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10 Things You Should Be Saving For Just In Case

10 Things You Should Be Saving For Just In Case

You know you should be saving your money, but do you know why? Here are ten things you should be saving for, just in case. Don’t be caught off guard! Knowing what you need money for will make it easier for you to save.

1. Paying off debt.

No one wants to be in debt their entire life! Sure, that credit card was supposed to just be for emergencies, but you started using it here and there, and then you realized you couldn’t pay the monthly bill. That’s ok — after all, that’s what credit cards are for. But don’t let your debt accumulate. Interest rates will make your fees skyrocket, and before you know it, the amount you owe will seem impossible to pay off. Instead, pay off a little per month. Try to meet more than the minimum due, if you can fit it into your budget.

2. Medical emergencies.

You’re healthy as a horse, right? Still, you never know when the flu is going to knock you out, or when you’ll get in a car wreck and have hospital bills to pay. You don’t want an unexpected illness or hospital stay to wipe out your savings, and you don’t want to be in debt or struggle to make ends meet just because of a medical problem.

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3. Periods of unemployment.

Financial advisors recommend having enough money saved to live for three to six months without any additional income. Go ahead and figure up your monthly expenses, multiply them times six, and see how much of a cushion you need to have. Are you close? If not, go ahead and add a bit into your current monthly savings that will allow you to save up this money. If you can, save even more — the more money you have in savings, the longer you’ll be able to live without a job. This means you won’t have extra financial stress when you’re unemployed, and can take your time to find the job that fits you best. It’ll be worth it so you won’t find yourself struggling if you unexpectedly lose your job!

4. Retirement.

When you’re in your twenties and even early thirties, retirement seems far away. In reality, it’s never too early to start saving for retirement. Think about it – this is money you’re putting aside so you can live more comfortably later! You won’t have to depend on Social Security income because you’ll have your own money put aside.

5. Buying a car.

It’s not too expensive to buy a car because you don’t have to pay for it all at once (but wouldn’t it be cool to buy a car in cash?), but the down payment and monthly bills can add up. If you don’t have it figured into your budget, then buying a car might set you off course. You should have money in savings that could be used for a downpayment and monthly payments on a car, just in case something happens to your current ride.

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6. Purchasing a home.

Or an apartment, or a condo, or a farm! Sooner or later, you’ll probably find yourself ready to settle down and have a stable living situation, instead of renting and moving every few years. You don’t have to pay for a home flat out, of course, but you’ll need a considerable amount for a downpayment. Also think about how you’ll need to have good credit and savings in order to get a loan.

7. Home and car insurance and repairs.

Once you’ve saved up for that car and that home, you’ll have a lot of additional expenses! You’ll need car insurance, home insurance, you’ll have to pay property taxes depending on where you live. Your car will need tune-ups and your house will need repairs and maintenance. You’ll need money in your savings account so your water heater busting or your muffler falling off won’t leave you frantically searching for a cheap, easy solution.

8. Education.

There may come a time in your life when you’ll want to go back to school and get a master’s degree or a special certificate. As a working adult, it’s possible to get tuition assistance, but not guaranteed. Instead of having to decide between going back to school or staying in the same dead-end job, wouldn’t it be great to know you have the ability to pay for your education? And if you never go back to school, this money can go to your children’s college funds!

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9. Investment properties.

Whether you already have your own house or not, having an investment property is never a bad idea. It could be a rental house for students near the university, or a beach house you rent out in Florida – these properties will provide income with minimal effort. Sure, you’ll be responsible for repairs and will have to screen your tenants to ensure they won’t damage the property and leave, but if you charge a bit more than what you have to pay each month for the mortgage and upkeep, you’ll make a nice profit!

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    10. Caring for elderly family members.

    You don’t want to think about it, but there may come a time in your life where you’ll have to take care of elderly family members. Grandparents, aging parents, aunts, uncles — who knows who will need help as they get older? You don’t want to be in the helpless position of turning down those who need you, so make sure you have savings to help them out. This could include groceries, living expenses, medical bills, in-home nurses or even helping move them to an assisted living home. These transitions are going to be difficult enough emotionally; you might as well try to lighten the load financially.

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    Featured photo credit: 401 (K) 2013 via flickr.com

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    Published on November 8, 2018

    How to Answer the Tough Question: What are Your Salary Requirements?

    How to Answer the Tough Question: What are Your Salary Requirements?

    After a few months of hard work and dozens of phone calls later, you finally land a job opportunity.

    But then, you’re asked about your salary requirements and your mind goes blank. So, you offer a lower salary believing this will increase your odds at getting hired.

    Unfortunately, this is the wrong approach.

    Your salary requirements can make or break your odds at getting hired. But only if you’re not prepared.

    Ask for a salary too high with no room for negotiation and your potential employer will not be able to afford you. Aim too low and employers will perceive as you offering low value. The trick is to aim as high as possible while keeping both parties feel happy.

    Of course, you can’t command a high price without bringing value.

    The good news is that learning how to be a high-value employee is possible. You have to work on the right tasks to grow in the right areas. Here are a few tactics to negotiate your salary requirements with confidence.

    1. Hack time to accomplish more than most

    Do you want to get paid well for your hard work? Of course you do. I hate to break it to you, but so do most people.

    With so much competition, this won’t be an easy task to achieve. That’s why you need to become a pro at time management.

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    Do you know how much free time you have? Not the free time during your lunch break or after you’ve finished working at your day job. Rather, the free time when you’re looking at your phone or watching your favorite TV show.

    Data from 2017 shows that Americans spend roughly 3 hours watching TV. This is time poorly spent if you’re not happy with your current lifestyle. Instead, focus on working on your goals whenever you have free time.

