in 30 days)?
    19. Do you have any special expertise in the area that you’re writing about? Is there any reason why you’re particularly credible (for example, you’re a nutritionist and you’re writing an ebook on how to lose weight)?
    20. What have you done to make sure that there’s a market for your ebook?
    21. Are you sure that there are people out there who are willing to pay for the information that you’re planning to include in your ebook?
    22. Are you giving people what they want, or what you think they want?
    23. Have you researched how much competition there is out there on your topic?
    24. Based on the law of supply and demand, is it worth the time and effort that it will take you to write the ebook?
    25. Of all the possible topics that you could be writing an ebook about, are you sure that you’ve chosen the best one?
    26. What keywords will you be targeting (for your ebook’s title, the domain name for your sales page, and your sales copy)? What are the keywords or keyword phrases that your target audience is likely to use when looking for information online on your topic?
    27. What keyword phrases are your competitors targeting?
    28. Have you broken down the process of writing an ebook into small chunks that you can knock down one at a time?
    29. Have you set interim deadlines to help you make sure that you’re going to meet your final deadline?
    30. Have you set a reward that you’re going to give yourself each time that you meet one of your interim deadlines?
    31. How will you keep yourself motivated as you write your ebook?
    32. Is there someone who can hold you accountable (someone who will make sure that you’re meeting all of your interim deadlines)?
    33. How do you intend to get ideas on what to write for your ebook?
    34. Have you already written ezine articles, blog posts, and so on that you can incorporate into the ebook?
    35. How do you plan to take notes as you conduct research for your ebook?
    36. Are you going to include anecdotes (examples from your own life or the life of others)?
    37. Can you explain concepts in a catchy way that will make people remember them (so that they’re more likely to apply them)?
    38. Will you include images and quotes?
    39. What are some examples out there of the type of ebook that you would like to write?
    40.  What are some of the ideas, strategies, tools, and tips that you intend to share in your eBook?
    41.  What are the titles of the leading books in your field?
    42. Have you read or at least skimmed the top five books in your field?
    43. What are some of the things in the leading books in your field that you agree with?
    44. What are some of the things in the leading books in your field that you disagree with?
    45. Do the books available cover your subject matter well? Is there a gap in these books?
    46. Do you have a Unique Selling Proposition that would make your ebook standout from the books that are already available on your topic?
    47. Why would a book buyer prefer your ebook over what’s already out there?
    48. How do you plan to organize your ebook? (For example, if you’re going to explain a series of steps, it makes sense if each step is explained in a separate chapter. As another example, you could answer the 100 most commonly asked questions in your field, and you could devote a page to each question and answer. As a last example, you could expose and debunk the top ten myths in your field, or offer ten tips to solve a particular problem. Again, each myth or tip could be a separate chapter.)
    49. Does each chapter in your ebook open with a hook that grabs your readers’ attention?
    50. Does each chapter in your ebook solve a particular problem related to your topic?
    51. Does each chapter clearly convey the information that your readers need? Is the information incomplete? Do any ideas need to be fleshed out further? Would an example make the ideas in the chapter easier to understand?
    52. Have you made sure that every chapter in your ebook serves a purpose and provides value?
    53. Have you expressed your ideas clearly?
    54. Are you making the reading experience enjoyable for your readers?
    55. Are you giving others credit when you use their ideas?
    56. Does each chapter have a title that’s clear, concise, and compelling?
    57. Is your subject too broad? Do you need to narrow it down?
    58. As you read each chapter, think of someone who has just had a meal. Are your readers still hungry; meaning that you didn’t answer their most important questions or you didn’t explain things clearly? Are your readers satisfied; meaning that you did a good job and your readers are happy with the amount of information that you provided? Are your readers uncomfortably full; meaning that the chapter is too long and complex?
    59. Do you have a title and subtitle in mind for your ebook?
    60. Have you put together a focus group to test your ebook’s title and subtitle?
    61.  Are you going to conduct interviews (for example, interview a successful internet marketer on how to conduct keyword research)?
    62. Are you going to conduct experiments (for example, teach your brother how to set up a blog and start making money in 60 days)?
    63. How do you plan to format your eBook?
    64. Are you going to include bonuses with your ebook?
    65. Will you include audio or video?
    66. Can you include spreadsheets or templates?
    67. Can you include checklists?
    68. Are you going to have exercises at the end of each chapter so that people apply what they learned in each chapter?
    69. Can you include worksheets?
    70. Have you put your first draft aside for a few days so that you can look at it again with fresh eyes?
    71. Do you have someone who can help you proofread your ebook to make sure that it doesn’t have any spelling or grammatical mistakes?
    72. How do you plan to compile your eBook (for example, .EXE or .PDF)?
    73. What file-formats will your ebook be available in? Which devices will your readers be able to use to read your eBook
    74. Are you going to create a cover yourself, or are you going to hire someone to do it for you?
    75. Are you going to send an advance copy of your ebook to a few people in order to get testimonials?
    76. Where will you sell your ebook?
    77. Do you currently have a platform (such as a blog) from which you can sell your ebook?
    78. Do you have a social media presence (such as Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook)? If so, how do you plan to use social media in order to promote your ebook?
    79. Do you plan to build a Squidoo lens about your ebook?
    80. Do you plan to write ezine articles to promote your ebook? If so, which ezines will you be sending articles to?
    81. Will you be writing guest posts to promote your ebook (if so, what blogs will you be targeting)?
    82. Do you plan to participate in forums and leave comments on popular blogs about your topic in order to promote your ebook?
    83. Have you set any email alerts in order to track your topic?
    84. Are you going to offer free chapters of your ebook in order to entice people to buy your ebook?
    85. Are you going to offer a free mini-ecourse so that people are exposed to your message at least 7 times (marketers argue that people need to be exposed to your message 7 times before they’ll buy your product)?
    86. Can you begin to grow interest in your ebook while you’re writing it (publish excerpts or write blog posts that are related to your topic)?
    87. Will you be offering an affiliate program so that others sell your ebook for you?
    88. Are you going to set up a separate website to sell your ebook?
    89. Are you planning to buy the domain for your ebook’s title?
    90. Do you have a template for your sales page?
    91. Are you going to offer free coaching to those who buy your ebook (or free email support)?
    92. Are you going to offer a time-limited offer (such as offering your ebook at half price for a few days as soon as you launch it)?
    93. What’s your pricing strategy? Are you going to sell your ebook at the same price as your competition?
    94. Have you conducted a survey in order to determine what people would be willing to pay for your ebook?
    95. Are you going to have any back-end products?
    96. How will you deliver the ebook to those who purchase it?
    97. How will you be paid? What forms of payment will you accept?
    98. Will you get an ISBN?
    99. Are you going to offer a money-back guarantee?
    100. Are you planning to publish a hard copy version of your ebook?