    For example, if your commute to/from work is 1 hour, listen to an educational Podcast. If your lunch break is 30 minutes, read for 10 to 15 minutes. And if you have a busy life with only 30–60 minutes to spare after work, use this time to work on your personal goals.

    Create a morning routine that will set you up for success every day. Start waking up 1 to 2 hours earlier to have more time to work on your most important tasks. Use tools like ATracker to break down which activities you’re spending the most time in.

    It won’t be easy to analyze your entire day, so set boundaries. For example, if you have 4 hours of free time each day, spend at least 2 of these hours working on important tasks.

    2. Set your own boundaries

    Having a successful career isn’t always about the money. According to Gallup, about 70% of employees aren’t satisfied with their current jobs.[1]

    Earning more money isn’t a bad thing, but choosing a higher salary over the traits that are the most important to you is. For example, if you enjoy spending time with your family, reject job offers requiring a lot of travel.

    Here are some important traits to consider:

    • Work and life balance – The last thing you’d want is a job that forces you to work 60+ hours each week. Unless this is the type of environment you’d want. Understand how your potential employer emphasizes work/life balance.
    • Self-development opportunities – Having the option to grow within your company is important. Once you learn how to do your tasks well, you’ll start becoming less engaged. Choose a company that encourages employee growth.
    • Company culture – The stereotypical cubicle job where one feels miserable doesn’t have to be your fate. Not all companies are equal in culture. Take, for example, Google, who invests heavily in keeping their employees happy.[2]

    These are some of the most important traits to look for in a company, but there are others. Make it your mission to rank which traits are important to you. This way you’ll stop applying to the wrong companies and stay focused on what matters to you more.

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    3. Continuously invest in yourself

    Investing in yourself is the best investment you can make. Cliche I know, but true nonetheless.

    You’ll grow as a person and gain confidence with the value you’ll be able to bring to others. Investing in yourself doesn’t have to be expensive. For example, you can read books to expand your knowledge in different fields.

    Don’t get stuck into the habit of reading without a purpose. Instead, choose books that will help you expand in a field you’re looking to grow. At the same time, don’t limit yourself to reading books in one subject–create a healthy balance.

    Podcasts are also a great medium to learn new subjects from experts in different fields. The best part is they’re free and you can consume them on your commute to/from work.

    Paid education makes sense if you have little to no debt. If you decide to go back to school, be sure to apply for scholarships and grants to have the least amount of debt. Regardless of which route you take to make it a habit to grow every day.

    It won’t be easy, but this will work to your advantage. Most people won’t spend most of their free time investing in themselves. This will allow you to grow faster than most, and stand out from your competition.

    4. Document the value you bring

    Resumes are a common way companies filter employees through the hiring process. Here’s the big secret: It’s not the only way you can showcase your skills.

    To request for a higher salary than most, you have to do what most are unwilling to do. Since you’re already investing in yourself, make it a habit to showcase your skills online.

    A great way to do this is to create your own website. Pick your first and last name as your domain name. If this domain is already taken, get creative and choose one that makes sense.

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    Here are some ideas:

    • joesmith.com
    • joeasmith.com
    • joesmithprojects.com

    Nowadays, building a website is easy. Once you have your website setup, begin producing content. For example, if you a developer you can post the applications you’re building.

    During your interviews, you’ll have an online reference to showcase your accomplishments. You can use your accomplishments to justify your salary requirements. Since most people don’t do this, you’ll have a higher chance of employers accepting your offer

    5. Hide your salary requirements

    Avoid giving you salary requirements early in the interview process.

    But if you get asked early, deflect this question in a non-defensive manner. Explain to the employer that you’d like to understand your role better first. They’ll most likely agree with you; but if they don’t, give them a range.

    The truth is great employers are more concerned about your skills and the value you bring to the company. They understand that a great employee is an investment, able to earn them more than their salary.

    Remember that a job interview isn’t only for the employer, it’s also for you. If the employer is more interested in your salary requirements, this may not be a good sign. Use this question to gauge if the company you’re interviewing is worth working for.

    6. Do just enough research

    Research average salary compensation in your industry, then wing it.

    Use tools like Glassdoor to research the average salary compensation for your industry. Then leverage LinkedIn’s company data that’s provided with its Pro membership. You can view a company’s employee growth and the total number of job openings.

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    Use this information to make informed decisions when deciding on your salary requirements. But don’t limit yourself to the average salary range. Companies will usually pay you more for the value you have.

    Big companies will often pay more than smaller ones.[3] Whatever your desired salary amount is, always ask for a higher amount. Employers will often reject your initial offer. In fact, offer a salary range that’ll give you and your employer enough room to negotiate.

    7. Get compensated by your value

    Asking for the salary you deserve is an art. On one end, you have to constantly invest in yourself to offer massive value. But this isn’t enough. You also have to become a great negotiator.

    Imagine requesting a high salary and because you bring a lot of value, employers are willing to pay you this. Wouldn’t this be amazing?

    Most settle for average because they’re not confident with what they have to offer. Most don’t invest in themselves because they’re not dedicated enough. But not you.

    You know you deserve to get paid well, and you’re willing to put in the work. Yet, you won’t sacrifice your most important values over a higher salary.

    The bottom line

    You’ve got what it takes to succeed in your career. Invest in yourself, learn how to negotiate, and do research. The next time you’re asked about your salary requirements, you won’t fumble.

    You’ll showcase your skills with confidence and get the salary you deserve. What’s holding you back now?

    Featured photo credit: LinkedIn Sales Navigator via unsplash.com

    Reference

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