    Now that you’ve answered these questions, you just might end up with the first draft of your ebook, along with a strategy detailing how you’re going to publish it — and then sell it.

    More by this author

    Marelisa Fabrega

    Marelisa is a lawyer and entrepreneur who blogs about creativity, productivity, and getting the most out of life.

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    Last Updated on January 5, 2022

    33 Painless Ways to Save Money Now

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    33 Painless Ways to Save Money Now

    In a difficult economy, most of us are looking for ways to put more money in our pockets, but we don’t want to feel like misers. We don’t want to drastically alter our lifestyles either. We want it fast and we want it easy. Small savings can add up and big savings can feel like winning the lottery, just without all of the taxes.

    Some easy ways to save money:

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    1. Online rebate sites. Many online sites offer cash back rebates and online coupons as well. MrRebates and Ebates are two I like, but there are many others.
    2. Sign up for customer rewards. Many of your favorite stores offer customer rewards on products you already buy. Take advantage.
    3. Switch to compact fluorescent bulbs. The extra cost up front is worth the energy savings later on.
    4. Turn off power strips and electronic devices when not in use.
    5. Buy a programmable thermostat. Set it to lower the heat or raise the AC when you’re not home.
    6. Make coffee at home. Those lattes and caramel macchiatos add up to quite a bit of dough over the year.
    7. Switch banks. Shop around for better interest rates, lower fees and better customer perks. Don’t forget to look for free online banking and ease of depositing and withdrawing money.
    8. Clip coupons: Saving a couple dollars here and there can start to add up. As long as you’re going to buy the products anyway, why not save money?
    9. Pack your lunch. Bring your lunch to work with you a few days a week, rather than buy it.
    10. Eat at home. We’re busier than ever, but cooking meals at home is healthier and much cheaper than take-out or going out. Plus, with all of the freezer and pre-made options, it’s almost as fast as drive-thru.
    11. Have leftovers night. Save your leftovers from a few meals and have a “leftover dinner.” It’s a free meal!
    12. Buy store brands: Many generic or store brands are actually just as good as name brands and considerably cheaper.
    13. Ditch bottled water. Drink tap water if it’s good quality, buy a filter if it’s not. Get 
        a reusable water bottle and refill it.
      • Avoid vending machines: The items are usually over-priced.
      • Take in a matinee. Afternoon movie showings are cheaper than evening times.
      • Re-examine your cable bill. Cancel extra cable or satellite channels you don’t watch. Watch the “on demand” movie purchases too.
      • Use online bill pay. Most banks offer free online bill paying. Save on stamps and checks, and avoid late fees by automating bill payment.
      • Buy frequently used items in bulk. You get a lower per item price and eliminate extra trips to the store later on.
      • Fully utilize the library. Borrowing books is much cheaper than buying them, but in addition to books, most local libraries now lend movies and games.
      • Cancel magazine/newspaper subscriptions: Re-evaluate your subscriptions. Cancel those you don’t read and consider reading some of the other publications online.
      • Get rid of your land-line. Do you really need a land-line anymore if everyone in the family has a cell phone? Alternatively, look into using VOIP or getting a cheaper plan.
      • Better fuel efficiency. Check the air pressure in your tires, keep up with proper auto maintenance, and slow down. Driving even 5MPH slower will result in better fuel mileage.
      • Increase your deductibles. Increasing the insurance deductibles on your homeowners and auto insurance policies lowers premiums significantly. Just make sure you choose a deductible that you can afford should an emergency happen.
      • Choose lunch over dinner. If you do want to dine out occasionally, go at lunchtime rather than dinnertime. Lunch prices are usually cheaper.
      • Buy used:  Whether it’s something small like a vintage dress or a video game or something big like a car or furniture, consider buying it used. You can often get “nearly new” for a fraction of the cost.
      • Stick to the list. Make a list before you go shopping and don’t buy anything that’s not on the list unless it’s a once in a lifetime, killer deal.
      • Tame the impulse. Use a self-enforced waiting period whenever you’re tempted to make an unplanned purchase. Wait for a week and see if you still want the item.
      • Don’t be afraid to ask. Ask to have fees waived, ask for a discount, ask for a lower interest rate on your credit card.
      • Repair rather than replace. You can find directions on how to fix almost anything on the internet. Do your homework, and then bring out your inner handyman.
      • Trade with your neighbors. Borrow tools or equipment that you use infrequently and swap things like babysitting with your neighbors.
      • Swap online. Use sites like PaperBack Swap to trade books, music, and movies with others online. Also, look for local community sites like Freecycle where people give away items they no longer need.
      • Cut back on the meat. Try eating a one or two meatless meals every week or cut back on the meat portions. Meat is usually the most expensive part of the meal.
      • Comparison shop: Get in the habit of checking prices before you buy. See if you can get a better price at another store or look online.

      Remember that saving money is not about being cheap or stingy; it’s about putting money into your bank account rather than giving it to someone else. There are many ways to save money, some you’ve never thought of, and some that won’t appeal or apply to you. Just pick a few of the ideas that sound doable and watch the savings add up. Save big, save small, but save wherever you can.

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      Featured photo credit: Damir Spanic via unsplash.com

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